Morning Cup of Links: Things that Resemble the Death Star

The Brangelina twins and People Magazine share the record for the largest monetary transaction ($14 million) for celebrity baby photos.
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May the 4th be with you! Begin your Star Wars Day with this run down of six things that look like the Death Star.
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The more you know: iPod chargers can open beer bottles.
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What does YKK mean? Meet the mysterious Japanese company behind the world's best zippers.
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At 113 feet, Nemo 33 in Belgium is the deepest indoor diving pool on the planet.
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The USC Trojans remember Junior Seau. Rest in peace.
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During a rare interview at a university in Madrid, hip hop artist MF Doom explains that Geedorah, one of his "characters," is a 300-foot reptilian villain.
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During his show in Newark this week, Bruce Springsteen paid tribute to The Band's late drummer Levon Helm with his bittersweet cover of "The Weight."
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In Ghostbusters merchandising news, the new Slimer plush toy is absolutely adorable until it makes the most heinous sounds imaginable.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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