Could Humans Hibernate?

istock.com/ByronOrtizA
istock.com/ByronOrtizA

Some animals have it made. Their whole day revolves around eating and having sex (and, to be fair, trying not to get eaten themselves). And when winter arrives, they get to curl up somewhere and wait things out until the weather is nice again. Can humans get in on this hibernation thing?

First, a note on the lingo. While people often use the term loosely to refer to any state of dormancy in animals, true hibernation is a pretty specific thing characterized by “profound reductions in metabolism, oxygen consumption and heart rate.”

A hibernating animal’s core body temperature drops to extreme lows, sometimes matching the local outside temperature. As its body cools, its metabolism slows. This reduces the need for oxygen, and its breathing will also slow, sometimes to just one to five breaths per minute. The heart rate will likewise slow to just a few beats per minute. All of this ensures that the animal’s body will conserve as much energy as possible, which is necessary because it’s largely fueling itself with a limited supply of fat. "True hibernators" don’t shut down for the whole winter, though, and occasionally rouse to use the bathroom, eat from stored food, and stretch a little so their muscles don’t atrophy. Some animals may even switch hibernation spots.

Animals go into this energy-saving mode to ride out long stretches of environmental extremes, like lack of food and water, or very cold or very hot seasonal temperatures (dormancy during cold seasons is hibernation, and dormancy in the summer is called aestivation). Humans can deal with these situations while remaining active because we have things like canned food, greenhouse tomatoes, air conditioners, heaters, and turtleneck sweaters. Our bodies aren’t required to hibernate and we’re not perfectly adapted to it, but scientists have turned up a number of ways in which we’re pretty close.

Deep Sleepers

There are plenty of documented cases of humans going into hibernation-like states. In October, 2006, rescuers found Mitsutaka Uchikoshi 24 days after he’d gone missing on western Japan’s Mount Rokko. When they discovered him, he had no detectable pulse or respiration and his body temperature had dropped to 71 degrees Fahrenheit. Doctors would later confirm that his metabolism was almost at a standstill. When he woke up, remarkably showing no signs of brain damage or other ill effects, he explained that the last thing he remembered was falling on the trail and hitting his head. The entire time he’d been missing, he was unconscious, exposed to the elements and without food or water. The doctors who treated him said that the quick onset of hypothermia slowed his body down like hibernation would, and probably saved his life.

Similar survival stories include a Norwegian skier who’d fallen into icy water and woke up unfazed after showing no heartbeat, no respiration, and a core temperature of 57ºF, and the Canadian toddler who got lost outside on a cold night and was later revived after cooling to 61ºF and exhibiting no heartbeat for a full two hours.

In a controlled experiment in the early 1970s, the Yogi Satyamurti confined himself to a small, sealed underground pit in a state of deep meditation for eight straight days while being monitored by an electrocardiogram. At first, the yogi’s heart rate was normal, and then increased to 250 bpm for a while. On the evening to the second day, the ECG flatlined and remained like that until about 30 minutes before the pit was scheduled to be opened on the last day. The astonished researchers who’d been monitoring the yogi - whose core temperature had dropped four degrees in the pit - were sure that something was wrong with their equipment, but couldn’t find any malfunction or explanation besides the yogi’s heart stopping or decreasing in electrical activity below a recordable level.

It looks like our bodies have some of the abilities needed for hibernation. But like we said already, we’ve never had to, so our bodies aren’t completely adapted to the task. A few of the things holding us back are rather big obstacles. For example, researchers at the Paul Flechsig Institute for Brain Research in Leipzig discovered a few years ago that the brains of hibernating ground squirrels have brain cells containing modified proteins that are similar to those in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. The synapses that connect the brain’s neurons in both groups were also similarly degraded. The catch is that the squirrels’ brains bounce back after hibernation. They repair themselves and the animals show no signs of damage when they wake up in the spring, while human brains in the same state continue to deteriorate.

But hibernation on-demand would be useful to humans for reasons other than avoiding winter. Inducing hibernation in an accident victim on the way to the hospital could stave off extreme blood loss and cell breakdown, plus buy surgeons extra time to repair the injuries. It would also allow for the sort of space exploration that only seems possible in the movies. Placing astronauts in a dormant state, like in the Alien franchise, would allow them to sleep off the multiple years it would take for a spacecraft to travel to the outer reaches of the solar system and beyond.

Put to Bed

Researchers have been toying around with various ways to turn hibernation states “on” in animals over the last few years. Hydrogen sulfide seems to be one possible way to do that. By binding at the same cell sites as oxygen, the gaseous compound reduces the need for oxygen and depresses the metabolism. Mark Roth at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle induced hibernation for the first time in lab mice in 2005 by having them inhale large doses of a hydrogen sulfide gas. Their metabolic processes slowed, their temperatures dropped, and then they snapped right out of it when they got a big breath of oxygen hours later.

Surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital took a different approach in an experiment on Yorkshire pigs, to see how beneficial induced hibernation was in a trauma setting. After anesthetizing the pigs and giving them serious wounds that led to shock and extreme blood loss, the surgeons quickly chilled the pigs' bodies to 50ºF and pumped their veins full of a solution used for preserving transplant organs. At that point, the pigs were almost dead. They had little to no heartbeat, extremely reduced blood flow and no measurable electrical activity in the brain. The surgeons operated on the pigs and repaired their injuries. The pigs were revived when their temperatures were returned to normal and warm blood was pumped back in. The pigs bounced back with no noticeable physical or cognitive impairments.

While these are incredible breakthroughs and promising starts, we’re still a long way from making human hibernation simple, safe, and reliable. Other experiments failed to induce hibernation in sheep and pigs with hydrogen sulfide, so it might not work on larger animals, including us. Testing the Massachusetts method on humans, meanwhile, would be a bit tricky, ethically speaking. It’s a start, though, and sooner or later we might move beyond mere sleep and hibernate our way through surgery, or a flight to Jupiter.

What's the Difference Between Memorial Day and Veterans Day?

iStock/flySnow
iStock/flySnow

It may not be easy for some people to admit, but certain national holidays often get a little muddled—namely, Memorial Day and Veterans Day. In fact, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs sees the confusion often enough that they spelled out the distinction on their website. The two days are held six months apart: Veterans Day is celebrated every November 11, and Memorial Day takes place on the last Monday of May as part of a three-day weekend with parades and plenty of retail sales promotions. You probably realize both are intended to acknowledge the contributions of those who have served in the United States military, but you may not recall the important distinction between the two. So what's the difference?

Veterans Day was originally known as Armistice Day. It was first observed on November 11, 1919, the one-year anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution making it an annual observance in 1926. It became a national holiday in 1938. In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower changed the name from Armistice Day to Veterans Day to recognize veterans of the two world wars. The intention is to celebrate all military veterans, living or dead, who have served the country, with an emphasis on thanking those in our lives who have spent time in uniform.

We also celebrate military veterans on Memorial Day, but the mood is more somber. The occasion is reserved for those who died while serving their country. The day was first observed in the wake of the Civil War, where local communities organized tributes around the gravesites of fallen soldiers. The observation was originally called Decoration Day because the graves were adorned with flowers. It was held May 30 because that date wasn't the anniversary for any battle in particular and all soldiers could be honored. (The date was recognized by northern states, with southern states choosing different days.) After World War I, the day shifted from remembering the fallen in the Civil War to those who had perished in all of America's conflicts. It gradually became known as Memorial Day and was declared a federal holiday and moved to the last Monday in May to organize a three-day weekend beginning in 1971.

The easiest way to think of the two holidays is to consider Veterans Day a time to shake the hand of a veteran who stood up for our freedoms. Memorial Day is a time to remember and honor those who are no longer around to receive your gratitude personally.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, send it to bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

What Is the Kitchen Like on the International Space Station?

iStock/Elen11
iStock/Elen11

Clayton C. Anderson:

The International Space Station (ISS) does not really have a "kitchen" as many of us here on Earth might relate to. But, there is an area called the "galley" which serves the purpose of allowing for food preparation and consumption. I believe the term "galley" comes from the military, and it was used specifically in the space shuttle program. I guess it carried over to the ISS.

The Russian segment had the ONLY galley when I flew in 2007. There was a table for three, and the galley consisted of a water system—allowing us to hydrate our food packages (as needed) with warm (tepid) or hot (extremely) water—and a food warmer. The food warmer designed by the Russians was strictly used for their cans of food (about the size of a can of cat food in America). The U.S. developed a second food warmer (shaped like a briefcase) that we could use to heat the more "flexibly packaged" foodstuffs (packets) sent from America.

Later in the ISS lifetime, a second galley area was provided in the U.S. segment. It is positioned in Node 1 (Unity) and a table is also available there for the astronauts' dining pleasures. Apparently, it was added because of the increasing crew size experienced these days (6), to have more options. During my brief visit to ISS in 2010 (12 days or so) as a Discovery crewmember, I found the mealtimes to be much more segregated than when I spent five months on board. The Russians ate in the Russian segment. The shuttle astronauts ate in the shuttle. The U.S. ISS astronauts ate in Node 1, but often at totally different times. While we did have a combined dinner in Node 1 during STS-131 (with the Expedition 23 crew), this is one of the perceived negatives of the "multiple-galley" scenario. My long duration stint on ISS was highlighted by the fact that Fyodor Yurchikhin, Oleg Kotov, and I had every single meal together. The fellowship we—or at least I—experienced during those meals is something I will never, ever forget. We laughed, we argued, we celebrated, we mourned …, all around our zero-gravity "dinner table." Awesome stuff!

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

Clayton "Astro Clay" Anderson is an astronaut, motivational speaker, author, and STEAM education advocate.

His award-winning book The Ordinary Spaceman, Astronaut Edition Fisher Space Pen, and new children's books A is for Astronaut; Blasting Through the Alphabet and It's a Question of Space: An Ordinary Astronaut's Answers to Sometimes Extraordinary Questions are available at www.AstroClay.com. For speaking events www.AstronautClayAnderson.com. Follow @Astro_Clay #WeBelieveInAstronauts

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