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The Weird Week in Review

Email from Beyond the Grave

Jack Froese of Dunmore, Pennsylvania, died suddenly last year at age 32. Six months later, his friends and family began to receive mysterious email messages from Froese's account. Childhood friend Tim Hart got a message warning him to clean his attic, a subject Froese had teased him about before his death. Cousin Jimmy McGraw got an email from Froese referring to an ankle injury McGraw sustained after Froese's death. No one knows who the messages came from, but Froese's mother told the recipients to accept it as a gift, even if it is someone playing a prank.

Exploding Milk Causes Havoc on Highway

A truck transporting milk and cream on the A75 in Galloway, Scotland, caused chaos Tuesday morning when the cargo began to explode. Other drivers saw that the truck was on fire! It took some time for motorists to alert the driver, Phil Sykes, because he couldn't see the fire in his mirrors. Firefighters responded, and had the flames out in abut two hours. They were hampered in their efforts by exploding cream containers and milk cartons. A firefighter said there was milk everywhere.

Mr Sykes said: “I phoned my boss to let him know but he said it was no use crying over spilled milk.The main thing was that no-one was injured.

World Record Guinea Pig Jump

A guinea pig in Rosyth, Fife, Scotland, named Truffles took a leap into the record books in front of Guinness-appointed witnesses, his 13-year-old owner Chloe Macari, and her scout troop. Truffles jumped for neither fame nor fortune, but for his favorite snack, cucumber. The jump was measured at 30 centimeters, which was 10 centimeters more than the previous record set in 2009. When Macari learned of the 2009 record, she knew her guinea pig could jump further, and petitioned Guinness officials for a chance to prove it. Truffles now goes into the record book, and Macari earned credit toward a community events scout badge. The jump was captured on video.

The Battle of the Barber Poles

Growing tensions have a couple of states considering legislation to spell out who can display the iconic spiral-striped barber pole. Licensed barbers say their profession has the exclusive right to the symbol, while beauticians, cosmetologists, and salon owners say that since they cut men's hair, they should be able to use a barber pole, too. The professions that serve men and women have been at odds with each other for centuries. At least ten states have already reserved the pole for barbers only by law, and Minnesota and Michigan have such bills in the legislative process.

Sex-deprived Fruit Flies Turn to Alcohol

Studies in human addictive behavior have found that alcoholism is only partially genetic, so scientists turned to fruit flies to see if social triggers could cause excessive drinking. It turns out that fruit flies are not so different from humans after all. They separated groups of flies and arranged for one group to be rejected as mating partners. That group tended to seek out alcohol-laced fly food more than the group that mated successfully. The drunk flies bumped into walls and each other, fell down, and eventually passed out. The researchers found a correlation in the level of a particular neuropeptide molecule that determined which group would prefer the alcohol-laced food.

Bigamy Exposed via Facebook

You know that feature of Facebook in which it suggests new friends for you among your friend's other friends? In the case of a Seattle man, the social network suggested that his first wife "friend" his second wife. See, he is still married to the first wife.

According to charging documents filed Thursday, Alan L. O'Neill married a woman in 2001, moved out in 2009, changed his name and remarried without divorcing her. The first wife first noticed O'Neill had moved on to another woman when Facebook suggested the friendship connection to wife No. 2 under the "People You May Know" feature.

"Wife No. 1 went to wife No. 2's page and saw a picture of her and her husband with a wedding cake," Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist told The Associated Press.

Wife No. 1 then called the defendant's mother.

She also called authorities, and O'Neill was arrested for bigamy. He was freed until his court appearance, as he is not considered a threat.

BASE Jumpers Skip Out on Bar Bill

Four men in business suits carrying a suitcase enjoyed drinks at the Vue de Monde restaurant atop the Rialto Towers in Melbourne, Australia, Tuesday evening. They visited the restroom and then threw themselves off the balcony! The four parachuted down the 243-meter skyscraper to a waiting car below. The parachutes were hidden under their suit jackets, and the helmets were in the suitcase. Police are on the lookout for the BASE jumpers, not only because jumping from the towers is illegal, but also because they didn't pay their bar tab.

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Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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Food
Cheese Wheel Wedding Cakes Are a Funky Twist on an Old Tradition
Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Nom & Malc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

If there’s ever a time you have permission to be cheesy, it’s on your wedding day. What better way to do so than with a pungent wedding cake made of actual wheels of cheese? According to Elite Daily, cheese wedding cakes are a real option for couples who share an affinity for dairy products.

One of the trailblazers behind the sharp trend is Bath, England-based cheese supplier The Fine Cheese Co. The company offers clients a choice of one of dozens of wedding cake designs. There are bold show-stoppers like the Beatrice cake, which features five tiers of cheese and is priced at $400. For customers looking for something more delicate, there’s the Clara centerpiece, which replaces miniature wedding cakes with mounds of goat cheese. Whether your loved one likes funky Stilton or mellow brie, there’s a cheese cake to satisfy every palate. Flowers are incorporated into each display to make them just as pretty as conventional wedding cakes.

Since The Fine Cheese Co. arranged their first wedding cake in 2002, other cheese suppliers have entered the game. The Cheese Shed in Newton Abbot, England; I.J. Ellis Cheesemongers in Scotland; and Murray’s Cheese in New York will provide cheese wheel towers for weddings or any other special occasion. Of course, there’s nothing stopping you from clearing out the local fromagerie and assembling a cheese cake at home.

[h/t Elite Daily]

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Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo
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History
The Funky History of George Washington's Fake Teeth
Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo
Screenshot via Mount Vernon/Vimeo

George Washington may have the most famous teeth—or lack thereof—in American history. But counter to what you may have heard about the Founding Father's ill-fitting dentures, they weren't made of wood. In fact, he had several sets of dentures throughout his life, none of which were originally trees. And some of them are still around. The historic Mount Vernon estate holds the only complete set of dentures that has survived the centuries, and the museum features a video that walks through old George's dental history.

Likely due to genetics, poor diet, and dental disease, Washington began losing his original teeth when he was still a young man. By the time he became president in 1789, he only had one left in his mouth. The dentures he purchased to replace his teeth were the most scientifically advanced of the time, but in the late 18th century, that didn't mean much.

They didn't fit well, which caused him pain, and made it difficult to eat and talk. The dentures also changed the way Washington looked. They disfigured his face, causing his lips to noticeably stick out. But that doesn't mean Washington wasn't grateful for them. When he finally lost his last surviving tooth, he sent it to his dentist, John Greenwood, who had made him dentures of hippo ivory, gold, and brass that accommodated the remaining tooth while it still lived. (The lower denture of that particular pair is now held at the New York Academy of Medicine.)

A set of historic dentures
George Washington's Mount Vernon

These days, no one would want to wear dentures like the ones currently held at Mount Vernon (above). They're made of materials that would definitely leave a bad taste in your mouth. The base that fit the fake teeth into the jaw was made of lead. The top teeth were sourced from horses or donkeys, and the bottom were from cows and—wait for it—people.

These teeth actually deteriorated themselves, revealing the wire that held them together. The dentures open and shut thanks to metal springs, but because they were controlled by springs, if he wanted to keep his mouth shut, Washington had to permanently clench his jaw. You can get a better idea of how the contraption worked in the video from Mount Vernon below.

Washington's Dentures from Mount Vernon on Vimeo.

There are plenty of lessons we can learn from the life of George Washington, but perhaps the most salient is this: You should definitely, definitely floss.

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