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The Scully Box

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Gillian Anderson is much shorter than David Duchovny -- estimates of their actual heights vary, but there's roughly a 10" height difference there. So when the pair costarred on The X-Files, filming conversations posed a problem; getting both of their heads in a standing shot would have had Anderson talking into Duchovny's chest (perhaps not the worst fate in the world, but not great TV). The solution is delightful: the Scully Box, which is a variant of the typical apple box. Anderson stood on a specially-designed box that elevated her just enough to have a TV-normal conversation with Duchovny. Have a look:

Prior to the Scully Box, the norm for this sort of task was an apple box, a wooden box of predictable dimensions: 8"x20"x12". (There are also half-apple and quarter-apple sizes, for less demanding applications.) According to TV Tropes, the Scully Box is sized at "an 'apple' and a half," and could be stacked or laid out in a path (you don't want to stack typical apple boxes or have actors walk far on them, as they're not particularly stable). To my eye, the "half" apple is just extra length, not height or width -- but I'm not a TV professional. Also according to TV Tropes, the Scully Box was made of aluminum covered in carpeting, which is a far cry from the typical plain wood of an apple box.

Some reports say that Gillian Anderson called it the "Gilly Board," which is kind of adorable. Here's a snippet of an interview with US Magazine reprinted on Anderson's "official" website, in which the Scully Box or Gilly Board is discussed, but not named. Note how Anderson seems to contradict herself (emphasis added):

US: You walk very tall. Do you ever forget that you're only 5 feet two?

GILLIAN: It depends on how I feel about myself in a given moment. Sometimes I forget I'm short. Sometimes I totally feel how short I am.

US: Like when you have to stand on a box to do a scene with David Duchovny?

GILLIAN: I don't have to stand on a box. Sometimes when we're in a situation walking side by side, like up to a door to pull out our badges and say we're from the FBI, I have to step up onto something so that we're on the same level. I mean, I don't walk on boxes or have boxes attached to my feet. It's funny: Sometimes I forget I'm on the box. Like, I'll have this very serious moment in a very serious scene and I'll turn to the camera and fall right off the box.

(Via The Beautiful Chaotic.)

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Shout! Factory
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entertainment
The Mystery Science Theater 3000 Turkey Day Marathon Is Back
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Shout! Factory

For many fans, Mystery Science Theater 3000 is as beloved a Thanksgiving tradition as mashed potatoes and gravy (except funnier). It seems appropriate, given that the show celebrates the turkeys of the movie world. And that it made its debut on Thanksgiving Day in 1988 (on KTMA, a local station in Minneapolis). In 1991, to celebrate its third anniversary, Comedy Central hosted a Thanksgiving Day marathon of the series—and in the more than 25 years since, that tradition has continued.

Beginning at 12 p.m. ET on Thursday, Shout! Factory will host yet another Mystery Science Theater 3000 Turkey Day marathon, hosted by series creator Joel Hodgson and stars Jonah Ray and Felicia Day. Taking place online at ShoutFactoryTV.com, or via the Shout! Factory TV app on Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire and select smart TVs, the trio will share six classic MST3K episodes that have never been screened as part of a Shout! Factory Turkey Day Marathon. Here’s hoping your favorite episode makes it (cough, Hobgoblins, cough.)

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CableTV.com
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Pop Culture
America's Favorite Reality Shows, By State
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CableTV.com

From aspiring crooners to housewives looking to settle scores, there are plenty of reality shows out there for every interest. But which ones are currently the most popular? To answer this question, CableTV.com mined Google Trends data to measure the most-watched “real-life” programs in each state. They broke their findings down in the map below.

The results: Residents of sunny California and Arizona are still Keeping Up With the Kardashians, while Texans love Little Women: Dallas. Louisianans can’t get enough of Duck Dynasty and in Utah, viewers are tuning in to Sister Wives.

See which other shows made the cut below, and afterwards, check out CableTV.com’s deep data dive from 2016 to see how our viewing preferences have changed over a year.

A map breaking down each state's favorite reality show, created by the CableTV.com team.
CableTV.com

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