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The Other Doctors of Doctor Who

There are eleven Doctors on Doctor Who, right? Well, yes, but not exactly. Those are the "canonical eleven" — the official Doctors. But are you familiar with some of the others?

1. The Dalek Movie Doctor

In the mid-60s, Dalek Fever was sweeping England. Dalek creator Terry Nation secured the rights to produce two Doctor Who movies. The Daleks and Dalek Invasion Earth: 2150 AD starred legendary British actor Peter Cushing (famous for Hammer films and Sherlock Holmes, and later famous as Grand Moff Tarkin in the original Star Wars film). His Doctor was more affable than William Hartnell's, and was different in another crucial respect—he was human. In 2005, the revived series played homage to the movies by borrowing elements of the TARDIS console room set, including the police box doors visible on the interior.

The trailer for Dalek Invasion Earth: 2150 AD

2. The Other First Doctor

When the series turned 20 in 1983, it was decided to do a spectacular feature-length episode featuring all five Doctors. However, two were unavailable: Tom Baker had other commitments and William Hartnell had died several years before. Hartnell's role was crucial, and the decision was made, for the only time in the series' history, to recast a Doctor. They selected Richard Hurndall, who leaned towards Hartnell's later, softer seasons. Hartnell made a cameo, in the form of retransmitted footage from "The Dalek Invasion of Earth" as a cold open, the only cold open in the original series' history.

First part of The Five Doctors, special edition edit. Hurndall appears around 4:25.

3. The Eight Morbius Doctors

Time Lords have thirteen lives, right? Well, until 1976, that wasn't established, and it was presumed they could regenerate indefinitely. In "The Brain of Morbius," the Fourth Doctor battles a heinous Gallifreyan criminal named Morbius, who is now reduced to a brain forced to live in a hideous, cobbled-together body. During a mental duel, the Doctor's past lives appear: Jon Pertwee, Patrick Troughton, William Hartnell... and then members of the production crew: George Gallacio, Robert Holmes, Graeme Harper, Douglas Camfield, Philip Hinchcliffe, Christopher Baker, Robert Banks Stewart, and Christopher Barry. After the 13-life limit was established, these eight became non-canon.

This clip is from the end of the story, so view with caution. The past Doctors show up around 14:00.

4. The Other Fourth Doctor: The Stage Doctor

In 1974, Doctor Who arrived on the stage in a production called Doctor Who and the Daleks in the Seven Keys to Doomsday, in a plot very loosely based on a TV serial, "The Keys of Marinus." Actor Trevor Martin was cast in the role, as an alternate version of the Fourth Doctor. He reprised the role a few years ago for an audio drama version of the story that is presently available on CD from Big Finish Productions.


These posters are for the stage and audio play versions of the story.

5. The Comic Relief: Red Nose Day Doctors

"Doctor Who and the Curse of Fatal Death" was a charity production for the Red Nose Day 1999 telethon. The story followed the Ninth Doctor as he announced his retirement and intention to get married, much to the disgust of the Master (played delightfully over-the-top by Jonathon Pryce), who teams up with the Daleks to destroy their mutual foe. Hijinks ensue, and the Ninth Doctor, played by Rowan Atkinson, ends up burning through all of his remaining regenerations as Richard E. Grant, Jim Broadbent, Hugh Grant, and, lastly, Joanna Lumley.

The full-length, official YouTube release by Red Nose Day

6. The Shalka Doctor

To celebrate the 40th anniversary in 2003, the BBC decided to try something new: an animated, webcast series, fully intended to be canonical. The Ninth Doctor was cast as Richard E. Grant, and "The Scream of Shalka" was produced and broadcast. It was reasonably successful, but it was quickly overtaken by Russell T. Davies' effort to revive the series live-action and became non-canon.

Part one of "The Scream of Shalka"

7. The Valeyard

Season 23, "The Trial of a Time Lord." The Sixth Doctor is on trial, and his prosecutor is a mysterious and sinister fellow called the Valeyard. But the Doctor realizes that the evidence has been tampered with, and it is eventually revealed that the Valeyard is in fact a possible future incarnation of the Doctor, and he has been promised all of the Doctor's remaining lives if he can get a conviction. Played with malevolent grace by Michael Jayston, the Valeyard escapes at the end of the serial, never to be seen again.

The Doctor arrives on Gallifrey and meets the Valeyard, the Inquisitor, and his jury of Time Lord peers.

8. The Dream Lord

In "Amy's Choice," the Doctor, Amy, and Rory find themselves in a strange dilemma — a sadistic fellow called the Dream Lord, played by Toby Jones, appears in the TARDIS and explains they have to decide which of two scenarios are real, before they get killed in one of them. He turns out to be a manifestation of the Doctor's own unconscious, triggered by psychic pollen caught in the Time Rotor. Fans have since speculated that this is the part of the Doctor that could eventually become the Valeyard.

The Dream Lord appears and explains their predicament.

9. The Watcher

There's another not-quite Doctor on the series, and he appeared in "Logopolis," the dramatic conclusion to Tom Baker's tenure as the Fourth Doctor. In the distance, a curiously luminous figure is seen, watching silently and then disappearing, occasionally helping, but never speaking. Played by Adrian Gibbs, "The Watcher" is a transitional Doctor, sort of an advance version of Number Five who appears to assist in a time of great danger.

