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11 Geeky Craft Creations, Including Rainbow Brite vs. Strawberry Shortcake

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There's a lot of variety in geek crafting. Whether you geek out over Star Wars, Pokemon or marine biology, there are plenty of subjects for you to enjoy, whether you prefer them rendered via crocheting, sewing or felting.

Cross Stitch

If you spent your childhood playing Nintendo, then you'll recognize the screen this cross stitch has captured so perfectly. In fact, it’s easy to expect the cacti to start dancing like they do in the game. Cross Stitch Ninja of Radical Cross Stitch definitely nailed the game's look and feel.

For those with a soft spot for both 80s cartoons and the era’s violent fighting games, this delightful cross stitch featuring Rainbow Brite battling Strawberry Shortcake should be just up your alley. Of course, if you prefer watching Care Bears fight to the death, then you’ll be happy to know that Jude Buffum also stitched one of those for your viewing pleasure.

If you’re more into modern geekery, then perhaps you’ll prefer this great meme cross stitch featuring Keyboard Cat. While it was originally created by Julie of Subversive Cross Stitch, it has since been removed, although you can still view it over at BoingBoing.

Sewing

For something a little more practical, this Keyboard Cat quilt by Cheryl Sleboda of Muppin.com could keep you warm as well as entertained. Of course, if you prefer your meme kitties in Nyan form, then she’s got you covered there as well.

History buffs, your interests aren’t exempted from this geek craft roundup. Whether you actually prefer the true story or the television drama version, these Tudor dolls by DeriDolls are a great way to reenact your favorite scenes from the lives of Henry, Catherine, Anne and the rest of the king’s wives.

Crochet

This Salacious Crumb plush might just be one of the cutest geeky crafts ever made. In fact, it’s amazing how much a little crochet work can create something far more adorable than the original puppet used in Star Wars. To see more work by artist Allison Hoffman, don’t forget to click on the link to visit her blog where you can see other great creations, including her take on the Flaming C (Conan O’Brien’s superhero character).

Ms. Hoffman has quite a talent for making great geek crochet creations and has not only worked on Star Wars and Conan characters, but also on creatures seen on Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, including Chairry, Pee Wee, Jambi and this Magic Screen that operates as a whimsical and adorable picture frame.

If you’ve never played any of the Katamari games, then not only are you missing out on one of the most delightfully strange video games, you’re also keeping yourself from being able to appreciate why things like this magnetic crocheted katamari by Amy Shimel are so wonderful. For those of you who do understand the power of the rolling katamari and who know how to crochet, you can get a pattern to make your own over on Amy’s Babies.

The great thing about crochet is just how versatile the craft is. You can use it to make anything from plushies to picture frames to blankets, like this delightful afghan throw in the shape of a Bulbasaur from Pokemon. Its creator, Craftster forum user SoreLoser, spent a whole year making this blanket that features over 848 small crochet squares.

Felting

For marine animal lovers, particularly those who enjoy the intelligence and sensitivity of cephalopods, there is always this fun, felted octopurse which is just as fashionable as it is a good conversation starter. You can buy your own from Etsy seller Galaflic.

Knitting

If you’re looking for a great geek craft that you could ask your grandma to make you for Christmas though, perhaps you should send her a picture of this Contra sweater now so she has plenty of time to knit it. The design, shared by Reddit user don_majik_juan, is delightful in that it perfectly blends the classic cheesy Christmas sweater with the imagery of the classic side scroller.

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Art
Artist Makes Colorful Prints From 1990s VHS Tapes

A collection of old VHS tapes offers endless crafting possibilities. You can use them to make bird houses, shelving units, or, if you’re London-based artist Dieter Ashton, screen prints from the physical tape itself.

As Co.Design reports, the recent London College of Communication graduate was originally intrigued by the art on the cover of old VHS and cassette tapes. He planned to digitally edit them as part of a new art project, but later realized that working with the ribbons of tape inside was much more interesting.

To make a print, Ashton unravels the film from cassettes and VHS tapes collected from his parents' home. He lets the strips fall randomly then presses them into tight, tangled arrangements with the screen. The piece is then brought to life with vibrant patterns and colors.

Ashton has started playing with ways to incorporate themes and motifs from the films he's repurposing into his artwork. If the movie behind one of his creations isn’t immediately obvious, you can always refer to its title. His pieces are named after movies like Backdraft, Under Siege, and that direct-to-video Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen classic Passport to Paris.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

[h/t Co.Design]

All images courtesy of Dieter Ashton

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photography
This Is What Flowers Look Like When Photographed With an X-Ray Machine
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Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Peruvian Daffodil” (1938)

Many plant photographers choose to showcase the vibrant colors and physical details of exotic flora. For his work with flowers, Dr. Dain L. Tasker took a more bare-bones approach. The radiologist’s ghostly floral images were recorded using only an X-ray machine, according to Hyperallergic.

Tasker snapped his pictures of botanical life while he was working at Los Angeles’s Wilshire Hospital in the 1930s. He had minimal experience photographing landscapes and portraits in his spare time, but it wasn’t until he saw an X-ray of an amaryllis, taken by a colleague, that he felt inspired to swap his camera for the medical tool. He took black-and-white radiographs of everything from roses and daffodils to eucalypti and holly berries. The otherworldly artwork was featured in magazines and art shows during Tasker’s lifetime.

Selections from Tasker's body of work have been seen around the world, including as part of the Floral Studies exhibition at the Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego in 2016. Prints of his work are also available for purchase from the Stinehour Wemyss Editions and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)

X-ray image of a rose.
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “A Rose” (1936)

All images courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery.

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