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The Weird Week in Review

Naked Unicyclist Charged For Distracting Drivers

Joseph Glynn Farley of Clear Lake, Texas, was arrested in nearby Kemah for indecent exposure when he rode a unicycle naked on a bridge. Police chief Greg Rikard said Farley kept falling off the unicycle, causing a traffic hazard. However, he was not intoxicated. The 45-year-old Farley said he liked the feeling of riding without clothes. Police had warned him earlier, before he shed his clothing, not to ride the unicycle on the bridge.

A Prom Night to Remember

A group of high school students in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, were decked out for the prom last Saturday night. They headed to Lac La Belle and posed for group pictures on the lake's pier. Then the pier collapsed. The quick-thinking photographer kept shooting, resulting in an unforgettable sequence of pictures. The wet teenagers, attempting to save the occasion, ran so many hairdryers -plus a clothes dryer- in one home that they blew a breaker, but managed to make it to the prom.

Man Exposes Himself at Association for the Blind

Once again, real life recreates a scene from the movies, namely Revenge of the Nerds. A man exposed himself to a woman inside the Bucks County Association for the Blind in Newtown Township, Pennsylvania. The incident occurred in the facility's bookstore. The flasher fled before police arrived. One has to wonder how many times he tried it before someone noticed.

Becoming Mayor by Accident

Gino Bertolo was the only candidate running for mayor in Cimolais, Italy, a town of 507 citizens. Fearing that no one would turn out to vote, he asked his friend Fabio Borsatti to throw his name into the hat as well to produce a turnout on election day. Borsatti agreed, but still voted for Bertolo, who had served as mayor previously. When the ballots were counted, Borsatti, who had no platform, received 160 votes to Bertolo's 117. Even Borsatti's family voted for Bertolo! However, Borsatti intends to carry out the duties of his unintended office, and will focus his efforts on tourism. Bertolo says he is not upset, and is still friends with the new mayor.

Parakeet Knows Its Home Address

A lost parakeet flew into a hotel in Sagamihara, Japan, and landed on a guest’s shoulder. Since no one knew where the bird came from, it was taken in a cage to a local police station. For two days it sat there. Then the parakeet must have decided it was time to go home.

Despite giving no indications that it could talk, the bird suddenly piped up late on Tuesday night and began repeating its home address – which its owner had apparently drummed into the bird for just such an unlikely eventuality.

Specifying the address down to the number of the house and the block on which is stands, the bird enabled police to track down its 64-year-old owner.

Fumie Takahashi is glad to have her parakeet back. And that answers the question of what is the first thing you should teach your bird to say.

My Name is Tyrannosaurus Rex

Twenty-three-year-old entrepreneur Tyler Gold was looking for name recognition to help his business, a way to stand out in the crowd. So he appeared in York County District Court in Nebraska on Monday to have his name legally changed to Tyrannosaurus Rex Joseph Gold. Gold said he selected the new name because it's "cooler." However, the nature of Gold's business did not make it into the news.

Burglars Break Into Poison-filled Home

T.V. Sagnella of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had his home treated for termites, which involved covering the entire house with a plastic tent. Burglars know that a tent over the house is a sign the owners are not inside, so Sagnella rigged his home with video cameras. His brother checked the live feed at 4:30 AM Wednesday and saw a robbery in progress. The group of burglars didn't get much because an alarm tripped and police responded. Officers could not enter the house due to toxic fumes which could be felt even outside the tent. Before the police left, they received word from a flea market about an attempt to sell the stolen items. Three suspects were arrested in a vehicle that contained stolen jewelry. The story contains the surveillance video.

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London's Sewer-Blocking 'Fatbergs' Are Going to Be Turned Into Biodiesel
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UK officials can't exactly transform the Whitechapel fatberg—a 143-ton trash mass lurking in London's sewer system—into treasure, but they can turn it into fuel. As The Guardian reports, Scottish biodiesel producer Argent Energy plans to convert parts of the noxious blockage into an environmentally friendly energy source.