Fan-produced set of Watcher clips (not exhaustive) from "Logopolis"

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11 Fast Facts About Cash Cab
Discovery Channel
Discovery Channel

Between 2005 and 2012, anyone hailing a taxi in New York harbored a secret wish: that they’d wind up in the Cash Cab. The mysterious vehicle was both a licensed city taxi and a mobile game show, one where passengers could win thousands of dollars just by answering a few trivia questions on the way to their destination. After five years away, it’s back on Discovery Channel with its original cabbie host, Ben Bailey. But before you slide into the Cash Cab seat once again, check out some trivia on the series itself. Who knows—it could come in handy during your next taxi ride.

1. THE SERIES ORIGINATED IN ENGLAND.

Before Cash Cab came to the U.S., it had a brief run in Britain. This Cash Cab aired on ITV with host John Moody. It kicked off in the summer of 2005 and, although producers had high hopes for the series, fizzled out by the following year.

2. THERE ARE CASH CABS ALL OVER THE WORLD NOW.

Since the American iteration of Cash Cab became a hit, the concept has expanded across the globe. Internationally, it’s earned airtime in India, Canada, Jamaica, Egypt, and many more countries. Just stateside, the show has had additional runs outside of New York. Check out a clip from Cash Cab Chicago, with host Beth Melewski, above.

3. BEN BAILEY HAD TO PASS A DRIVING TEST.

Before Ben Bailey was the host of Cash Cab, he was a stand-up comedian who drove limos to pay the bills. That side gig turned out to be useful when he auditioned for the show. According to NJ.com, Bailey demonstrated his skills behind the wheel by scoring a 92 on his taxi license exam. He got the Cash Cab job, and left his old chauffeuring job behind. But he still does stand-up comedy (in fact, he’s touring now).

4. BAILEY HAS SECRET HELPERS.

Cash Cab can’t run on one man or one vehicle alone; Bailey has a crew close by at all times. Esquire reported that a black van housing the audio and video team trails behind the car. Bailey also has assistants who hop into the cab after he has revealed his identity to passengers. They’ll get contestants to sign their release forms, then work the lights and music. These assistants also, crucially, keep track of how much money is on the line.

5. SOME CONTESTANTS ARE SELECTED AHEAD OF TIME.

Not all passengers are chosen randomly off the street. Some are prescreened, although even that process is a little sneaky. According to previous contestants, the Cash Cab staff often approaches people by saying they work for a made-up series called Show Me New York, where residents share their favorite spots in the city. They’ll give prospective contestants a quiz. If they do well, the staffers will tell them to go to a certain location to film their segment. That’s when they get in the cab, and Bailey reveals the ruse.

6. NOT EVERYONE WANTS TO PLAY.

Ben Bailey and the Cash Cab
Discovery Channel

While most people shriek in delight when the lights go off in the Cash Cab, not everyone is into the game. Bailey told NPR that when the show was first starting out, people regularly declined to participate. “People would kind of look at me and go, 'I don’t know what this crazy cab driver is up to, but I am out of here,'" he said. After the show gained attention, more passengers stuck around. But Bailey still got some hold-outs.

“I’ve had a couple people who burst into tears in the cab when I’ve told them what was going on,” he told Thrillist. “One time someone seemed to have some sort of panic attack, and then another time, this one woman was having an awful day—she just wanted to get in the cab and get where she needed to go. I was like, ‘Why are you crying in the Cash Cab? This is supposed to be fun, man!’”

7. THE CASH CAB IS FREE.

Regardless of how well they do, contestants never pay a fare for riding in the Cash Cab. Bailey still runs the meter, because the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission requires drivers to keep a record of the trip, but there’s no fee at the end of the trip. As Bailey puts it: The Cash Cab is one of only two free rides in New York. The other is the Staten Island Ferry.

8. THE BIGGEST PAYOUT WAS $6200.

To date, the biggest winner in Cash Cab history is a man named Sam, who took a ride with Bailey in 2011. He correctly answered a Video Bonus question about the Bonneville Salt Flats, doubling his $3100 in prize money to $6200. Anyone looking to beat Sam this season had better study up on America’s salt pans.

9. THE ORIGINAL CASH CAB WAS A TOYOTA SIENNA.

During the show’s original run, the Cash Cab was a Toyota Sienna minivan, sporting the taxi number 1G12. According to the Associated Press, the specs were so well-known that fans would chant the taxi number at Bailey’s standup shows in New York.

10. THE OLD CASH CAB IS CURRENTLY IN BAILEY’S GARAGE.

When the old Cash Cab minivan retired, it wound up in Bailey’s own garage in Morristown, New Jersey. “My neighbors are like, ‘Are you a cab driver?’” he told Entertainment Weekly. Bailey admits that he sometimes takes the car out for a drive, to “get people excited just to disappoint them.”

11. NO ONE HAS EVER THROWN UP IN THE CASH CAB.

Bailey gets this question all the time and would like to set the record straight: Nobody has ever puked in the Cash Cab. “Surprisingly, no one has,” he told the New York Post. “Once in a while you get someone who is a little disgruntled when they lose, but no release of bodily [fluids] happens on my watch.”

Hopefully, that streak will continue with the show's return.

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40 Years Later: Watch The Johnny Cash Christmas Show
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Over the course of his career, Johnny Cash made a series of Christmas TV specials and recorded a string of Christmas records. In this 1977 TV performance, Cash is in great form. He brings special guests Roy Clark, June Carter Cash, The Carter Family, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison ("Pretty Woman" starts around 23:50), Carl Perkins, and the Statler Brothers. Tune in for Christmas as we celebrated it 40 years ago—with gigantic shirt collars, wavy hair, and bow ties. So many bow ties.

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