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Weekend Links: The Tutu Project

Hamburg garbagemen-turned-amateur-photographers converted trash bins into massive pinhole cameras in an effort to capture the city they love and keep clean every day. 
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A very long but really great and engaging article from the New Yorker - A Psychotronic Childhood: Learning from B-Movies. I wasn't allowed to watch movies like that growing up - what were your viewing restrictions, Flossers?
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Slate answers the question on everyone's mind last week: What do Spelling Bee winners do when they grow up?
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You know that shirt with the guitar chords A D G that says "now go start a band"? (Well now you do!) These 12 songs that sound the same are the living incarnation of that. But hey, if something works, stick with it!
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From Holly, the Tutu Project, which was recently profiled. Honestly the artistic nature of those photos and the kind of sweet yet weird juxtaposition of their subject matter is pretty amazing!
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I am really happy that io9 used a picture of Viserys from "Game of Thrones" as the header for 10 weirdest ways that ancient rulers died, because even though his creations are fictional, George R. R. Martin is really good at coming up with unique ways to end people.
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Factory balls asks you to figure out how to modify each ball to produce the target object posted on the brown box. It has 14 levels that start off easy and get harder as you advance (I didn't get past Level 5).
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Robot Revolution Update: A new surgical snakebot can slither around your heart while carrying its own scalpel and forceps. Just to let you know.
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Some of these 25 clever ideas to make life easier may be old news, but a few are new to me and hopefully to you (they're also pretty brilliant). If only I could remember to do them!
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A big thanks to everyone who sent in links this week - keep it up! Send your submissions to FlossyLinks@gmail.com.

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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