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11 Celebrities Posing with mental_floss

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Dateline: Novi, Michigan – Motor City Comic Con 2012. Your intrepid reporter and her ever-patient husband/photographer brave the hordes of Darth Vaders, Dudley Do-Rights, and Daryl Dixons to bring you 11 celebrities posing with mental_floss:

1. Sean Patrick Flanery

With a name like Sean Patrick Flanery, one would presume that that Irish brogue used by The Boondock Saints' Connor McManus came naturally. But one would be wrong. The actor grew up in Houston, Texas, and it proved as tough for Flanery to adopt a Celtic lilt as it did for him to overcome his Texas twang. Flanery’s tough guy persona is bona fide; he has a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, as well as one in karate. As you can see here, he even took an attack pose when we handed him an issue of mental_floss.Kind of hard to picture him as the sensitive (and hairless) Jeremy Reed in the film Powder, no? Sean loves to hear from fans, so check out his website at www.seanflanery.com or tweet him (@seanflanery).

2. Loni Anderson

When Loni was born in 1946, her father wanted to christen her with the Hawaiian-sounding name Leiloni. Further consideration made him realize that a name pronounced "Lay Loni" might be unsuitable later in life, so he and her mother shortened it to Loni. Anderson first gained fame as the sexy but smart receptionist Jennifer Marlowe on WKRP in Cincinnati. She also starred in the made-for-TV movie ratings-grabber The Jayne Mansfield Story. In 1984, she co-starred with Lynda Carter as a pair (no pun intended) of private investigators in the TV series Partners in Crime. Anderson’s résumé  is filled with later TV and movie appearances, but for some reason, the mention of Loni Anderson and Lynda Carter together caused my photographer (my husband, Sandy) to twitch uncontrollably and loll his tongue out of his mouth à la Homer Simpson. I had to cut short our interview for a quick trip to the hydration booth.

3. Bill Mumy (and friend)

By the time seven-year-old “Billy” Mumy played young Anthony Fremont - who sent mean people to the corn field - on the “It’s a Good Life” episode of the original Twilight Zone, he already had some two dozen TV appearances under his tiny belt. Of course, Mumy went on to appear as a regular on Lost in Space and Babylon 5, and had roles in many films, but he’s also kept busy all these years as a musician, writer, producer, and voiceover artist. He’s one-half of novelty duo Barnes & Barnes (remember “Fish Heads”?) but has also written several mainstream musical scores for dozens of TV shows, from the soap Santa Barbara to several Animal Planet series. Find out more about the Marvel Comics he’s written, his current band The Jenerators, his twice-weekly Real Good Radio Hour, and much more at www.billmumy.com

4. Valerie Perrine

Perrine earned a special place in television history by being the first female to appear nude on prime-time network TV. True, the network was PBS, and many affiliates refused to air the 1973 playlet Steambath, which also starred Bill Bixby and Herb Edelman. One year later, Valerie co-starred with Dustin Hoffman in the Oscar-winning Lenny, a biopic about controversial comedian Lenny Bruce. At the other end of the spectrum, Perrine was nominated for a Razzie Award in the ill-fated disco musical Can’t Stop the Music, which has since become a Xanadu-esque cult favorite. In person, it’s clear that Valerie Perrine and Dawn Wells have been sharing anti-aging tips. She's as lovely as ever, and it was truly a pleasure to meet her.  You can see her entire TV/filmography, her Playboy cover, and more at www.valerieperrine.com

5. Butch Patrick

Butch Patrick is bemused by reviews of the recent Dark Shadows feature-film remake that liken Johnny Depp’s portrayal of Barnabus Collins to that of the original Eddie Munster. Because, as any The Munsters fan knows, Eddie was a werewolf; Collins is a vampire. Nevertheless, it’s a tribute to Patrick's characterization that little Edward Wolfgang Munster is still vividly remembered, even 46 years after the show ceased production. Patrick’s website www.munsters.com is the official source of Munsters behind-the-scene stories, memorabilia, and other titillating tidbits about TV’s First Family of Fright.

6. Christopher Knight

As middle brother Peter on The Brady Bunch, Christopher Knight generated more fan mail than even hunky older brother Barry Williams. To his credit, Knight found a way to combine his innate charisma with his keen interest in science and mechanics. Since 1988, he's worked with several hi-tech companies as a software engineer and account manager, racking up his share of multi-million dollar accounts along the way. He has dabbled in the occasional reality television series, but not enough to interest him in maintaining a personal website. He humbly states that he’s “not really into” promoting himself, but after talking to him for just 10 minutes, it's easy to see why he’s tops as a sales professional – we’d certainly buy a used car from him!

