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Morning Cup of Links: Caveman Fit

27 Toys You Threw Out That Are Worth a Fortune Now. Of course, you didn't have much choice after you wore them out and broke them down.
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A. J. Jacobs tells us how to get fit like a caveman in an excerpt from his new book Drop Dead Healthy. The caveman workout involves taking your shoes off and running as if a dangerous predator is chasing you.
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Do you need help making enough sushi rolls for your family? Sushibot is a Japanese (of course) robot that can produce 400 sushi rolls an hour!
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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton submitted an image macro to the Tumble blog Texts from Hillary. The stunt was confirmed as real when she met with the site's founders to autograph the picture.
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The 16th annual Webby Award nominees have been announced.
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Many of the call-ins on Frasier's radio show were celebrity voices. If you didn't recognize them on TV, this video has them labeled.
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Too cute for words: five adorable animals in the Smithsonian Photo Exhibit. How often do you see a fox blowing a raspberry?
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The Most Obnoxious Generation: An American Reunion Review. Although shocking in its Generation Y nostalgia, the sequel appears to be better than American Pie.
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Inside the super-sized life of TLC's Duggar family. With 18 children at home, they spend more on groceries than most Americans earn in a month.
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The Men Behind Your Favorite Liquors. These are the guys you'd invite to a party, and hope they bring refreshments!

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Big Questions
What's the Difference Between Vanilla and French Vanilla Ice Cream?
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While you’re browsing the ice cream aisle, you may find yourself wondering, “What’s so French about French vanilla?” The name may sound a little fancier than just plain ol’ “vanilla,” but it has nothing to do with the origin of the vanilla itself. (Vanilla is a tropical plant that grows near the equator.)

The difference comes down to eggs, as The Kitchn explains. You may have already noticed that French vanilla ice cream tends to have a slightly yellow coloring, while plain vanilla ice cream is more white. That’s because the base of French vanilla ice cream has egg yolks added to it.

The eggs give French vanilla ice cream both a smoother consistency and that subtle yellow color. The taste is a little richer and a little more complex than a regular vanilla, which is made with just milk and cream and is sometimes called “Philadelphia-style vanilla” ice cream.

In an interview with NPR’s All Things Considered in 2010—when Baskin-Robbins decided to eliminate French Vanilla from its ice cream lineup—ice cream industry consultant Bruce Tharp noted that French vanilla ice cream may date back to at least colonial times, when Thomas Jefferson and George Washington both used ice cream recipes that included egg yolks.

Jefferson likely acquired his taste for ice cream during the time he spent in France, and served it to his White House guests several times. His family’s ice cream recipe—which calls for six egg yolks per quart of cream—seems to have originated with his French butler.

But everyone already knew to trust the French with their dairy products, right?

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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science
Belly Flop Physics 101: The Science Behind the Sting
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Belly flops are the least-dignified—yet most painful—way of making a serious splash at the pool. Rarely do they result in serious physical injury, but if you’re wondering why an elegant swan dive feels better for your body than falling stomach-first into the water, you can learn the laws of physics that turn your soft torso a tender pink by watching the SciShow’s video below.

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