CLOSE

9-Year-Old's Homemade Arcade is Rad

9-year-old Caine Monroy loved arcades, so he built one in his father's auto parts shop in East LA. He made it out of cardboard and packing tape. The games include arcade-machine versions of soccer, basketball, and even a claw game. The "machines" dispense tickets (Caine has to roll them out a slot) and arcade patrons can then choose prizes, just like at a traditional arcade. In this short film, the first purchaser of Caine's "Fun Pass" ($2 for 500 plays) shows us the arcade, and a very special day for Caine's business. If this doesn't leave you grinning, I don't know what will.

Geekiest part: creative use of the Square Root key ("the checkmark" as Caine calls it) on the calculators.

For more on the film, check out its website. The film's creators are trying to raise $25,000 for Caine's college fund. In just a few days, they're already $10,000 of the way there. If you're in LA, and it's a Saturday, you can go play at Caine's Arcade.

Update (five hours later): Caine's college fund has now exceeded $35,000; a new target of $100,000 had been set. Good job, internet.

(Via Boing Boing.)

Original image
Mattel
arrow
This Just In
Mattel Unveils New Uno Edition for Colorblind Players
Original image
Mattel

On the heels of International Colorblind Awareness Day, Mattel, which owns Uno, announced it would be unveiling a colorblind-friendly edition of the 46-year-old card game.

The updated deck is a collaboration with ColorADD, a global organization for colorblind accessibility and education. In place of its original color-dependent design, this new Uno will feature a small symbol next to each card's number that corresponds with its intended primary color.

As The Verge points out, Mattel is not actually the first to invent a card game for those with colorblindness. But this inclusive move is still pivotal: According to Fast Co. Design, Uno is currently the most popular noncollectible card game in the world. And with access being extended to the 350 million people globally and 13 million Americans who are colorblind, the game's popularity is sure to grow.

Mattel unveils color-friendly Uno deck
Mattel

[h/t: The Verge

Original image
iStock
arrow
fun
Lightning-Fast Teen Sets New Rubik’s Cube World Record
Original image
iStock

In less time than it takes some people to open a pickle jar, 15-year-old Patrick Ponce can solve a Rubik’s Cube. His total time of 4.69 seconds makes him the new holder of the world record for fastest 3-by-3 Rubik’s Cube completion, as highlighted by Compete (and seen in the video below).

Ponce achieved the impressive feat of dexterity at a tournament in Middletown, Virginia, on September 2. He takes the title from the previous Rubik’s Cube speed record holder, Feliks Zemdegs, who solved the puzzle in 4.73 seconds at a competition in Australia in December 2016.

But the teenager may not hold his new position at the top for very long: Expert Rubik's Cubers have been steadily lowering the speed record beneath the 5-second mark since 2015. And human competitors still have a long way to go before solving a cube in 0.887 seconds—that’s the record that was set by a robot in March of 2017.

[h/t Compete]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios