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The 12 Times NHL Goalies Scored Goals Themselves

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New Jersey Devils goalie Martin Brodeur, who has helped lead his team to the Stanley Cup Finals, is part of an exclusive club. Brodeur is one of 10 goalies who has scored a goal in an NHL game and one of two goalies who has scored twice. Here’s the complete list.

1. Billy Smith, 1979

Smith, who led the New York Islanders to four straight Stanley Cups from 1980-83, became the first goalie in NHL history to score a goal in a game against Colorado. The Rockies pulled their goalie for an extra skater after the Islanders were called for a delayed penalty and Smith deflected a shot behind the net. Colorado’s Rob Ramage retrieved it and attempted to swing the puck back to a teammate on the blue line, but his pass missed the mark and rolled all the way down the ice and into his own team’s empty net. Smith, the last Islanders player to touch the puck, was credited with the goal. “One day I’ll be able to say whatever I want,” Smith told the New York Times in 1982. “I’ll tell people I shot the puck in.”

2 & 3. Ron Hextall, 1987 and 1989

Hextall, who played 11 of his 13 seasons with the Philadelphia Flyers, became the first NHL goalie to shoot and score a goal. With Philadelphia leading Boston 4-2, the Bruins pulled their goalie. Hextall corralled a loose puck to the left of the net and fired a 180-foot shot into the empty net. “I knew I had to get height on it to get it over a couple of guys,” Hextall said after the game. “I’d rather score a goal than get a shutout… I’m thinking about asking the coach to put me on the power play.”

Two years later, Hextall tallied a shorthanded goal in an 8-5 win over the Washington Capitals in the playoffs. “I don't know how many I'll score, but it's always a thrill.”

4. Chris Osgood, 1996

It would be seven years before another NHL goalie scored a goal. Osgood turned the trick against the Hartford Whalers, scoring an empty-net goal in the waning seconds of the Detroit Red Wings’ 4-2 win. “I went for it,” Osgood told reporters. “I had a chance in Toronto earlier this season and I was joking that the next time I had it I would shoot. I didn't look, I just shot it.”

5 & 6. Martin Brodeur, 1997 and 2000

Brodeur’s first career goal and the fifth by a goalie in NHL history came in a playoff win over the Montreal Canadiens. With New Jersey leading 4-2 late in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals, the Canadiens pulled their goalie. Brodeur lifted a loose puck the length of the ice and into the empty net. “I was freaking out,” Brodeur said. “It was unbelievable . . . When I shot it, it went over everyone and I kind of lost it. Then I saw John MacLean raise his arms up and I said, ‘Wow. It's got to go in if he's doing that.’ Guys in front of me went on the side and I saw it go in.”

Brodeur’s second career goal came on a delayed penalty. The Flyers pulled their goalie and Brodeur was the last Devils player to touch the puck before Philadelphia’s Daymond Langkow accidentally put the puck in his own net.

7. Damian Rhodes, 1999

Brodeur had a rink-side seat for the seventh goal scored by an NHL goalie. After Brodeur headed to the bench on a delayed penalty call, Lyle Odelein’s errant pass found the back of New Jersey’s empty net. Rhodes, the last Ottawa Senators player to touch the puck, was credited with the goal. It was a good night for Rhodes, who shut out the Devils in a 6-0 win.

8. Jose Theodore, 2001

Theodore’s seventh career shutout was a memorable one, as he fired a back-handed shot into an empty net with nine seconds left in Montreal’s 3-0 win over the New York Islanders. “It was awesome,” Theodore said. “I clear the puck better with my backhand, and I just gave it a high arch. I was just trying to clear the zone. I was jumping all over the place. We got the win and the shutout, and I got a goal. It was a pretty good night for me.”

9. Evgeni Nabokov, 2002

Nabokov’s goal wasn’t quite as fluky as most of the goals on this list. With the Sharks on the power play and protecting a two-goal lead late in a game against Vancouver, Nabokov corralled a loose puck in front of his net and lofted a shot down the ice that found its way into the Canucks’ empty net. “I'm going to lie if I say it wasn't exciting,” he said.

10. Mika Noronen, 2004

Noronen entered the game after Buffalo’s starting goalie, Martin Biron, was pulled with Toronto leading 3-0 midway through the second period. The Sabres stormed back to take a 5-4 lead and Toronto pulled its goalie for an extra attacker late in the third period. Noronen deflected a shot by the Maple Leafs’ Robert Reichel into the corner. Reichel regained possession and fired a pass to the center of the zone, which trickled all the way down the ice and into his own goal. “This is my first one and hopefully not the last one,” Noronen said.

