Morning Cup of Links: Do the Carlton

Jim C. Hines, who earlier threw his back out posing like women on book covers, has recovered enough to try it again, this time posing like men on book covers.
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Living in the spotlight means you automatically smile for the camera, even when it's a police mugshot. See a gallery of celebrities who don't drop the smile even in the worst circumstances.
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Google announced its latest service: online file storage. If it proves popular, our free storage days at Gmail and Blogger may soon end.
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Alfonso Ribeiro channeled Carlton Banks as he led a flash mob in a dance routine. Why yes, they did the Carlton dance ...how did you guess?
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The Speedy Greedy Hamster. It's a classic Tom and Jerry cartoon in real life!
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James Cameron and Peter Jackson are working on making 48 frames per second the new standard in film production. The Hobbit is being shot that way, but a test audience didn't like it at all.
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The Wondrous World of Aquascaping. It's like making an aquarium into a garden of art.
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This frog is just sitting there, doing his Kermit impression. Or maybe he's working on his other human capabilities in order to take over while we're sleeping.
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The heart-tugging Olympic-themed ads are starting already. Proctor and Gamble's ad for Mother's Day made me tear up and wish my kids had athletic ambitions.
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California voters may abolish the death penalty this fall, because this time it's all about economics. The state would save tens of millions of dollars every year by getting rid of death row.
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10 Horribly Misspelled Album Titles. Zappa is the obvious winner here.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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