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What You're Missing at TED2012 Right Now

As you and I sit here like dopes in front of our computers, a swarm of alpha nerds are basking in the Long Beach sun and enjoying TED2012. Only two talks from the show have been released so far, and they have somewhat differing messages: Abundance is Our Future (by Peter Diamandis) and The Earth is Full (by Paul Gilding). I'll go ahead and embed the latter, as it's a bit more depressing:

But I Want More!

Well, it's a tough gig, but somebody's gotta liveblog the entire conference. No, really! The Guardian's intrepid Carole Cadwalladr is posting dispatches from the conference, including some snippets that are delightfully bonkers when taken out of context. Here, let me decontextualize some of yesterday's coverage for you:

8.48am: ...And what if we could use lightning as GPS?

9.16am: Also, I have to mention that at the opening night party last night, I stumbled on two roboticists have a conversation about teledildonics.

And, yes, I've checked. That is an actual word.

9.45am: Ah...there's some sort of crowd-sourcing dancey performance art on now. Men in bodystockings throwing beach balls.

10.04am: The drones have taken over an electric organ and a proto-xylophone. And they're playing the James Bond theme tune!

12.40pm: Right. They're singing about pigeons dying now. I'll spare you the details...

Okay, that's enough cribbing from Cadwalladr's brilliance. You really just have to read it -- this is coverage by a nerd, for nerds, of nerds -- wonderful stuff.

The Party Line

If the live blog doesn't cut it for you, check out the official TED blog, featuring still photography and summaries of the talks. This is also where you'll find video as it's posted -- and it's slowly trickling out, as we're just starting the third day of the conference now. There's also a TED2012 Conference Page that includes a feed of @TEDNews, a boon for the Twitter-addicted (though @TEDchris is slightly more exciting). You can also watch the conference via live streaming video if you have a TED Live membership (but don't go rushing to buy -- membership starts at $995, though a good chunk of that is tax-deductible).

You might also appreciate the Program Guide, which tells us that today we'll see talks from John Hodgman, Jon Ronson, Philippe Petit, and Liz Diller (among many others).

Nanocopters Perform Bond Theme

To tide you over until more session videos are posted, here's (non-TED) video of Vijay Kumar's swarm of nanocopters performing the Bond theme:

Back to the Live Blog

As it approaches 8:30am Pacific, Cadwalladr is presumably about to begin Thursday coverage. I'm getting my popcorn. Oh, breaking news! Kumar's talk on "agile aerial robots" has just been posted!

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Apple Is Offering Free Battery Replacements for Some MacBook Models
iStock
iStock

Want to extend the life of your MacBook Pro battery? A new offer from Apple might let you replace it for free.

Some non Touch Bar, 13-inch MacBook Pros that were manufactured between October 2016 and October 2017 are eligible for the program, and you can see if your computer qualifies by entering your serial number on Apple’s website.

The company said some of the batteries in models manufactured during this one-year period may be faulty, which is what prompted the offer. Although it’s not a safety issue, a component in the battery could fail, causing the battery to expand. Affected customers who already paid to have their battery replaced can also contact Apple for a refund.

The service takes three to five days to complete and can be done at any Apple-authorized service provider or retail store. Computers can also be mailed in to a repair center.

Before sending it away for repairs, though, it's important to check for other issues with your computer. Apple notes, “If your 13-inch MacBook Pro has any damage which impairs the replacement of the battery, that issue will need to be resolved prior to the battery replacement. In some cases, there may be a cost associated with the repair.”

[h/t The Verge]

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Amazon Will Now Deliver Packages to Your Car Trunk
Amazon
Amazon

Delivery drivers call them “porch pirates.” It’s a derisive term for people who take advantage of the fact that many residents aren’t home during the day and swipe packages from doorsteps. Bad weather, nosy neighbors, or general privacy concerns may be other reasons you’re not comfortable leaving shipments unattended. Now, Amazon has a solution: Today, the company is introducing Amazon Key In-Car Delivery, a new method for dropping off packages that virtually guarantees they’ll be in one piece when you get home.

When shoppers opt for Amazon Key at checkout and own a vehicle that supports app-based unlocking, the delivery driver will be able to pop open your trunk and deposit your items inside. Essentially, your car doubles as a storage locker.

Your car may be sitting in your office parking lot during the day, but that’s no problem. Drivers will be able to pull up to your car there and make the same drop-off. When you’re done with work for the day, your packages will be waiting. Your car can be parked anywhere within a two-block radius of the delivery address and still be eligible for the service.

But how would a driver find it? The In-Car Delivery program requires a few things in order to work. For one, you need Amazon’s Key app; you also need to give the company permission to lock and unlock your vehicle. Your car must support app-based access, like 2015 or newer GM cars with OnStar subscriptions or recent-model Volvos with a Volvo On Call account. These vehicles have partnership agreements with Amazon that make them compatible with the Key software, as well as GPS functioning that allows drivers to find them when parked offsite. You’ll also need to be in one of 37 markets where Amazon dispatches their own delivery staff.

If this delivery approach is embraced, it’s likely that other carmakers will help Amazon widen their distribution platform. Amazon Key also offers in-home delivery service in select cities, which allows drivers entry into your home to leave packages inside.

[h/t TechCrunch]

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