11. Chris Mason, 2006

Mason was credited with a goal on a delayed penalty when Phoenix’s Geoff Sanderson passed the puck into an empty net. “It was a cheesy goal,” said Mason, whose Nashville Predators defeated the Coyotes 5-1. “I don't even like counting one like that as a goal.”

12. Cam Ward, 2011

Ward, who became the 10th NHL goalie to score a goal, also did it in a cheesy way. The Hurricanes goalie was credited with a goal by virtue of being the last Carolina player to touch the puck before New Jersey’s Ilya Kovalchuk passed the puck into his own net. “It would have been a lot cooler if I had shot the puck or did something like that,” Ward said.

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Big Questions
Why Do the Lions and Cowboys Always Play on Thanksgiving?
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Because it's tradition! But how did this tradition begin?

Every year since 1934, the Detroit Lions have taken the field for a Thanksgiving game, no matter how bad their record has been. It all goes back to when the Lions were still a fairly young franchise. The team started in 1929 in Portsmouth, Ohio, as the Spartans. Portsmouth, while surely a lovely town, wasn't quite big enough to support a pro team in the young NFL. Detroit radio station owner George A. Richards bought the Spartans and moved the team to Detroit in 1934.

Although Richards's new squad was a solid team, they were playing second fiddle in Detroit to the Hank Greenberg-led Tigers, who had gone 101-53 to win the 1934 American League Pennant. In the early weeks of the 1934 season, the biggest crowd the Lions could draw for a game was a relatively paltry 15,000. Desperate for a marketing trick to get Detroit excited about its fledgling football franchise, Richards hit on the idea of playing a game on Thanksgiving. Since Richards's WJR was one of the bigger radio stations in the country, he had considerable clout with his network and convinced NBC to broadcast a Thanksgiving game on 94 stations nationwide.

The move worked brilliantly. The undefeated Chicago Bears rolled into town as defending NFL champions, and since the Lions had only one loss, the winner of the first Thanksgiving game would take the NFL's Western Division. The Lions not only sold out their 26,000-seat stadium, they also had to turn fans away at the gate. Even though the juggernaut Bears won that game, the tradition took hold, and the Lions have been playing on Thanksgiving ever since.

This year, the Lions host the Minnesota Vikings.

HOW 'BOUT THEM COWBOYS?


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The Cowboys, too, jumped on the opportunity to play on Thanksgiving as an extra little bump for their popularity. When the chance to take the field on Thanksgiving arose in 1966, it might not have been a huge benefit for the Cowboys. Sure, the Lions had filled their stadium for their Thanksgiving games, but that was no assurance that Texans would warm to holiday football so quickly.

Cowboys general manager Tex Schramm, though, was something of a marketing genius; among his other achievements was the creation of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders.

Schramm saw the Thanksgiving Day game as a great way to get the team some national publicity even as it struggled under young head coach Tom Landry. Schramm signed the Cowboys up for the game even though the NFL was worried that the fans might just not show up—the league guaranteed the team a certain gate revenue in case nobody bought tickets. But the fans showed up in droves, and the team broke its attendance record as 80,259 crammed into the Cotton Bowl. The Cowboys beat the Cleveland Browns 26-14 that day, and a second Thanksgiving pigskin tradition caught hold. Since 1966, the Cowboys have missed having Thanksgiving games only twice.

Dallas will take on the Los Angeles Chargers on Thursday.

WHAT'S WITH THE NIGHT GAME?


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In 2006, because 6-plus hours of holiday football was not sufficient, the NFL added a third game to the Thanksgiving lineup. This game is not assigned to a specific franchise—this year, the Washington Redskins will welcome the New York Giants.

Re-running this 2008 article a few days before the games is our Thanksgiving tradition.

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History
Beyond Board Shorts: The Rich History of Hawaii's Surf Culture
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iStock

From Australia to the Arctic Circle, adrenaline junkies around the world love catching waves—but the very first people to develop surf culture were Hawaiians. Their version of the pastime shares both similarities and differences with the one that’s commonly practiced today, according to TED-Ed’s video below.

Surfing wasn’t just a sport in Hawaii—there were social and religious elements to it, too. Hawaiians made offerings to the gods while choosing trees for boards and prayed for waves. And like a high school cafeteria, the ocean was divided by social status, with certain surf breaks reserved solely for elite Hawaiians.

The surfboards themselves used by early Hawaiians largely resembled the ones we use today, although they were fin-less and required manual turns. Learn more about surfing’s roots and evolution (and how surf culture was nearly destroyed by foreign colonizers) by watching the video below.

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