7. Dawn Wells

The lovely former Miss Nevada could win a Nobel prize tomorrow, and without a doubt, the newspaper headlines would say: "Mary Ann wins Nobel." But Dawn Wells is fine being identified with her Gilligan’s Island character. In fact, she embraces it, which is probably why she looks more beautiful at 74 than most women 20 years her junior. While dabbling in regional theater over the years, Wells has also undertaken a number of charitable pursuits, including the Terry Lee Wells Foundation and Discovery Museum that honors her late cousin (www.nvdm.org). Long after Gilligan's Island was off the air, Dawn didn't hesitate to lend a hand when aging castmate Natalie Schafer (Mrs. Howell) needed care. Her efforts even inspired her to design a clothing line for seniors that was just as functional - but far more attractive - than the traditional hospital gown.

A personal note: at the time we chatted with Dawn, her booth had the longest line of any celebrity at the convention, and a number of those waiting were in wheelchairs and could not speak other than guttural utterances in either the affirmative or negative. Each one of those fans, though, had seen enough Gilligan’s Island episodes to know what they liked and picked out a specific 8 x 10 photo from the available choices. Dawn Wells not only took the time to personally autograph the pictures, but also came out from behind her table to speak with all of them and give them a smile and a hug. Visit her official site at www.dawn-wells.com

8. Deep Roy

“Deep Roy” may sound like a deliberate attempt at a catchy stage moniker, but it’s actually just a variation on the Kenyan-born Indian actor's real name: Gurdeep Roy. Acting opportunities are often limited for Little People, but Deep Roy has been working consistently since 1976, when he made his big screen debut in The Pink Panther Strikes Again. You may remember him from Big Fish, and more recently he played all the Oompa-Loompas in Tim Burton’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Deep's complete filmography is far too exhaustive to mention here, so please take a moment to check out his official website at www.deeproyinc.com

9. Erin Gray

In 1971, an advertising executive at New York’s McCann-Erickson Agency came up with a tag line to promote a pricey line of L’Oreal hair dye: “Because I’m worth it.” The woman chosen to first utter that famous line on a TV commercial was a pretty, up-and-coming model named Erin Gray. Hollywood beckoned, and Gray enthralled millions of viewers with her portrayal of Colonel Wilma, the beauty with brains on TV’s Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. She went on to portray the beautiful-yet-wholesome girlfriend-turned-wife of the father on Silver Spoons, but on the set, her young stepson on the show had decidedly unwholesome feelings for her. Rick Schroder confessed in a 2011 interview that, as a typical teenage boy, he found it "cruel" that Erin liked to perform yoga stretches during filming breaks! Erin has been working steadily in TV, theater, and films over the years – you can find detailed information at www.eringray.com

10. Peter Tork

Just like the false story that Charles Manson auditioned to become a member of The Monkees, it was untrue that none of the four chosen men had musical experience. Both Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork had worked as professional musicians prior to landing roles on the TV series. No less a master than Jimi Hendrix - who opened for The Monkees on a U.S. tour - proclaimed that Peter Tork was “the most talented Monkee” after jamming with him on several occasions. Adept at many musical instruments, including guitar, bass, keyboard, banjo, and french horn, Tork earned a living playing backup for John Phillips, Steven Stills, Van Dyke Parks, and Arthur Lee at shows in New York’s Greenwich Village. Peter has continued to dabble in acting over the years, but his true love is music, specifically the blues. Since the 1990s, his band Shoe Suede Blues has provided him with a creative outlet. Find out more about Peter’s past and present at www.petertork.com

11. Yvonne Craig

Instead of allowing us kids to watch Batman on the color, living-room TV, dad banished us to the tiny, old black-and-white set in the basement. That changed with the show's third season, when Yvonne Craig joined the cast as Batgirl. Go figure, there was something about her figure-hugging costume and high kicks (delivered with stiletto boots) that seemed to appeal to him. As we learned during our time with her, Yvonne started out as a ballerina, which confirms my dad’s oft-mentioned remark, with tongue lolling out à la Sandy above, that “with legs like that, she must be a dancer!” Craig still draws attention with her beauty and her acting ability, and if you want to catch up with her, or just gawk at photos of her in that sparkly catsuit, head over to www.yvonnecraig.com

