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20 TV Shows Recreated With Peeps

1. Downton Abbey

This diorama is titled The Peeple of Downton Abbey by Tonya and Angela of Maplewood, Minnesota. The dollhouse-inspired scene shows four different rooms with marshmallow characters.

The entire cast is lined up for their portrait in this version called Peepton Abbey by Caroline Chase, Valerie Boyle, and Daniel Boyle. There were more Downton Abbey scenes in Peeps than I could keep up with, but you can see a couple more good ones here and here.

2. The Walking Dead

The gruesome AMC show The Walking Dead makes a great diorama with the help of raspberry jelly and red licorice. This scene by Loren Sciurba of Alexandria shows Shane escaping a hoard by shooting Otis and leaving him to distract the zombies.

What detail! Other Walking Dead dioramas are found at the Denver Post and the Pioneer Press. And I like this one featuring Darrel with his crossbow, although I can't seem to find the original artist.

3. Pee Wee's Playhouse

Pee Wee's Playhouse was an ultra-colorful kids show that still looks good in candy. Rebecca Cohen and Emily Salomon made this scene.

4. Game of Thrones

Epicurious posted a series of Peep scenes illustrating the HBO series Game of Thrones.

5. The Simpsons

There are a lot of Peep versions of The Simpsons, as the yellow characters are easy to depict. The best photograph of a Simpsons scene in Peeps is from a student team consisting of John Dern, Kim Moore, Allegra Williams, Cady Clas, and sophomore Chelsea Burke. It was a semifinalist in the Washington Post contest in 2007.

6. Dexter

A Peepisode of Dexter is a Peeps version of the serial killer series Dexter. Another contest entry depicts the same scene.

7. The Voice

The Voice is a talent show that's overtaken American Idol in popularity. As you can see in this diorama from Megan Lowell, Jessica Doody, and Dana Lowell, the judges select the best voices without seeing what the contestants look like.

8. Real Housewives

A soap opera diorama was submitted to the Washington Post contest this year by Talula Cordero. There are several Real Housewives series, but this one was custom-titled The Real Peep Wives of Dupont Circle.

9. Iron Chef

Is a cooking competition show rendered in food just too meta? Iron Chef turned into Iron Peeps in this Washington Post entry by Nancy, Katie, and Julie Eggar. The accessories are dollhouse furniture or handmade from clay. See another version of the same show in the Denver Post competition.

10. Nip/Tuck

The plastic surgery drama Nip/Tuck was depicted in the 2009 diorama Peep/Tuck by Jennifer Storozuk, Kathleen Lyons, and Karen James.

11. Arrested Development

This title scene from Arrested Development was submitted to the Washington Post by thuytut.

12. The Price is Right

Game shows lend themselves well to Peeps, especially those with big, gaudy sets and contestants in costume, like The Price is Right. Kay Martinez, Maree Martinez, Stacey Rathbun, and Cynthia Abernathy created this in 2009. See this Peeps game in action at YouTube.

13. The Muppet Show

Muppets are colorful and tempting to recreate in miniature marshmallow form. Shown here are Muppets by Anna and Thalia Biglen. Another diorama has The Muppets posing in the show's opening sequence. Yet another version of the marshmallow Muppets is based on a movie, but it's worth a look.

14. Twin Peaks

Another submission to the Washington Post, this version of the David Lynch series Twin Peaks came from Hollys Bears.

15. The Monkees

A tribute to the 1960s TV series The Monkees was entered into the Pioneer Post competition by bboard61.

16. The Twilight Zone

The classic Twilight Zone episode "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet" starring a very young William Shatner inspired this Peeps scene by Allie Berg and Jonathan Herr in 2009. The black and white effect is part of the work; this was not altered after the photograph was taken.

17. Hee Haw

The long-running country music and comedy series Hee Haw becomes Peep Haw in this diorama. Karen McCoy's entry became a semifinalist in the 2007 Washington Post competition.

18. Swamp People

The series Swamp People is a reality show following the trials of bayou alligator hunters. In this scene from Michele Overton and Susan Anderson they are shown surrounded by marshmallows with hungry alligator faces. Another version showed up in the Pioneer Press competition.

19. Keeping Up with the Kardashians

Kim's wedding was memorialized in marshmallow, by Carolyn Polinsky and Emily Dunne. The title is, of course, Peeping Up with the Kardashians.

