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Is It Bad to Use the Same Plastic Water Bottle Every Day?

If you’re not washing it, then yeah, it can get kind of gross. Reusing an unwashed bottle or cup, even if you’re “only” drinking water out of it, puts your mouth in intimate contact with a wonderful bacterial breeding ground.

Bacteria grow really well in moist, warm environments. While almost any similar container will suffice, a narrow-mouthed plastic water bottle is difficult to scrub and especially friendly to bacterial growth. In a 2003 study, Canadian researchers collected samples from children’s water bottles and found that almost two-thirds contained bacterial contamination that exceeded safe drinking water guidelines. While the study couldn’t pinpoint the source of the contamination, the researchers thought that the bacteria most likely simply made the leap from the students’ hands to the bottles and set up shop.

So, you have to vanquish the bacteria between uses, but here’s the snag to washing your bottle: cleaning the things might actually make them unsafe in a different way. Bisphenol A or BPA is a chemical compound used in the making of polycarbonate plastics, including some kinds of plastic bottles. It mimics estrogen and binds to the same receptors in the human body as natural hormones. Over the years, it’s been linked to everything from cancer cell growth and decreased sperm count to developmental and neurological issues.

When you give a bottle a good scrub, you’re wearing down the plastic and allowing BPA and other chemicals to leach from it and into the bottle’s contents. Using the bottles for hot liquids, putting them in the dishwasher, and trying to sterilize them with boiling water all do the same thing. Dr. Scott Belcher, a pharmacolgist at the University of Cincinnati, has done several studies on BPA in bottles and found that heat is a big factor in its release. One study showed that when BPA-containing drinking bottles are exposed to boiling water, the chemical is released 15 to 55 times faster than normal. “These are fantastic products and they work well,” Belcher told Scientific American. “[But] based on my knowledge of the scientific data, there is reason for caution. I have made a decision for myself not to use them."

As for the alternative to polycarbonate plastics, PET, the jury is largely still out on how safe it is. The contents of the bottle and the temperature at which it’s stored and washed both seem to influence the amount of plastic components leaching from it and the rate at which they leach (Update: Just a few of the relevant studies on bottles from both the US and Europe can be found here, here, here and here.) At the very least, solar water disinfection appears safe (depending on where the bottle came from), if a little inconvenient.

So what's a person to do to avoid illness from both creepy crawlies and plastic components? Regularly-washed glass, stainless steel or aluminum water bottles seem to be the way to go. They’re dishwasher-safe and easier to clean, providing less favorable breeding grounds for germs. They’re also chemically safe, according to one of Belcher’s most recent studies.

Water bottles image via Shutterstock

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What Pop Culture Gets Wrong About Dissociative Identity Disorder
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From the characters in Fight Club to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, popular culture is filled with "split" personalities. These dramatic figures might be entertaining, but they're rarely (if ever) scientifically accurate, SciShow Psych's Hank Green explains in the channel's latest video. Most representations contribute to a collective misunderstanding of dissociative identity disorder, or DID, which was once known as multiple personality disorder.

Experts often disagree about DID's diagnostic criteria, what causes it, and in some cases, whether it exists at all. Many, however, agree that people with DID don't have multiple figures living inside their heads, all clamoring to take over their body at a moment's notice. Those with DID do have fragmented personalities, which can cause lapses of memory, psychological distress, and impaired daily function, among other side effects.

Learn more about DID (and what the media gets wrong about mental illness) by watching the video below.

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History
Scientists Reveal Long-Hidden Text in Alexander Hamilton Letter
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Age, deterioration, and water damage are just a few of the reasons historians can be short on information that was once readily available on paper. Sometimes, it’s simply a case of missing pages. Other times, researchers can see “lost” text right under their noses.

One example: a letter written by Alexander Hamilton to his future wife, Elizabeth Schuyler, on September 6, 1780. On the surface, it looked very much like a rant about a Revolutionary War skirmish in Camden, South Carolina. But Hamilton scholars were excited by the 14 lines of writing in the first paragraph that had been crossed out. If they could be read, they might reveal some new dimension to one of the better-known Founding Fathers.

Using the practice of multispectral imaging—sometimes called hyperspectral imaging—conservationists at the Library of Congress were recently able to shine a new light on what someone had attempted to scrub out. In multispectral imaging, different wavelengths of light are “bounced” off the paper to reveal (or hide) different ink pigments. By examining a document through these different wavelengths, investigators can tune in to faded or obscured handwriting and make it visible to the naked eye.

A hyperspectral image of Alexander Hamilton's handwriting
Hyperspectral imaging of Hamilton's handwriting, from being obscured (top) to isolated and revealed (bottom).
Library of Congress

The text revealed a more emotional and romantic side to Hamilton, who had used the lines to woo Elizabeth. Technicians uncovered most of what he had written, with words in brackets still obscured and inferred:

Do you know my sensations when I see the
sweet characters from your hand? Yes you do,
by comparing [them] with your [own]
for my Betsey [loves] me and is [acquainted]
with all the joys of fondness. [Would] you
[exchange] them my dear for any other worthy
blessings? Is there any thing you would put
in competition[,] with one glowing [kiss] of
[unreadable], anticipate the delights we [unreadable]
in the unrestrained intercourses of wedded love,
and bet your heart joins mine in [fervent]
[wishes] to heaven that [all obstacles] and [interruptions]
May [be] speedily [removed].

Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler married on December 14, 1780. So why did Hamilton try and hide such romantic words during or after their courtship? He probably didn’t. Historians believe that his son, John Church Hamilton, crossed them out before publishing the letter as a part of a book of his father’s correspondence. He may have considered the passage a little too sexy for mass consumption.

[h/t Library of Congress]

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