Follow-Up:

All of the above celebrities were kind enough to chat with us and pose with a magazine, and almost every one of them flipped through the issue and asked questions. (We left the copies with them, of course.) A few of them - we won't mention names - took the time to reach underneath the table and pull out reading glasses to peruse it closely. A couple started peppering us with trivia questions to challenge us. Both Peter Tork and Bill Mumy’s assistants asked us for an extra copy because “they’d never get to see it” nodding toward said celebs who actually sat down and started seriously reading, temporarily ignoring the fans in line. We ask you to not only share your memories of these celebs (Childhood crush? He/she scared you on a TV show? etc.) but also to take a moment to click on their websites and tell ‘em that you appreciate their work (and that mental_floss sent you!).

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10 Witty Facts About The Marx Brothers
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Talented as individuals and magnificent as a team, the Marx Brothers conquered every medium from the vaudeville stage to the silver screen. Today, we’re tipping our hats (and tooting our horns) to Groucho, Harpo, Chico, Zeppo, and Gummo—on the 50th anniversary of Groucho's passing.

1. A RUNAWAY MULE INSPIRED THEM TO TAKE A STAB AT COMEDY.

Julius, Milton, and Arthur Marx originally aspired to be professional singers. In 1907, the boys joined a group called “The Three Nightingales.” Managed by their mother, Minnie, the ensemble performed covers of popular songs in theaters all over the country. As Nightingales, the brothers enjoyed some moderate success, but they might never have found their true calling if it weren’t for an unruly equid. During a 1907 gig at the Nacogdoches Opera House in East Texas, someone interrupted the performance by barging in and shouting “Mule’s loose!” Immediately, the crowd raced out to watch the newly-liberated animal. Back inside, Julius seethed. Furious at having lost the spotlight, he skewered his audience upon their return. “The jackass is the finest flower of Tex-ass!” he shouted, among many other ad-libbed jabs. Rather than boo, the patrons roared with laughter. Word of his wit soon spread and demand for these Marx brothers grew.

2. THEY RECEIVED THEIR STAGE NAMES DURING A POKER GAME.

In May of 1914, the five Marxes were playing cards with standup comedian Art Fisher. Inspired by a popular comic strip character known as “Sherlocko the Monk,” he decided that the boys could use some new nicknames. Leonard’s was a no-brainer. Given his girl-crazy, “chick-chasing” lifestyle, Fisher dubbed him “Chicko” (later, this was shortened to “Chico”). Arthur loved playing the harp and thus became “Harpo.” An affinity for soft gumshoes earned Milton the alias “Gummo.” Finally, Julius was both cynical and often seen wearing a “grouch bag”—wherein he’d store small objects like marbles and candy—around his neck. Thus, “Groucho” was born. For the record, nobody knows how Herbert Marx came to be known as “Zeppo.”

3. GROUCHO WORE HIS TRADEMARK GREASEPAINT MUSTACHE BECAUSE HE HATED MORE REALISTIC MODELS.

Michael Ochs Archives/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Phony, glue-on facial hair can be a pain to remove and reapply, so Groucho would simply paint a ‘stache and some exaggerated eyebrows onto his face. However, the mustache he later rocked as the host of his famous quiz show You Bet Your Life was 100 percent real.

4. HARPO WAS A SELF-TAUGHT HARPIST.

Without any formal training (or the ability to read sheet music), the second-oldest Marx brother developed a unique style that he never stopped improving upon. “Dad really loved playing the harp, and he did it constantly,” his son, Bill Marx, wrote. “Maybe the first multi-tasker ever, he even had a harp in the bathroom so he could play when he sat on the toilet!”

5. THE VERY FIRST MARX BROTHERS MOVIE WAS NEVER RELEASED.

Financed by Groucho, Chico, Harpo, Zeppo, and a handful of other investors, Humor Risk was filmed in 1921. Accounts differ, but most scholars agree that the silent picture—which would have served as the family’s cinematic debut—never saw completion. Despite this, an early screening of the work-in-progress was reportedly held in the Bronx. When Humor Risk failed to impress there, production halted. By Marx Brothers standards, it would’ve been an unusual flick, with Harpo playing a heroic detective opposite a villainous Groucho character.

