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The Late Movies: "Put This On," A Series About Men Dressing Like Grownups

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I've been a fan of Put This On for years: I first linked to them way back in 2009 after chipping in a few bucks to help fund their first episode. Explained simply, it's a show for men about how to dress like a grownup. Sometimes this is as simple as explaining how to tie your shoes (you're probably doing it wrong), how to wash jeans properly (you're definitely doing it wrong), or even how to fold and pack a suit when you're traveling (points for trying, Mr. Wrinkly!). Beyond these tips, the show interviews men's style icons and explores cultural phenomena related to clothing. Best part? It's all free online. So if you're a guy, and you're wearing a tee-shirt right now (admit it), maybe you'd like to dress up a little? Here's the series to date (all of Season 1, plus the first episode of Season 2, which debuted today):

1. Denim

Including some life-changing tips regarding Woolite Black.

2. Shoes

"It's possible you've been tying your shoes wrong your whole life." Very possible.

3. Work

Who knew Paul Feig was such a snappy dresser?

4. Grooming

Listen up, gents: here's the right way to shave.

5. Tradition

On pocket squares: "When God made jackets, he put a pocket there." The pocket is not there for your phone.

6. Body

Have you ever worn a custom shirt, or do you buy off the rack? As James Ellroy once told me, a custom shirt will last you the rest of your life -- it's worth it.

7. Personal Style

Including an interview with Gay Talese, the rare man with his very own lapel style. Plus, a meeting of the Corduroy Appreciation Club -- attendees must wear at least two corduroy items.

8. The Melting Pot (Season 2, Episode 1)

Featuring a detailed investigation of the 'Lo Heads, enthusiasts of Polo Ralph Lauren menswear.

More

Check out the Put This On site for links to their podcast, blog, and the Put This On Gentlemen's Association -- a subscription pocket square service. Seriously. Not even I am that fancy, and y'all know I roll deep fancy.

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Unboxing Dr. Seuss Toys (and Facts)!
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Dr. Seuss said if he were invited to a dinner party with his characters, "I wouldn't show up."

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Why a Howling Wind Sounds So Spooky, According to Science
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Halloween is swiftly approaching, meaning you'll likely soon hear creepy soundtracks—replete with screams, clanking chains, and howling winds—blaring from haunted houses and home displays. While the sound of human suffering is frightful for obvious reasons, what is it, exactly, about a brisk fall gust that sends shivers up our spines? In horror movie scenes and ghost stories, these spooky gales are always presented as blowing through dead trees. Do bare branches actually make the natural wailing noises louder, or is this detail added simply for atmospheric purposes?

As the SciShow's Hank Green explains in the video below, wind howls because it curves around obstacles like trees or buildings. When fast-moving air goes around, say, a tree, it splits up as it whips past, before coming back together on the other side. Due to factors such as natural randomness, air speed, and the tree's surface, one side's wind is going to be slightly stronger when the two currents rejoin, pushing the other side's gust out of the way. The two continue to interact back-and-forth in what could be likened to an invisible wrestling match, as high-pressure airwaves and whirlpools mix together and vibrate the air. If the wind is fast enough, this phenomenon will produce the eerie noise we've all come to recognize in horror films.

Leafy trees "will absorb some of the vibrations in the air and dull the sound, but without leaves—like if it's the middle of the winter or the entire forest is dead—the howling will travel a lot farther," Green explains. That's why a dead forest on a windy night sounds so much like the undead.

Learn more by watching SciShow's video below.

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