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The Weird Week in Review

Facebook Photo Leads to Arrest

Michael Baker of Jenkins, Kentucky, siphoned gas from a police cruiser. The evidence was a picture of Baker doing the deed, while giving a one-finger salute. The 20-year-old posted the photo on his Facebook page and word spread locally until the Jenkins Police Department saw the picture. Baker was arrested and charged with unlawful taking. The police now plan to install locking gas caps.

Naked at the Airport

John Brennan decided to save TSA workers at Portland International Airport some time by taking all his clothing off. The 50-year-old businessman was told that he tested positive for explosives after going through a metal detector and a pat down. He felt humiliated, and said he stripped down as a protest. Brennan had previously taken part in Portland's nude bike ride, and so was no stranger to exposure. Two screening lanes were shut down during the incident. TSA officers called police, who took Brennan to jail. The linked story contains a censored video.

Lottery Winner Charged with Welfare Fraud

Amanda Clayton of Lincoln Park, Michigan, won a million-dollar lottery last year and collected a $735,000 lump sum. However, the 25-year-old mother continued to draw food stamps and public medical benefits for eight months, until a Detroit TV station investigated. On camera, Clayton said she was entitled to the benefits because she didn't have a job. However, recipients of public aid are supposed to inform the state of any change in income. Clayton was arrested on fraud charges Monday, and pleaded not guilty. Last week, Michigan enacted a new law requiring the lottery to inform the Human Services Department when anyone wins more than a thousand dollars, as this is the second time a winner has continued to collect benefits in the state. That they know of.

Wanted Man Turns Himself In for Reward

Taliban commander Mohammad Ashan saw his face on a wanted poster and noted the reward was $100. So he grabbed one and went to a police checkpoint in the district of Sar Howza, Afghanistan, where he demanded the reward. Afghan officials arrested him instead. He was wanted for plotting attacks on Afghan security forces.

When U.S. troops went to confirm that Ashan had in fact come forward to claim the finder’s fee, they were initially incredulous.

“We asked him, ‘Is this you?’ Mohammad Ashan answered with an incredible amount of enthusiasm, ‘Yes, yes, that’s me! Can I get my award now?’” recalled SPC Matthew Baker.

A biometric scan confirmed that the man in Afghan custody was the insurgent they had been looking for.

“This guy is the Taliban equivalent of the ‘Home Alone” burglars,” one U.S. official said.

$10,000 Lemonade Stand

When life hands you lemons, you're supposed to make lemonade. Six-year-old Drew Cox did just that. Drew's father, Randy Cox of Gladewater, Texas, underwent chemotherapy to treat cancer. Drew wanted to help with the thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket expenses, so he set up a lemonade stand in front of his home last Saturday. He charged 25 cents a cup, but then word spread about Drew's project. People started coming in from all over, paying more than the asking price. One person paid with a $5,000 check! By the end of the day, Drew's lemonade had brought in over $10,000.

Tomato on Hamburger Leads to Knuckle Sandwich

Michael Ogborn ordered a hamburger without tomato at a Sonic outlet in Vero Beach, Florida. When his burger arrived with a tomato slice on it, he complained to the manager, who refunded his money. But then Ogborn punched the manager in the face. When police arrived, Ogborn said the manager had spit on his shoes before the punch. Nevertheless, the tomato-hater was arrested on charges of misdemeanor battery.

Man Holds Up Store with Hot Dog Tongs

Police in Fort Smith, Arkansas, were called to a convenience store when a man started threatening employees and customers with a pair of hot dog tongs. Renee Jackson was reportedly intoxicated when he grabbed the tongs from a food counter and demanded money. No one took the threat seriously, though, and Jackson got nothing. After police arrived, Jackson said he wanted to be jailed to see how his family did without him. He said they don't appreciate him. Jackson had been fighting with his wife before the incident. He now faces two counts of attempted robbery.

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Little Baby's Ice Cream
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Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
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Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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travel
Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
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iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

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