6. GUMMO AND ZEPPO BECAME TALENT AGENTS.

World War I forced Gummo to quit the stage. Following his return, the veteran decided that performing was no longer for him and instead started a raincoat business. Zeppo—the youngest brother—then assumed Gummo’s role as the troupe’s straight-talking foil. A brilliant businessman, Zeppo eventually break away to found the talent agency Zeppo Marx Inc., which grew into Hollywood’s third-largest, representing superstars like Clark Gable, Lucille Ball, and—of course—the other three Marx Brothers. Gummo, who joined the company in 1935, was charged with handling Groucho, Harpo, and Chico’s needs.

7. CHICO ONCE LAUNCHED A BIG BAND GROUP.

Chico took advantage of an extended break between Marx brothers movies to realize a lifelong dream. A few months before The Big Store hit cinemas in 1941, he co-founded the Chico Marx Orchestra: a swinging jazz band that lasted until July of 1943. Short-lived as the group was, however, it still managed to recruit some amazing talent—including singer/composer Mel Tormé, who would go on to help write the “The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)” in 1945.

8. THEY TESTED OUT NEW MATERIAL FOR A NIGHT AT THE OPERA IN FRONT OF LIVE AUDIENCES.

With the script still being drafted, MGM made the inspired choice to let the brothers perform key scenes in such places as Seattle, Salt Lake City, and San Francisco. Once a given joke was made, the Marxes meticulously timed the ensuing laughter, which let them know exactly how much silence to leave after repeating the gag on film. According to Harpo, this had the added benefit of shortening A Night at the Opera’s production period. “We didn’t have to rehearse,” he explained. “[We just] got onto the set and let the cameras roll.”

9. GROUCHO TEMPORARILY HOSTED THE TONIGHT SHOW.

Jack Paar bid the job farewell on March 29, 1962. Months before their star’s departure, NBC offered Paar’s Tonight Show seat to Groucho, who had established himself as a razor-sharp, well-liked host during You Bet Your Life’s 14-year run. Though Marx turned the network down, he later served as a guest host for two weeks while Johnny Carson prepared to take over the gig. When Carson finally made his Tonight Show debut on October 1, it was Groucho who introduced him.

10. SPY MAGAZINE USED A MARX BROTHERS MOVIE TO PRANK U.S. CONGRESSMEN.

Duck Soup takes place in Freedonia, a fictional country over which the eccentric Rufus T. Firefly (Groucho) presides. In 1993, 60 years after the movie’s release, this imaginary nation made headlines by embarrassing some real-life politicians. Staffers from Spy got in touch with around 20 freshmen in the House of Representatives, asking some variation on the question “Do you approve of what we’re doing to stop ethnic cleansing in Freedonia?” A few lawmakers took the bait. Representative Corrine Brown (D-Florida) professed to approve of America’s presence in Freedonia, saying “I think all of those situations are very, very sad, and I just think we need to take action to assist the people.” Across the aisle, Steve Buyer (R-Indiana) concurred. “Yeah,” he said, “it’s a different situation than the Middle East.”

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15 Surprising Facts About Steve Carell
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From the seven seasons he spent as the star of NBC’s The Office to leading man roles in comedy classics like The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Steve Carell has become one of Hollywood’s most in-demand funnymen. But he has proven his dramatic chops, too, particularly with his role as John du Pont in Foxcatcher, which earned Carell an Oscar nomination for Best Actor in 2015. Even if you’ve seen all of his movies, there’s probably a lot you don’t know about the Massachusetts native, who turns 55 years old today.

1. HE THOUGHT HE WANTED TO BE A LAWYER.

Steve Carell attended Ohio’s Denison University, where he received a history degree in 1984, and had planned to move on to law school. But when it came time to apply, he found himself stumped by the first question on the application: Why do you want to be a lawyer?

“I had never considered acting as a career choice, although I’d always enjoyed it,” Carell told NJ.com in 2011. “I enjoyed hockey and singing in the choir, and I didn’t think of them as potential careers, either … But I began to realize I really loved acting, and telling stories. Reading a book, watching a movie, going to a play, it’s transporting, and very, very exciting. And to be a part of that, creating things with your imagination, whoa."

2. HE WORKED AS A MAILMAN.

Shortly before he moved to Chicago and performed with The Second City, Carell worked as a postal carrier in the tiny town of Littleton, Massachusetts. Because the post office didn’t have its own mail vehicles, Carell had to use his own car. He kept the gig for just four months, then took off for the Windy City. “And months later, I found mail under the seat of my car,” he admitted. Carell also said it was the hardest job he has ever had.

3. HE WAS HIS WIFE’S TEACHER.

No, it’s not as risqué as it sounds. Carell met his wife, Nancy Walls, through an improv class at Second City; he was the teacher, she was one of his students. “I beat around the bush [before asking her out] and said something stupid like, ‘Well, you know, if I were to ever ask someone out, it would be someone like you,’” Carell told Details of his earliest attempts at flirting. “It’s so stupid, but it was all self-protection. She was the same way: ‘If somebody like you were to ask me out, I would definitely go out with him. If there was a person like you.’” The couple married in 1995 and have appeared in several projects together.

4. THE COUPLE HAD TO BREAK UP (ON CAMERA) ON THEIR 17TH ANNIVERSARY.

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For Lorene Scafaria’s underrated 2012 end-of-the-world dramedy Seeking a Friend for the End of the World, Steve and Nancy played a married couple who split up when it’s announced that an asteroid heading toward Earth will obliterate the planet in three weeks. Their break-up scene happens very early on in the movie, and they ended up filming it on their 17th wedding anniversary.

“She gets to leave me right at the beginning,” Carell told Parade. “They used the take where her shoe came off in the car, and she bolted across that field with one shoe on. I don’t think I’ve ever seen her run that fast. We shot the scene on our 17th anniversary. [The director] got us a cake and the crew sang ‘Happy Anniversary’ to us. It was very sweet, a very special night."

5. HE AND HIS WIFE AUDITIONED FOR SNL TOGETHER; ONLY ONE OF THEM MADE IT.

In 1995, the same year they married, both Carell and Walls auditioned for Saturday Night Live. Walls made it but Carell didn’t, which must have made for one awkward celebratory dinner. But it all turned out well in the end; Carell went on to become a household name and has hosted the show on two occasions.

6. HE WAS ONE HALF OF “THE AMBIGUOUSLY GAY DUO.”

Though he missed out on the chance to become a regular SNL cast member, there was a silver lining: He was free to say “yes” to taking a role on The Dana Carvey Show, a sketch show that SNL alum Dana Carvey created for ABC. Though it was short-lived, the show was full of amazing comedic talent; in addition to Carvey and Carell, the show featured Stephen Colbert, Bob Odenkirk, and Robert Smigel and a writers room that included Louis C.K., Charlie Kaufman, and Robert Carlock. The show marked the debut of Smigel’s recurring animated sketch, “The Ambiguously Gay Duo,” which followed the adventures of Gary and Ace, who were voiced by Carell and Colbert, respectively. After the show was cancelled, Smigel brought the “Duo” over to Saturday Night Live.

7. HE OWNS A GENERAL STORE IN MASSACHUSETTS.

While many A-list stars run side businesses—restaurants, wine companies, clothing lines, etc.—the Carells' second gig is a little less glamorous. In 2009, they bought the Marshfield Hills General Store in Marshfield, Massachusetts—where they spend their summers—in order to preserve it as a local landmark. 

“The main impetus to keep it going is that not many of those places exist and I wanted this one to stay afloat,” Carell told The Patriot Ledger. “Just generally speaking, there are not that many local sort of communal places as there used to be ... I think it’s nice for people to actually go and talk and have a cup of coffee and communicate with one another."

8. HE PLAYS THE FIFE.

Yes, Carell has got some musical talent and can actually play the fife. It’s a skill he acquired early in life, and shares with several of his family members. And it came in handy when he joined a reenactment group that portrayed the 10th (North Lincoln) Regiment of Foot, a line infantry regiment with the British Army.

9. HE WAS NOT THE FIRST CHOICE TO PLAY MICHAEL SCOTT IN THE OFFICE.

Though Michael Scott, the clueless manager of paper company Dunder Mifflin’s Scranton, Pennsylvania branch in The Office, is still probably Carell's best-known role, he wasn’t the first choice for the part. Paul Giamatti was reportedly the first choice, but he declined. Hank Azaria and Martin Short were also in the running. Bob Odenkirk was actually cast in the role because Carell was committed to another series, Come to Papa. But when that show was cancelled after just a few episodes, the role of Michael Scott was recast with Carell. (Odenkirk appeared in one of the series’s later episodes, playing a boss who was eerily similar to Carell’s Scott.)