20. Batman

The 1960s TV series Batman is recreated here under the title Peepman and Boypeep Speed to the Peepmobile to Feed the Parking Meter. Liz Roberts made this in 2007 and made finalist in the WaPo contest. Note the "bat signal" that throws a Peep shape, and the parking meter showing its teeth!

See more Peeps dioramas at the Minneapolis/St. Paul Pioneer Press, the Dallas-Ft. Worth Star-Telegram, the Denver Post, and The Washington Post.

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Art
A Secret Room Full of Michelangelo's Sketches Will Soon Open in Florence
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

Parents all over the world have chastised their children for drawing on the walls. But when you're Michelangelo, you've got some leeway. According to The Local, the Medici Chapels, part of the Bargello museum in Florence, Italy, has announced that it plans to open a largely unseen room full of the artist's sketches to the public by 2020.

Roughly 40 years ago, curators of the chapels at the Basilica di San Lorenzo had a very Dan Brown moment when they discovered a trap door in a wardrobe leading to an underground room that appeared to have works from Michelangelo covering its walls. The tiny retreat is thought to be a place where the artist hid out in 1530 after upsetting the Medicis—his patrons—by joining a revolt against their control of Florence. While in self-imposed exile for several months, he apparently spent his time drawing on whatever surfaces were available.

A drawing by Michelangelo under the Medici Chapels in Florence
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

Museum officials previously believed the room and the charcoal drawings were too fragile to risk visitors, but have since had a change of heart, leading to their plan to renovate the building and create new attractions. While not all of the work is thought to be attributable to the famed artist, there's enough of it in the subterranean chamber—including drawings of Jesus and even recreations of portions of the Sistine Chapel—to make a trip worthwhile.

[h/t The Local]

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Art
15 Things You Should Know About Georgia O’Keeffe

Georgia O’Keeffe’s enchanting floral still lifes are now a deeply ingrained part of American culture—so much so that they often eclipse her other colorful accomplishments. For a more complete portrait of the artist, who was born 130 years ago today, brush up on these 15 little-known facts about her.

1. FLOWER PAINTINGS MAKE UP A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF O'KEEFFE'S BODY OF WORK.

Though O'Keeffe is most famous for her lovingly rendered close-ups of flowers—like Black Iris and Oriental Poppies—these make up just about 200 of her 2000-plus paintings. The rest primarily depict landscapes, leaves, rocks, shells, and bones.

2. SHE REJECTED SEXUAL INTERPRETATIONS OF HER PAINTINGS.

For decades, critics assumed that O'Keeffe's flowers were intended as homages—or at the very least, allusions—to the female form. But in 1943, she insisted that they had it all wrong, saying, “Well—I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flowers you hung all your own associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see of the flower—and I don’t.” So there.

3. SHE WAS NOT A NATIVE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST.


Joe Raedle/Getty Images

O'Keeffe was actually born on a Wisconsin dairy farm. She'd go on to live in Chicago; New York City; New York’s Lake George; Charlottesville, Virginia; and Amarillo, Texas. She first visited New Mexico in 1917, and as she grew older, her trips there became more and more frequent. Following the death of her husband in 1946, she moved to New Mexico permanently.

4. HER FAVORITE STUDIO WAS THE BACKSEAT OF A MODEL-A FORD.

In an interview with C-SPAN, Carolyn Kastner, curator of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, explained how the artist customized her car for this use: "She would remove the driver's seat. Then she would unbolt the passenger car, turn it around to face the back seat. Then she would lay the canvas on the back seat as an easel and paint inside her Model-A Ford."

Painting inside the car allowed O'Keeffe to stay out of the unrelenting desert sun, where she painted many of her later works. The Model-A also provided a barrier from the bees that would gather as the day wore on.

5. O'KEEFFE ALSO PAINTED SKYSCRAPERS.

While nature was her main source of inspiration, the time she spent in 1920s Manhattan spurred the creation of surreal efforts like New York With Moon, City Night and The Shelton with Sunspots.

6. O'KEEFFE IMMERSED HERSELF IN NATURE ...

While in New Mexico O’Keeffe spent summers and falls at her Ghost Ranch, putting up with the region's hottest, most stifling days in order to capture its most vivid colors. (The rest of the year she stayed at her second home, located in the small town of Abiquiu.) When she wasn't painting in her Model-A, O'Keeffe often camped out in the harsh surrounding terrain, to keep close to the landscapes that inspired her.

