Is It Bad to Use the Same Plastic Water Bottle Every Day?

istock.com/avi_gamliel
istock.com/avi_gamliel

If you’re not washing it, then yeah, it can get kind of gross. Reusing an unwashed bottle or cup, even if you’re “only” drinking water out of it, puts your mouth in intimate contact with a wonderful bacterial breeding ground.

Bacteria grow really well in moist, warm environments. While almost any similar container will suffice, a narrow-mouthed plastic water bottle is difficult to scrub and especially friendly to bacterial growth. In a 2003 study, Canadian researchers collected samples from children’s water bottles and found that almost two-thirds contained bacterial contamination that exceeded safe drinking water guidelines. While the study couldn’t pinpoint the source of the contamination, the researchers thought that the bacteria most likely simply made the leap from the students’ hands to the bottles and set up shop.

So, you have to vanquish the bacteria between uses, but here’s the snag to washing your bottle: cleaning the things might actually make them unsafe in a different way. Bisphenol A or BPA is a chemical compound used in the making of polycarbonate plastics, including some kinds of plastic bottles. It mimics estrogen and binds to the same receptors in the human body as natural hormones. Over the years, it’s been linked to everything from cancer cell growth and decreased sperm count to developmental and neurological issues.

When you give a bottle a good scrub, you’re wearing down the plastic and allowing BPA and other chemicals to leach from it and into the bottle’s contents. Using the bottles for hot liquids, putting them in the dishwasher, and trying to sterilize them with boiling water all do the same thing. Dr. Scott Belcher, a pharmacolgist at the University of Cincinnati, has done several studies on BPA in bottles and found that heat is a big factor in its release. One study showed that when BPA-containing drinking bottles are exposed to boiling water, the chemical is released 15 to 55 times faster than normal. “These are fantastic products and they work well,” Belcher told Scientific American. “[But] based on my knowledge of the scientific data, there is reason for caution. I have made a decision for myself not to use them."

As for the alternative to polycarbonate plastics, PET, the jury is largely still out on how safe it is. The contents of the bottle and the temperature at which it’s stored and washed both seem to influence the amount of plastic components leaching from it and the rate at which they leach (Update: Just a few of the relevant studies on bottles from both the US and Europe can be found here, here, here and here.) At the very least, solar water disinfection appears safe (depending on where the bottle came from), if a little inconvenient.

So what's a person to do to avoid illness from both creepy crawlies and plastic components? Regularly-washed glass, stainless steel or aluminum water bottles seem to be the way to go. They’re dishwasher-safe and easier to clean, providing less favorable breeding grounds for germs. They’re also chemically safe, according to one of Belcher’s most recent studies.

Pioneering Heart Surgeon René Favaloro Is Being Honored With a Google Doodle

Dr. René Favaloro (left) pictured with colleague Dr. Mason Sones.
Dr. René Favaloro (left) pictured with colleague Dr. Mason Sones.
The Cleveland Clinic Center for Medical Art & Photography, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 4.0

Argentinian heart surgeon René Favaloro is the subject of today’s Google Doodle, which features a sketched portrait of the doctor along with an anatomical heart and several medical tools, The Independent reports.

The renowned doctor was born on this day in 1923 in La Plata, the capital of Argentina’s Buenos Aires province, and pursued a degree in medicine at La Plata University. After 12 years as a doctor in La Pampa, where he established the area’s first mobile blood bank, trained nurses, and built his own operating room, Favaloro relocated to the U.S. to specialize in thoracic surgery at the Cleveland Clinic.

In 1967, Favaloro performed coronary bypass surgery on a 51-year-old woman whose right coronary artery was blocked, restricting blood flow to her heart. Coronary bypass surgery involves taking a healthy vein from elsewhere in the body (in this case, Favaloro borrowed from the patient’s leg, but you can also use a vein from the arm or chest), and using it to channel the blood from the artery to the heart, bypassing the blockage. According to the Mayo Clinic, it doesn’t cure whatever heart disease that caused the blocked artery, but it can relieve symptoms like chest pain and shortness of breath, and it gives patients time to make other lifestyle changes to further manage their disease.

Favaloro wasn’t keen on being called the “father” of coronary bypass surgery, but his work brought the procedure to the forefront of the clinical field. He moved back to Argentina in 1971 and launched the Favaloro Foundation to train surgeons and treat a variety of patients from diverse economic backgrounds.

Favaloro died by suicide on July 29, 2000, at the age of 77, by a gunshot wound to the chest. His wife had died several years prior, and his foundation had fallen deeply into debt, which Argentinian hospitals and medical centers declined to help pay, The New York Times reported at the time.

“As a surgeon, Dr. Favaloro will be remembered for his ingenuity and imagination,” his colleague Dr. Denton A. Cooley wrote in a tribute shortly after Favaloro’s death. “But as a man ... he will be remembered for his compassion and selflessness.” Today would have been his 96th birthday.

[h/t The Independent]

A Simple Way to Cure Brain Freeze Quickly

vitapix/iStock via Getty Images
vitapix/iStock via Getty Images

As one of life’s simple pleasures, ice cream should not have the capacity to cause spontaneous and agonizing pain immediately after ingestion. Yet ice cream and other extremely cold food frequently catches us off-guard by inciting what is known as “brain freeze” or “ice cream headache.” Fortunately, there’s a way to alleviate this harsh side effect.

According to Johns Hopkins University, a bout of radiating pain in your head after eating cold food is known as cold neuralgia or sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia. It’s likely caused by your body entering survival mode when it detects a freezing temperature on the palate (roof) of the mouth: our system constricts blood vessels in the palate to preserve our core temperature. When they rapidly open back up, a pain signal is sent to the brain via the trigeminal nerve. Since that nerve leads directly to the midface and forehead, your face bears the brunt of the referred pain from the mouth.

A brain freeze typically lasts less than five minutes. But when your head is throbbing, that can feel like forever. To minimize the pain, the best strategy is to warm the palate up. You can do this by pressing your tongue or a thumb against the roof of your mouth, by drinking a warm liquid, or both. Covering your face and breathing into your hands can also warm the air inside your mouth that was chilled by the ice cream.

If you want to take preventive measures, avoid gulping cold drinks and take smaller bites. Holding the ice cream in your mouth to warm it before swallowing can also reduce the potential for a painful end to your cone or slushy drink.

[h/t Johns Hopkins Medicine]

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