The mental_floss Guide to the NCAA Tournament: The West

We may not be much help in filling out your bracket, but we can promise one interesting fact about each of the 68 teams in the tournament. Let's tip things off with the West Region.

© Chris Bergin/Icon SMI/Corbis

(1) Michigan State
In May, a Michigan State professor from the School of Social Work will begin teaching an online course called “Surviving the Coming Zombie Apocalypse: Catastrophes and Human Behavior."

(16) Long Island
The Arnold and Marie Schwartz Athletic Center on the Long Island University campus has been owned by the university since 1962. But before Arnold and Marie got their hands on it, it was the Paramount Theatre. When it opened in 1928, it was the first theatre designed specifically to show movies with sound.

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(8) Memphis
Memphis has a live tiger mascot. Tom I was introduced at a Memphis State-Cincinnati football game in 1972 and lived at the Memphis Zoo until his death in 1992. Tom III, who was born at the Wisconsin Big Cat Rescue and Educational Center, was introduced in November 2009.

(9) St. Louis
St. Louis University's mascot is the Billiken. What is a Billiken, exactly? According to the "What is a Billiken?" page on the school's website, the school has no idea. But they do know the Billiken is "a good-luck figure who represents things as they ought to be."
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(5) New Mexico
According to the school, it picked the Spanish word for “wolf” as its nickname in 1920. The school paper wrote, “The Lobo is respected for his cunning, feared for his prowess, and is the leader of the pack. It is the ideal name for the Varsity boys who go forth to battle for the glory of the school. All together now; fifteen rahs for the LOBOS.”

(12) Long Beach State
Both Steve Martin and Steven Spielberg dropped out of Long Beach State. The school gave Martin an honorary doctorate in 1989; instead of the traditional mortarboard, he wore an arrow-through-the-head hat. And Spielberg returned 34 years after dropping out to earn his BA. His film professor accepted Schindler's List in place of the short student film normally required to pass the class.
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(4) Louisville
Louisville contains at least one sight that art lovers can’t miss: one of the original monumental size bronze casts of Rodin’s The Thinker. U of L’s version of the sculpture sits outside of Grawemeyer Hall and is actually the very first bronze cast of The Thinker that Rodin made. The cast itself dates back to 1903, but it’s been at its current spot on Louisville’s campus since 1949.

(13) Davidson
The Davidson campus outside of Charlotte was designated a registered national arboretum (a place where trees are on display) in 1982 and boasts more than 3,000 tagged varieties of trees and shrubs across 100 acres. For any Davidson students who enjoy hijinks, the twigs of the campus’s rare gingko tree can really stink up a dorm room if you hide some in your hallmate’s radiator.
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(6) Murray State

Murray State features an odd campus attraction: a tree with dozens of shoes nailed to it. If two students meet at Murray State and later marry, tradition dictates that each nails a shoe to the tree. If the couple has children, they nail a baby shoe to the tree. The shoe tree visitors to campus can view is actually the second shoe tree; the original was lost in a lightning strike. (Downside of filling a tree with nails, we guess.)

(11) Colorado State
The school's most notorious graduate was Anwar al-Awlaki, who earned a BS in civil engineering in 1994. A top recruiter and coordinator for al-Qaeda, al-Awlaki was killed by a predator drone strike in 2011.
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(3) Marquette
Chris Farley went to Marquette and donned his Marquette Rugby jacket during a scene in Tommy Boy. (Tommy also went to Marquette, though it took him seven years to graduate.)

(14) Brigham Young
Provo, Utah, is home to both BYU and Ancestry.com, which boasts more than 1.7 million paying subscribers. The company began as a print publisher of Ancestry magazine and genealogy books.

(14) Iona
Iona counts Don McLean among its famous alumni. McLean, who grew up in New Rochelle, NY, attended night school and earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from his neighborhood school in 1968.
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(7) Florida
Constructed in 1953, the school's 157-foot Century Tower houses a 57,760-pound carillon that is played using 61 keys and 25 pedals. Students can take a carillon class in which they ultimately have to play the Century Tower carillon for their grade.

(10) Virginia

While the Cavalier is the official mascot of the University of Virginia, their unofficial mascot is the wahoo—a saltwater game fish whose claim to fame is that it can drink twice its own body weight, temporarily increasing its size to fend off enemies. This would be quite a handy skill in the tournament. [Image credit: Jaryd Waegerle, Wahoo Wire]
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(2) Missouri
Missouri’s mascot is named Truman the Tiger after Harry Truman, the only U.S. president from Missouri.

