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Morning Cup of Links: TV Mashups

Aung San Suu Kyi is the Nelson Mandela of Burma. If you don't know of her, you can catch up on the fearless Burmese opposition leader in an excerpt from the book The Lady and the Peacock.
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Amazon Founder Jeff Bezos wants to retrieve Apollo 11?s engines from the ocean floor. If he succeeds, they'll still belong to NASA, even 43 years later.
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Nick Berry of DataGenetics has calculated the best strategy for winning the game Hangman. You might think you know which letters to pick first to maximize your chance of guessing right, but there’s a lot more involved than you ever considered!
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When Social Networks and Body Image Collide. When strangers come together on sites like Pinterest, they can enable eating disorders, if not outright encourage them.
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Let's go eat at Downton Arby's. The perfect mashup for fans of British television and American fast food.
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An audit of working conditions at Foxconn plants, where iPhones and iPads are made, revealed violations of labor laws. No one was shocked, and the company plans to improve working conditions up to the legal Chinese standards.
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Gwen tried out for a position in the new field of data processing, and aced the test. That surprised many who assumed that a black woman could never be smart enough, but the machines didn't care who ran them.
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Skyrim Hoarders is another pop culture mashup. If you have even a passing familiarity with either part, you'll get a laugh out of how they're put together.
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8 ridiculous pop culture-inspired cookbooks. You, too, can learn to cook like a fictional character, or a fictional chef who cooks fictional food for fictional characters.
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Bizarre Vending Machines. Anything you want to sell can be automated somehow.

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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