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10 Cool Bridges from Around the World

1. The Moses Bridge, Netherlands

Designed by architecture group RO & AD, The Moses Bridge is constructed out of Accoya wood, a hi-tech wood that is supposedly harder and more durable than some of the best tropical woods. It is treated with a nontoxic anti-fungal coating to maintain its split-the-water functionality.


2. Da Vinci Bridge, Norway

A bridge designed by Leonardo da Vinci to span the Golden Horn in Istanbul has been built some 500 years later! Wild, right? The bridge now spans a motorway in the less exotic setting of Aas, a small town 20 miles north of Oslo, Norway. However, it is the first major civil engineering project to be built from da Vinci's drawings. Da Vinci first sketched the bridge for Sultan Bajazet II, but none of the Sultan’s engineers thought it could be done!

3. Henderson Waves, Singapore


This nearly 900-foot pedestrian bridge is the highest of its kind in Singapore, connecting two parks. The bridge has a wave-form made up of seven undulating curved steel ribs that alternately rise over and under its deck. The curved ribs form alcoves that function as shelters with seats within.

4. The Gateshead Millennium Bridge, England


The Gateshead Millennium Bridge is sometimes referred to as the 'Blinking Eye Bridge' or the 'Winking Eye Bridge' due to its shape and its tilting method. It’s a pedestrian and cyclist tilt bridge spanning the River Tyne in England. Definitely one I need to check out ASAP. Such fun!

5. Rolling Bridge, England


This 39-foot timber and steel bridge was built in 2004 to act as a walkway over a small section of London's Grand Union Canal. An innovative hydraulic system in the bridge's handrail allows it to retract and curl into an octagon, which it does every Friday at noon.

6. Slauerhoffbrug, Netherlands

The Slauerhoffbrug, located in Leeuwarden, was designed by Van Driel Mechatronica and is a fully automatic bridge with the ability to sense and adapt to its surroundings. It’s very Terminator-like in its ability to quickly sense and transform to the position needed, allowing ships to pass. You definitely don't want to get on this bridge's bad side! :-)

7. The Juscelino Kubitschek Bridge , Brazil


Architect Alexandre Chan and structural engineer Mario Vila Verde, both from Rio de Janeiro, entered the idea of this bridge into a competition aiming to solve the problem of closing the gap between commuters and their homes. According to Chan, the idea was “to create a landmark for the enjoyment of the community as much as to simply traverse a body of water.”

8. The Millau Viaduct, France

Designed by French structural engineer Michel Virlogeux and British architect Norman Foster, the Millau Viaduct is the 12th highest bridge in the world, at 890 ft above the road deck.

9. Pythonbrug, Amsterdam

If you’re wondering why you don’t see such works of art stateside, that’s because such a design wouldn't pass muster under the Americans With Disabilities Act, which sets a 5 percent limit on the grade of such structures. Well that, and maybe we don’t have the guts to build such a forward thinking structure? Yes, that’s a challenge folks!

10. Oresund Bridge, Sweden

The Oresund Bridge crosses the Oresund strait and joins Sweden with Denmark. It begins as a cable-stayed bridge in Sweden and ends as a tunnel in Denmark. A small artificial island was built around the tunnel's entrance to keep water from creeping in.

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History
The Secret World War II History Hidden in London's Fences

In South London, the remains of the UK’s World War II history are visible in an unlikely place—one that you might pass by regularly and never take a second look at. In a significant number of housing estates, the fences around the perimeter are actually upcycled medical stretchers from the war, as the design podcast 99% Invisible reports.

During the Blitz of 1940 and 1941, the UK’s Air Raid Precautions department worked to protect civilians from the bombings. The organization built 60,000 steel stretchers to carry injured people during attacks. The metal structures were designed to be easy to disinfect in case of a gas attack, but that design ended up making them perfect for reuse after the war.

Many London housing developments at the time had to remove their fences so that the metal could be used in the war effort, and once the war was over, they were looking to replace them. The London County Council came up with a solution that would benefit everyone: They repurposed the excess stretchers that the city no longer needed into residential railings.

You can tell a stretcher railing from a regular fence because of the curves in the poles at the top and bottom of the fence. They’re hand-holds, designed to make it easier to carry it.

Unfortunately, decades of being exposed to the elements have left some of these historic artifacts in poor shape, and some housing estates have removed them due to high levels of degradation. The Stretcher Railing Society is currently working to preserve these heritage pieces of London infrastructure.

As of right now, though, there are plenty of stretchers you can still find on the streets. If you're in the London area, this handy Google map shows where you can find the historic fencing.

[h/t 99% Invisible]

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Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images
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This Just In
For $61, You Can Become a Co-Owner of This 13th-Century French Castle
Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images
Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images

A cultural heritage restoration site recently invited people to buy a French castle for as little as $61. The only catch? You'll be co-owning it with thousands of other donors. Now thousands of shareholders are responsible for the fate of the Château de la Mothe-Chandeniers in western France, and there's still room for more people to participate.

According to Mashable, the dilapidated structure has a rich history. Since its construction in the 13th century, the castle has been invaded by foreign forces, looted, renovated, and devastated by a fire. Friends of Château de la Mothe-Chandeniers, a small foundation formed in 2016 in an effort to conserve the overgrown property, want to see the castle restored to its former glory.

Thanks to a crowdfunding collaboration with the cultural heritage restoration platform Dartagnans, the group is closer than ever to realizing its mission. More than 9000 web users have contributed €51 ($61) or more to the campaign to “adopt” Mothe-Chandeniers. Now that the original €500,000 goal has been fulfilled, the property’s new owners are responsible for deciding what to do with their purchase.

“We intend to create a dedicated platform that will allow each owner to monitor the progress of works, events, project proposals and build a real collaborative and participatory project,” the campaign page reads. “To make an abandoned ruin a collective work is the best way to protect it over time.”

Even though the initial goal has been met, Dartagnans will continue accepting funds for the project through December 25. Money collected between now and then will be used to pay for various fees related to the purchase of the site, and new donors will be added to the growing list of owners.

The shareholders will be among the first to see the cleared-out site during an initial visit next spring. The rest of the public will have to wait until it’s fully restored to see the final product.

[h/t Mashable]

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