(15) Norfolk State
Norfolk State, located in southeastern Virginia, is one of the largest historically black colleges in the country. Paul Hines, a coach on the T.C. Williams football team featured in Remember the Titans, attended Norfolk State for two years before finishing at Virginia State College.

Your esteemed fact-finding crew: Jamie Spatola, Stacy Conradt, Ethan Trex, Colin Perkins, Scott Allen and Meg McGinn. They'll be back with another region later tonight.

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Shout! Factory
10 Surprising Facts About Mr. Mom
Shout! Factory
Shout! Factory

John Hughes penned the script for 1983's Mr. Mom, a comedy about a family man named Jack Butler (Micheal Keaton) who loses his job. To ensure their three kids are taken care of, his wife, Caroline (Teri Garr), goes back to work—leaving Jack to fight off a vacuum cleaner and learn why it's never a good idea to feed chili to a baby.

In 1982, Keaton turned in a star-making role in Ron Howard’s Night Shift, but Mr. Mom marked the first time he headlined a movie, and it launched his career. Hughes had written National Lampoon's Vacation, which—oddly enough—was released in theaters the weekend after Mr. Mom. But Hughes himself was still a relative unknown, as it would be another year before he entered the teen flick phase of his career, which would make him iconic.

In the meantime, Mr. Mom hit home for a lot of viewers, as the economy was on the downturn and more and more women were entering (or reentering) the workforce. But some people think that the movie's ending—which sees the couple revert to traditional gender roles—sidelined the movie's message. Still, on the 35th anniversary of its release, Mr. Mom remains an ahead-of-its-time comedy classic.

1. IT'S BASED ON A TRUE STORY.

Mr. Mom producer Lauren Shuler Donner came across a funny article John Hughes had written for National Lampoon. Based on that, she contacted him and the two became friends. “One day, he was telling me that his wife had gone down to Arizona and he was in charge of the two boys and he didn’t know what he was doing,” Donner told IGN. “It was hilarious! I was on the floor laughing. He said, ‘Do you think this would make a good movie?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, this is really funny.’ So he said, ‘Well, I have about 80 pages in a drawer. Would you look at it?’ So I looked at it and I said, ‘This is great! Let’s do it!’ We kind of developed it ourselves.” In the book Movie Moguls Speak, Donner mentioned how Hughes “had never been to a grocery store, he had never operated a vacuum cleaner. John was so ignorant, that in his ignorance, he was hilarious.”

The players involved with the movie told Donner and Hughes they thought it should be a TV movie. Hughes had a TV deal with Aaron Spelling, who came aboard to executive produce. “Then the players involved were upset because John was writing out of Chicago instead of L.A.,” Donner said in Movie Moguls Speak. “They fired John and brought in a group of TV writers. In the end, John and I were muscled out. It was a good movie, but if you ever read John’s original script for Mr. Mom, it’s far better.”

2. JOHN HUGHES REJECTED THE IDEA OF DIRECTING MR. MOM.

Stan Dragoti ended up directing the film, but only after Hughes turned it down, because he preferred to make his movies in Chicago, not Hollywood. “I don’t like being around the people in the movie business,” Hughes told Roger Ebert. “In Hollywood, you spend all of your time having lunch and making deals. Everybody is trying to shoot you down. I like to get my actors out here where we can make our movies in privacy.” Hughes remained in Chicago and filmed his directorial debut, Sixteen Candles, there.

3. MICHAEL KEATON GOT THE ROLE BECAUSE OF NIGHT SHIFT.

In 1982’s Night Shift, Keaton’s character works at a morgue and starts a prostitution ring with co-worker Henry Winkler. Donner had an agent friend, Laurie Perlman, who represented the not-yet-famous actor. She contacted Donner and pitched Keaton to her. “’Look, I represent this guy who is really funny. Would you meet with him?’" Donner recalled of the conversation. "So I met with him. Usually I don’t like to do this unless we’re casting, but I met with him because she was my friend. And then she said, ‘You have to see this movie Night Shift that he’s in.’ So I went to see Night Shift, and midway through I couldn’t wait to get out of that theater to give Mr. Mom to Michael Keaton. Fortunately, he liked it."

Keaton told Grantland that he turned down one of the main roles in Splash to play Jack Butler. “I just remember at the time thinking I wanted to get away from what I’d just done on Night Shift,” he said. “I thought if I do it again, I might get myself stuck. So then Mr. Mom came along. So I said no [to Splash] so I could set up this framework right away where I could do different things.”

