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Weekend Links: The Least Helpful Things Found in Textbooks

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It was a favored pastime of mine, and I'm sure most of you, to ridicule the absurd drawings and bizarre quotes from school textbooks. But just because I'm out of school, the fun doesn't have to stop! Thanks to Matt, I now know about Thanks, Textbooks. The chuckling in the back of the room continues! (It's fairly new but I'm bookmarking it).
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"Tommy Edison has been blind since birth and now producing videos online that reveal a glimpse into his life and the challenges that he faces daily, such as what it’s like for someone who is blind to use an ATM." There are more movingly informative videos on Tommy's homepage, The Blind Film Critic.
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From Kristen, "Drum Corps is the NFL of marching bands - the best performers travel and compete all over the country each summer and it can be very physically demanding as this video demonstrates. In it, a tenor drummer has his vitals analyzed by a college professor during a rehearsal and we learn how hard the guy is working. It's pretty interesting!"
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So just how big are the eyes of a giant squid? On a scale of 1 to 10 I would say ... TERRIFYING!
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These pictures of golden fireflies in Japan do not look real. They also remind me of a really pretty version of the swarms of kudzu bugs we've been dealing with around here …
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There has been a sudden uptick in videos that have snagged that old Saturday morning cartoon Japanese style, with nostalgic and hilarious results. The first is "The Adventures of Kim Jong Un" followed by a new rendering of a title sequence for the BBC/PBS production of Sherlock. Memories!
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From Joe, a disturbing message about your personal information being on the internet. It doesn't do any real harm, except to your psyche if you watch it at night while you're at home alone!
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Lizzie Borden and her 40 whacks continue to fascinate (and will be the subject of an upcoming film), and now, 120-year-old legal papers could shed light on those infamous murders. (Also check out the Stuff You Missed in History Class podcast on it!)
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An MTV promo commercial (which I had not seen before) features balloon art in what I can only imagine was probably a terribly frustrating setup. But the results are magnificent!
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Stay tuned - more links tomorrow! In the meantime send your submissions to FlossyLinks@gmail.com ... and Happy St. Patrick's Day! What are your plans for the weekend?

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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iStock
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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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