10. WHEN CARELL LEFT THE OFFICE, THE CAST AND CREW “RETIRED” HIS NUMBER ON THE CALL SHEET.

NBC Universal, Inc.

When Carell left The Office after seven seasons to focus on his film career, the cast and crew continued one tradition in his honor. “Steve was No. 1 on the call sheet because he was the lead of the show,” co-star Jenna Fischer told TV Guide. “And when he left, we retired his number. No one, ever since he left, was allowed to be No. 1."

11. HE WAS IN TALKS TO PLAY RON DONALD ON PARTY DOWN.

Before Party Down made its premiere on Starz with Adam Scott playing failed actor Henry Pollard, it was supposed to be an HBO series with Paul Rudd in the lead. And Rudd was pushing for Carell to play bumbling catering manager Ron Donald, as The Office didn’t get off to a great start and looked to be in danger of getting cancelled. Ultimately, HBO ended up abandoning the project, which Starz scooped up—with Scott as Pollard and Ken Marino as Ron Donald.

12. JAMES SPADER REALLY WANTED TO PLAY BRICK TAMLAND IN ANCHORMAN.

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Though it was The 40-Year-Old Virgin that turned Carell into a leading man on the big screen, his role as oddball meteorologist Brick Tamland in Anchorman brought him a lot of attention. But if James Spader had his way, Carell would never have appeared in the role at all. In a 2013 interview with Baller Status, director Adam McKay shared that before the film was even cast:

“I get a phone call and I hear that James Spader is obsessed with Brick's character. I say ‘James Spader? That is insane, will he come in and read?’ They say, ‘No, he's not going to come in and read; he's James Spader!’ James Spader and I end up talking and he called it about the Brick character. He thought it was one of the funniest character he ever read and we weren't even sure if it was going to work. He literally said, ‘I will do anything to get this role.’ Eventually, we were just like, ‘This is James Spader; he is too good for this role.’ But, he was right about how funny it was. The movie studio even questioned us and said how bizarre Brick is, and it wouldn't work. I felt bad we didn't cast James, but Carell was so good.”

Spader proved his comedic chops in 2011, when he was cast as Robert California, Michael Scott’s replacement on The Office (who quickly manages to convince the company owner to appoint him as CEO).

13. UNIVERSAL STUDIOS' EXECUTIVES WERE CONCERNED THAT CARELL WAS COMING OFF AS A SERIAL KILLER IN THE 40-YEAR-OLD VIRGIN.

Though it turned out to be one of 2005’s biggest hits, getting the tone right on Judd Apatow’s The 40-Year-Old Virgin proved to be a fairly difficult task. At one point, executives at Universal Studios expressed their concern to Apatow that Carell might come off as a serial killer to viewers.

"There is a fine line," producer Mary Parent told the Los Angeles Times. "Men and women alike could look at him and if he's too much of a sad sack, they will think, 'Dude, get a life.’” Apatow ended up adding several lines about the fact that Carell’s character could be a serial killer.

14. HE LEARNED MAGIC FROM DAVID COPPERFIELD.

In 2013, Carell played a magician in The Incredible Burt Wonderstone. In order to get the role just right, he went straight to the top: David Copperfield. The famed illusionist taught Carell and co-star Steve Buscemi a trick called “The Hangman,” and they were both sworn to secrecy. “I actually had to sign something that I would not divulge,” Carell told The Hollywood Reporter. “So that was kind of cool.”

15. HE OFFERED PRINCETON'S 2012 CLASS SOME TIPS FOR SUCCESS.

In 2012, Carell delivered a speech to Princeton University graduates—which included his niece—during Class Day. He ended his talk by offering some tips to the grads:

“I would like to leave you with a few random thoughts. Not advice per se, but some helpful hints: Show up on time. Because to be late is to show disrespect. Remember that the words 'regime' and 'regimen' are not interchangeable. Get a dog, because cats are lame. Only use a 'That's what she said' joke if you absolutely cannot resist. Never try to explain a 'That's what she said' joke to your parents. When out to eat, tip on the entire check. Do not subtract the tax first. And every once in a while, put something positive into the world. We have become so cynical these days. And by we I mean us. So do something kind, make someone laugh, and don't take yourself too seriously.”

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