What’s the Difference Between Scotch, Whiskey and Bourbon?

George Konig/Keystone Features/Getty Images
George Konig/Keystone Features/Getty Images

This might be common knowledge for some, but it's worth a refresher. Let's start with a burning question we answered back in 2008: what makes a whiskey bourbon?

The law. While knocking back a dram of bourbon is a decidedly carefree exercise, making it is exceedingly technical and requires that the whiskey meet a rigid set of criteria. The Federal Standards of Identity for Bourbon stipulate what is and what isn’t bourbon. For a whiskey to call itself bourbon, its mash, the mixture of grains from which the product is distilled, must contain at least 51% corn. (The rest of the mash is usually filled out with malted barley and either rye or wheat.) The mash must be distilled at 160 proof or less, put into the barrel at 125 proof or less, and it must not contain any additives. The distillate must be aged in a new charred oak barrel. (Most often these barrels are white oak, but they can be any variety of oak.) If you distill a whiskey in your kitchen that meets all of these standards, congrats, you’ve made bourbon. Also, you’ve broken the law; the ATF is probably outside your house right now.

The main difference between scotch and whisky is geographic, but also ingredients and spellings. Scotch is whisky made in Scotland, while bourbon is whiskey made in the U.S.A, generally Kentucky. Scotch is made mostly from malted barley, while bourbon is distilled from corn. If you’re in England and ask for a whisky, you’ll get Scotch. But in Ireland, you’ll get Irish whiskey (yep, they spell it differently for a little colour).

On this side of the pond, we have our own local color, too. The difference between Tennessee Whiskey, like Jack Daniel’s, for example, and Bourbon is that after the spirit is distilled, Tennessee Whiskey is filtered through sugar-maple charcoal. This filtering, known as the Lincoln County Process, is what distinguishes Tennessee Whiskey from your average Bourbon, like Jim Beam. The name, Bourbon, comes from an area known as Old Bourbon, around what is now Bourbon County, Kentucky.

On top of these types of whiskey, we also have Rye, which can refer either to American rye whiskey, which must be distilled from at least 51 percent rye or Canadian whisky, which may or may not actually include any rye in its production process. Confusing! Right?

Okay whiskey drinkers, did I miss anything crucial? Obviously there are tons of other, smaller differences depending on location and recipe, but that should cover you for when you need to impress the opposite sex at a bar some day.

Winston Churchill Had a Doctor's Note That Allowed Him to Drink an 'Indefinite' Amount of Alcohol in Prohibition-Era America

 Fox Photos/Getty Images
Fox Photos/Getty Images

Winston Churchill never went long without pouring himself a drink, even while traveling throughout Prohibition-era America. As producer and photographer Meredith Frost pointed out on Twitter recently, the future British prime minister and World War II leader got a doctor’s note in January 1932 which claimed he could drink an “indefinite” quantity of alcohol—federal laws be damned—to facilitate his “post-accident convalescence.” He had been struck by a car while on a speaking tour in New York in December 1931, which caused him chest pain in the immediate aftermath. He also suffered bouts of depression amid the aftershock, and it reportedly took him two months to fully recover.

Unfortunately for Churchill, Prohibition didn’t end until 1933. In fact, last week (December 5) marked the 85th anniversary of the repeal. He didn’t let that stop him, though. He admitted he once went to a speakeasy—"as a social investigator," of course.

This wasn’t the only time that Churchill refused to play by the rules insofar as alcohol was concerned. Once, after being told he shouldn’t drink or smoke during a meeting with a Muslim king, he replied through an interpreter, “My rule of life prescribed as an absolute sacred rite smoking cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after, and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them.”

However, several historical accounts have argued that Churchill's drinking was for show and that he wasn’t actually an alcoholic. “It has been said that Winston used alcohol as a prop to his persona, rather like the cigars and pet bulldog, and that he rarely got monkey-arsed, or reached the falling-down, slurred-words state,” author Robert Sellers writes in An A-Z of Hellraisers: A Comprehensive Compendium of Outrageous Insobriety. “Total inebriation was something he abhorred, which says much for what must have been a steel constitution.”

A California Winery Has Created a Vino-Filled Escape Room You May Never Want to Leave

iStock.com/skynesher
iStock.com/skynesher

If the thought of being locked in a room with your friends for an indeterminate amount of time makes you stressed, try adding a little wine to the mix. Chateau St. Jean, a winery located in California's Sonoma Valley, now hosts what may be the most luxurious escape room on Earth, as PureWow reports.

The escape-the-room experience, titled "Unlock the Chateau," gives groups of six to 12 people 60 minutes to solve a series of puzzles. The escape room is appropriately vino-themed, with players having to look in places like wine barrels to find clues in order to move on to the next room.

Each guest is given a complimentary glass of sparkling wine at the start of the challenge that they can sip as they play. And in case the game starts out too idyllic for players to ever want to leave, the promise of a second glass of wine after they unlock the second room and a full flight when they escape will surely keep them motivated.

Escape rooms aren't usually set in the most pleasant places: Madame Tussauds, for example, opened an escape room earlier this year that placed guests in a cell in Alcatraz. But for those looking for a more relaxing experience, you can book a reservation at Chateau St. Jean Monday through Friday for $60 a person.

[h/t PureWow]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER