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RIP Ralph McQuarrie, Star Wars Visionary

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Geekdom lost an important figure over the weekend – Ralph McQuarrie died at the age of 82. Many people won't know the name, but they will undoubtedly know his work as a concept artist on everything from Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Cocoon to the original Battlestar Galactica. But what he will always be remembered for is his work on the original Star Wars trilogy. In fact, were it not for McQuarrie, Star Wars might never have existed at all.

George Lucas commissioned McQuarrie to create concept art based on scenes from an early draft of the Star Wars script, and Lucas used these visuals to help sell the film to 20th Century Fox. After the movie got the green light, McQuarrie stayed on to help develop the look of everything from iconic characters to vehicles to buildings and landscapes, and even worked on marketing materials, like posters and promotional artwork.

As a tribute to McQuarrie and his impressive body of work, we present a gallery of some of his concept and production art for Star Wars. I think you'll agree that his vision helped define a generation and quite possibly changed cinema forever.

Concept art for the scene when Darth Vader reveals to Luke that he's...well, you know.

Early concept art of Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker.

Early versions of R2-D2 and C3PO that helped convince 20th Century Fox to make Star Wars.

Early Snowspeeders take down an AT-AT while Snowtroopers run past.

Concept art of an AT-AT preparing to step on Luke Skywalker and his Snowspeeder.

The Ewoks carry their golden deity through the forest of Endor.

Production art for the cloud city of Bespin.

Stormtroopers carrying lightsabers and shields as they intercept our heroes on the Death Star.

An early concept for the Jawa Sandcrawler, as well as a Jawa settlement.

Production art of a squadron of B-Wings taking out a Star Destroyer.

Luke evading the Empire on his Speederbike on the forest moon of Endor.

A Tusken Raider gathering in the cold night of Tatooine.

Production art for Sy Snootles and the Max Rebo Band.

All images copyright Lucasfilm

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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