CLOSE

11 Geeky Craft Creations, Including Rainbow Brite vs. Strawberry Shortcake

There's a lot of variety in geek crafting. Whether you geek out over Star Wars, Pokemon or marine biology, there are plenty of subjects for you to enjoy, whether you prefer them rendered via crocheting, sewing or felting.

Cross Stitch

If you spent your childhood playing Nintendo, then you'll recognize the screen this cross stitch has captured so perfectly. In fact, it’s easy to expect the cacti to start dancing like they do in the game. Cross Stitch Ninja of Radical Cross Stitch definitely nailed the game's look and feel.

For those with a soft spot for both 80s cartoons and the era’s violent fighting games, this delightful cross stitch featuring Rainbow Brite battling Strawberry Shortcake should be just up your alley. Of course, if you prefer watching Care Bears fight to the death, then you’ll be happy to know that Jude Buffum also stitched one of those for your viewing pleasure.

If you’re more into modern geekery, then perhaps you’ll prefer this great meme cross stitch featuring Keyboard Cat. While it was originally created by Julie of Subversive Cross Stitch, it has since been removed, although you can still view it over at BoingBoing.

Sewing

For something a little more practical, this Keyboard Cat quilt by Cheryl Sleboda of Muppin.com could keep you warm as well as entertained. Of course, if you prefer your meme kitties in Nyan form, then she’s got you covered there as well.

History buffs, your interests aren’t exempted from this geek craft roundup. Whether you actually prefer the true story or the television drama version, these Tudor dolls by DeriDolls are a great way to reenact your favorite scenes from the lives of Henry, Catherine, Anne and the rest of the king’s wives.

Crochet

This Salacious Crumb plush might just be one of the cutest geeky crafts ever made. In fact, it’s amazing how much a little crochet work can create something far more adorable than the original puppet used in Star Wars. To see more work by artist Allison Hoffman, don’t forget to click on the link to visit her blog where you can see other great creations, including her take on the Flaming C (Conan O’Brien’s superhero character).

Ms. Hoffman has quite a talent for making great geek crochet creations and has not only worked on Star Wars and Conan characters, but also on creatures seen on Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, including Chairry, Pee Wee, Jambi and this Magic Screen that operates as a whimsical and adorable picture frame.

If you’ve never played any of the Katamari games, then not only are you missing out on one of the most delightfully strange video games, you’re also keeping yourself from being able to appreciate why things like this magnetic crocheted katamari by Amy Shimel are so wonderful. For those of you who do understand the power of the rolling katamari and who know how to crochet, you can get a pattern to make your own over on Amy’s Babies.

The great thing about crochet is just how versatile the craft is. You can use it to make anything from plushies to picture frames to blankets, like this delightful afghan throw in the shape of a Bulbasaur from Pokemon. Its creator, Craftster forum user SoreLoser, spent a whole year making this blanket that features over 848 small crochet squares.

Felting

For marine animal lovers, particularly those who enjoy the intelligence and sensitivity of cephalopods, there is always this fun, felted octopurse which is just as fashionable as it is a good conversation starter. You can buy your own from Etsy seller Galaflic.

Knitting

If you’re looking for a great geek craft that you could ask your grandma to make you for Christmas though, perhaps you should send her a picture of this Contra sweater now so she has plenty of time to knit it. The design, shared by Reddit user don_majik_juan, is delightful in that it perfectly blends the classic cheesy Christmas sweater with the imagery of the classic side scroller.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Art
The Getty Center, Surrounded By Wildfires, Will Leave Its Art Where It Is
iStock
iStock

The wildfires sweeping through California have left countless homeowners and businesses scrambling as the blazes continue to grow out of control in various locations throughout the state. While art lovers worried when they heard that Los Angeles's Getty Center would be closing its doors this week, as the fires closed part of the 405 Freeway, there was a bit of good news. According to museum officials, the priceless works housed inside the famed Getty Center are said to be perfectly secure and won't need to be evacuated from the facility.

“The safest place for the art is right here at the Getty,” Ron Hartwig, the Getty’s vice president of communications, told the Los Angeles Times. According to its website, the museum was closed on December 5 and December 6 “to protect the collections from smoke from fires in the region,” but as of now, the art inside is staying put.

Though every museum has its own way of protecting the priceless works inside it, the Los Angeles Times notes that the Getty Center was constructed in such a way as to protect its contents from the very kind of emergency it's currently facing. The air throughout the gallery is filtered by a system that forces it out, rather than a filtration method which would bring air in. This system will keep the smoke and air pollutants from getting into the facility, and by closing the museum this week, the Getty is preventing the harmful air from entering the building through any open doors.

There is also a water tank at the facility that holds 1 million gallons in reserve for just such an occasion, and any brush on the property is routinely cleared away to prevent the likelihood of a fire spreading. The Getty Villa, a separate campus located in the Pacific Palisades off the Pacific Coast Highway, was also closed out of concern for air quality this week.

The museum is currently working with the police and fire departments in the area to determine the need for future closures and the evacuation of any personnel. So far, the fires have claimed more than 83,000 acres of land, leading to the evacuation of thousands of people and the temporary closure of I-405, which runs right alongside the Getty near Los Angeles’s Bel-Air neighborhood.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Art
This 77-Year-Old Artist Saves Money on Art Supplies by 'Painting' in Microsoft Excel
iStock
iStock

It takes a lot of creativity to turn a blank canvas into an inspired work of art. Japanese artist Tatsuo Horiuchi makes his pictures out of something that’s even more dull than a white page: an empty spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel.

When he retired, the 77-year-old Horiuchi, whose work was recently spotlighted by Great Big Story, decided he wanted to get into art. At the time, he was hesitant to spend money on painting supplies or even computer software, though, so he began experimenting with one of the programs that was already at his disposal.

Horiuchi's unique “painting” method shows that in the right hands, Excel’s graph-building features can be used to bring colorful landscapes to life. The tranquil ponds, dense forests, and blossoming flowers in his art are made by drawing shapes with the software's line tool, then adding shading with the bucket tool.

Since picking up the hobby in the 2000s, Horiuchi has been awarded multiple prizes for his creative work with Excel. Let that be inspiration for Microsoft loyalists who are still broken up about the death of Paint.

You can get a behind-the-scenes look at the artist's process in the video below.

[h/t Great Big Story]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios