Your Favorite Computer Games Growing Up

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On Fridays, I post a series of unrelated questions meant to spark conversation in the comments. Answer one, answer all, respond to someone else's reply (you really can do that now!), whatever you want. Today has been a little crazy with all these 11 lists, so I've warmed up some previous topics...

1. I recently found myself in a "Wow, am I really doing this?" moment at Stop & Shop, and not in a good or exciting way—I was returning grapes.

During my three-year stint as an A&P cashier (and Tuesday Night Front End Manager), I would have ridiculed anyone who returned produce moments after purchasing it. But these grapes were not sufficiently seedless. In fact, they were quite seedful, which ran counter to the packaging, on which the word "seedless" appeared in two languages. I received a full refund and was not asked to pay for the three grapes I'd already eaten. Big win for Team English.

What's the weirdest thing you've ever returned? (Or the weirdest reason you've given for returning something?)


2. When I was growing up, there was no greater villain than the local guy who burned down the Sizzler. Our teachers loved to dangle him out there. Go to the bathroom without a pass? “Keep this up and you’ll end up like the guy who burned down the Sizzler.” Forget your homework? “The guy who burned down the Sizzler forgot a lot of homework when he was your age.” I guess it worked—the Sizzler was never again the target of arsonists. Who was your town’s “worst case scenario” resident?

3. I did not learn to type in our fifth-grade typing class. That skill wasn't developed for another six or seven years. I did, however, learn to transport a family across the mid-19th century plains while minimizing the number of children lost to dysentery. We also played a lot of Zork.

Oregon Trail and Zork were my favorite computer class diversions. But when we got our first home computer (1989?), I played way too much Castle Adventure.

What were your favorite grade school computer games?

4. Did your college or high school have any non-traditional graduation requirements, either official or unofficial? I've heard stories about mandatory swimming classes, required because years ago the dean's son drowned.[citation needed]

I went to Duke, where unofficial requirements included driving backwards around the traffic circle, wandering around the semi-secret underground tunnels, and several I probably can't discuss on a relatively family-friendly website. How about you?

[Have a great weekend! See all the previous Friday Happy Hour transcripts.]

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May 11, 2012 - 11:45am
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