For the uninitiated, fatbergs (which get their names from a portmanteau of "fat" and "icebergs") are giant, solid blobs of congealed fat, oil, grease, wet wipes, and sanitary products. They form in sewers when people dump cooking byproducts down drains, or in oceans when ships release waste products like palm oil. These sticky substances combine with floating litter to form what could be described as garbage heaps on steroids.

Fatbergs wash up on beaches, muck up city infrastructures, and are sometimes even removed with cranes from sewer pipes as a last resort. Few—if any—fatbergs, however, appear to be as potentially lethal as the one workers recently discovered under London's Whitechapel neighborhood. In a news release, private utility company Thames Water described the toxic mass as "one of the largest ever found, with the extreme rock-solid mass of wet wipes, nappies, fat and oil weighing the same as 11 double-decker buses."

Ick factor aside, the Whitechapel fatberg currently blocks a stretch of Victorian sewer more than twice the length of two fields from London's Wembley Stadium. Engineers with jet hoses are working seven days a week to break up the fatberg before sucking it out with tankers. But even with high-pressure streams, the job is still akin to "trying to break up concrete," says Matt Rimmer, Thames Water's head of waste networks.

The project is slated to end in October. But instead of simply disposing of the Whitechapel fatberg, officials want to make use of it. Argent Energy—which has in the past relied on sources like rancid mayonnaise and old soup stock—plans to process fatberg sludge into more than 2600 gallons of biodiesel, creating "enough environmentally friendly energy to power 350 double-decker Routemaster buses for a day," according to Thames Water.

"Even though they are our worst enemy, and we want them dead completely, bringing fatbergs back to life when we do find them in the form of biodiesel is a far better solution for everyone," said company official Alex Saunders.

In addition to powering buses, the Whitechapel fatberg may also become an unlikely cultural touchstone: The Museum of London is working with Thames Water to acquire a chunk of the fatberg, according to BBC News. The waste exhibit will represent just one of the many challenges facing cities, and remind visitors that they are ultimately responsible for the fatberg phenomenon.

"When it comes to preventing fatbergs, everyone has a role to play," Rimmer says. "Yes, a lot of the fat comes from food outlets, but the wipes and sanitary items are far more likely to be from domestic properties. The sewers are not an abyss for household rubbish."

[h/t The Guardian]

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Restaurant Seeks Donations to Big Mouth Billy Bass Adoption Center
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Kevin Burkett, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

If you’ve ever wondered where all those Big Mouth Billy Bass singing fish that flew off shelves in the early 2000s have gone, take a look inside a Flying Fish restaurant. Each location of the southern seafood chain is home to its own Big Mouth Billy Bass Adoption Center, and they’re always accepting new additions to the collection.

According to Atlas Obscura, the gimmick was the idea of Dallas-based restaurateur Shannon Wynne. He opened his flagship Flying Fish in Little Rock, Arkansas in 2002 when the Big Mouth Billy Bass craze was just starting to wind down. As people grew tired of hearing the first 30 seconds of “Don’t Worry Be Happy” for the thousandth time, he offered them a place to bring their wall ornaments once the novelty wore off. The Flying Fish promises to “house, shelter, love, and protect” each Billy Bass they adopt. On top of that, donors get a free basket of catfish in exchange for the contribution and get their name on the wall. The Little Rock location now displays hundreds of the retired fish.

Today there are nine Flying Fish restaurants in Arkansas, Texas, and Tennessee, each with its own Adoption Center. There’s still space for new members of the family, so now may be the time to break out any Billy Basses that have been collecting dust in your attic since 2004.

And if you’re interested in stopping into Flying Fish for a bite to eat, don’t let the wall of rubber nostalgia scare you off: The batteries from all the fish have been removed, so you can enjoy your meal in peace.

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