4. THE FILM BROKE NEW GROUND.

Teri Garr, Michael Keaton, Taliesin Jaffe, Frederick Koehler, and Martin Mull in Mr. Mom (1983)
Shout! Factory

In 1983, more women stayed at home than worked, so it was a novelty for a man to be a stay-at-home dad. Today, an estimated 1.4 million men are stay-at-home dads, and 7 million men are their children's primary caregiver. “Mr. Mom became part of the vernacular,” Donner told Newsweek. “Mr. Mom represented a segment of men who were at home dealing with the kids who, up until then, really hadn’t been heard from. That’s what really told me about the power of film, because it spoke for a lot of men. It also helped women, because I think that women sometimes, if you’re a housewife, you’re not really appreciated for what you do. This sort of made women feel better about what they did because they knew that men were understanding it.”

5. TODAY, “MR. MOM” IS CONSIDERED A PEJORATIVE TERM.

More than 30 years after the film’s release, stay-at-home dads feel the term “Mr. Mom” should die. The National At-Home Dad Network launched a campaign to terminate the phrase and instead have people refer to men as “Dad.” In 2014 Lake Superior State University voted to banish “Mr. Mom” from the lexicon.

“At least, the pop-culture image of the inept dad who wouldn’t know a diaper genie from a garbage disposal has begun to fade,” wrote The Wall Street Journal, after declaring “Mr. Mom is dead.”

6. TERI GARR DIDN’T KNOW IT WAS A MESSAGE MOVIE.

The movie redefined gender roles, but when the producers pitched the premise to Garr, they hid the plot reversal. “They just told me it was about a guy who does the work that a woman does, because it’s so easy,” she told The A.V. Club. “And I went, ‘Oh, yeah. Ha ha.’ It’s so easy. All the women I know who stay home and take care of their kids, they go, ‘Oh yeah, this is easy.’ Hmm.”

7. MARTIN MULL IMPROVISED THE “220, 221” LINE.

The quote everyone remembers from the movie comes from Jack, holding a chainsaw, standing next to Ron Richardson (Martin Mull) and discussing what kind of wiring Jack will use in renovating the house: “220, 221, whatever it takes,” Jack says.

“We’re doing the scene and it was okay,” Keaton told Esquire. “And I remember saying to the prop guy, ‘Go find me a chainsaw.’ When he comes back with it, he says, ‘You wanna wear these?’ And he holds up some goggles. I go, ‘Yeah.’ You know, they make me look crazy. And when Martin shows up, I know I should look under control, I’m not sweating it. I’m a dude. So we’re standing there, Martin pulls me aside and says, ‘You know what you ought to say? When I ask about the wiring, you oughta just deadpan: ‘220, 221.’ I died. It was perfect. I may have added ‘whatever it takes.’ But it was his.”

“That was a little ad-lib that we just threw in, but every carpenter or construction person I’ve ever worked with, they’re always quoting that line from Mr. Mom,” Mull told The A.V. Club.

8. MR. MOM OUTGROSSED HUGHES’S OTHER 1983 SUMMER MOVIE—VACATION.

Mr. Mom only opened on 126 screens on July 22, 1983, but managed to gross $947,197 during its opening weekend. Once the film went wide a month later to 1235 screens, it hit number one at the box office and spent five weeks at the top. By the end of its run, the film had grossed just shy of $65 million, making it the ninth highest-grossing film of 1983 (just between Staying Alive and Risky Business). National Lampoon’s Vacation, Hughes’s other film that summer, came out July 29 and ended its theatrical run with $61,399,552 (at its height, it showed on 1248 screens). Vacation finished the year in 11th place.

9. THE MOVIE LED TO HUGHES BEING CALLED “A PURVEYOR OF HORNY SEX COMEDIES.”

During a 1986 interview with Seventeen magazine, Molly Ringwald asked the writer-director why he never showed teen sex in Sixteen Candles or The Breakfast Club. “In Sixteen Candles, I figured it would only be gratuitous to show Samantha and Jake in anything more than a kiss,” he said. “The kiss is the most beautiful moment. I was really amused when someone once called me a ‘purveyor of horny sex comedies.’ He listed The Breakfast Club and Mr. Mom in parentheses. I thought, ‘What kind of sex?’ Yes, in Mr. Mom there’s a baby in a bathtub and you see its bare butt.”

10. MR. MOM WAS MADE INTO A TV MOVIE AFTER ALL.

In the beginning, producers wanted Mr. Mom to be a TV movie, not a feature film. But a year after the film came out in theaters, ABC produced a TV movie called Mr. Mom, with the same characters and premise. Barry Van Dyke played Jack and Rebecca York played Caroline. A People magazine review of the movie stated: “They and their three kids are immediately likable … But it goes downhill from there as the script lobotomizes all its characters. Here’s a textbook case in how TV takes a cute idea—and a script that does have some good lines—and leeches the wit out of it.”

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Prepositions in Band Names
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