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Morning Cup of Links: The Onion Challenge

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Today LIFE.com is featuring previously unpublished photos of Hitler's Bunker and the ruins of Berlin.
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Anchorman director Adam McKay wants to remake the 1974 Bill Cosby slapstick comedy Uptown Saturday Night.
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A young man from the Bronx proves his bravery after eating a whole onion on webcam. With jelly.
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The Gill Sans font was first drafted at some time between the years 1928 and 1933. It looked like this.
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Albuquerque police charged this hot dog vendor with aggravated assault after he ran over a competing hot dog vendor with his own hot dog cart.
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Duncan Hines was no chef. He just traveled so much for his day job that he became a dining expert on the open road.
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Scientists in Wales discovered after recent tests that chewing gum may cause short-term memory loss.
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A swarm of jellyfish-like invertebrates managed to shut down a nuclear power plant in California.
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Researchers at Northwestern University claim left-handers are the result of an inherent "competition in human evolution."
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Got 20 minutes? String theorist Brian Greene gives a pretty compelling argument why a multiverse might exist.
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Lego fans are pushing for this fan's Back to the Future III model to become an actual play set.
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In case you missed it: The nine best moments from the White House Correspondents' Dinner.

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College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
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One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

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North America: East or West Coast?
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