7. …WHATEVER THE WEATHER.

The artist would rig up tents from tarps, contend with unrelenting downpours, and paint with gloves on when it got too cold. She went camping well into her 70s and enjoyed a well-documented rafting trip with photographer Todd Webb at age 74. Her camping equipment is occasionally exhibited at the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe.

8. SHE MARRIED THE MAN BEHIND HER FIRST GALLERY SHOW.

"At last, a woman on paper!" That’s what modernist photographer and gallery owner Alfred Stieglitz cried when he first saw O'Keeffe's abstract charcoal drawings. He was so enthusiastic about this series of sketches that he put them on display—before consulting their creator.

When O'Keeffe arrived at his gallery, she wasn't pleased, and brusquely introduced herself: "I am Georgia O'Keeffe and you will have to take these pictures down." Despite their rocky beginnings, Stieglitz and O'Keeffe quickly made amends, and went on to become partners in art and in life.

9. O'KEEFFE AND STIEGLITZ WROTE 25,000 PAGES OF LOVE LETTERS TO EACH OTHER.

When the pair met in 1916, he was famous and married; she was unknown and 23 years his junior. All the same, they began writing to each other often (sometimes two or three times a day) and at length (as many as 40 pages at a time). These preserved writings chart the progression of their romance—from flirtation to affair to their marriage in 1924—and even document their marital struggles.

10. SHE SERVED AS A MUSE TO OTHER ARTISTS.

Thanks in part to Stieglitz, O'Keeffe was one of the most photographed women of the 20th century. Stieglitz made O'Keeffe the subject of a long-term series of portraits meant to capture individuals as they aged, and she made for a striking model. Though he died in 1946, the project lived on as other photographers sought out O'Keeffe in order to capture the beloved artist against the harsh New Mexican landscapes she loved so dearly.

O'Keeffe later wrote:

When I look over the photographs Stieglitz took of me—some of them more than sixty years ago—I wonder who that person is. It is as if in my one life I have lived many lives. If the person in the photographs were living in this world today, she would be quite a different person—but it doesn't matter—Stieglitz photographed her then.

11. SHE QUIT PAINTING THREE TIMES.

The first break spanned several years (the exact number is a matter of debate), when O'Keeffe took on more stable jobs to help her family through financial troubles. In the early 1930s, a nervous breakdown led to her hospitalization, and caused her to set aside her brushes for more than a year.

In the years leading up to her death in 1986, failing eyesight forced O'Keeffe to give up painting entirely. Until then, she fought hard to keep working, enlisting assistants to prepare her canvas and mix her oil paints for pieces like 1977's Sky Above Clouds/Yellow Horizon and Clouds. She managed to use watercolors until she was 95.

12. AFTER GOING BLIND, SHE TURNED TO SCULPTING.


By Alfred Stieglitz - Phillips, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Although her vision eventually made painting impossible, O'Keeffe's desire to create was not squelched. She memorably declared, "I can see what I want to paint. The thing that makes you want to create is still there.” O'Keeffe began experimenting with clay sculpting in her late 80s, and continued with it into her 96th year.

13. SHE'S THE MOTHER OF AMERICAN MODERNISM.

Searching for what she called “the Great American Thing,” O'Keeffe was part of the Stieglitz Circle, which included such lauded early modernists as Charles Demuth, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, John Marin, Paul Strand, and Edward Steichen. By the mid-1920s, she had become the first female painter to gain acclaim alongside her male contemporaries in New York's cutthroat art world. Her distinctive way of rendering nature in shapes and forms that made them seem simultaneously familiar and new earned her a reputation as a pioneer of the form.

14. SHE BLAZED NEW TRAILS FOR FEMALE ARTISTS.

In 1946, O’Keeffe became the first woman to earn a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art. Twenty-four years later, a Whitney Museum of American Art retrospective exhibit introduced her work to a new generation. Fifteen years after that, O'Keeffe was included in the inaugural slate of artists chosen to receive the newly founded National Medal of Arts for her contribution to American culture.

15. SHE WASN'T FEARLESS, BUT SHE REJECTED FEAR.

O'Keeffe was purported to have said, "I've been absolutely terrified every moment of my life and I've never let it keep me from doing a single thing I wanted to do."

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