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What the Original $1 Bill Looked Like

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I've been reading The End of Money, a book packed with tidbits about the history of money, with a special focus on the greenback. The book mentions former Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, who was in the enviable position of designing the original US $1 bill in 1862. So who do you think he put on that bill? Himself, of course. Chase wanted to be President, and he figured that having his face on popular currency would be killer buzz-marketing -- obviously, that didn't pan out. Above is a (suitably low-fi and non-counterfeity) image of that first dollar bill, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Chase's visage also graces the obverse of the 1929 $10,000 bill, as a kind of consolation prize for his demotion from $1 fame. Other relevant fun facts: the "P" in Salmon P. Chase stands for "Portland"; Chase National Bank was named after him (though he wasn't actually involved in its operation); and in 1869 George Washington replaced Chase on our $1 notes -- by that time, Chase was a member of the Supreme Court, busily declaring his own creation of the greenback to be unconstitutional. You had a good (seven-year) run, Salmon.

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This Tool Knows If Robots Are Coming for Your Job
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If you work as a cashier, you may want to polish your resume. According to the online tool “Will Robots Take My Job?” there’s a 97 percent chance your position will be replaced with technology in the not-too-distant future. Pharmacists, on the other hand, can breathe easier—they face a 1.2 percent risk level of unemployment by automation.

As Geek.com reports, the website, developed by Mubashar Iqbal and designed by Dimitar Raykov, can calculate the stability of 702 jobs. It pulls its data from a 2013 report titled "The Future of Employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?” The original study projects that 47 percent of U.S. jobs risk becoming obsolete as technology advances.

To see which side of the workforce your occupation falls on, type your title into the search bar on the main page. The tool brings up your automation risk level (ranging from “Totally safe” to "You are doomed”), the job’s projected growth, and median salary and employment numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

With some positions, like bank tellers (risk level of 98 percent) and telemarketers (99 percent), apps and automations are already starting to phase out human beings. Fortunately, there are still plenty of tasks a robot can’t be programmed to execute. So people with creative jobs, like writing songs or naming paint colors, are safe for now.

[h/t Geek]

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Haldean Brown via Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0
Toblerone Now Has Fewer Triangles—and Customers Are Outraged
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Haldean Brown via Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

UK fans of the Swiss chocolate bar Toblerone are in for a rude awakening when they peel back the candy’s iconic triangular package: In an effort to cut costs, Toblerone’s makers Mondelez International have redesigned the bar with fewer peaks—and consumers definitely mind the gap.

As The Guardian reports, the decision to reduce the weight of their UK product was made in light of rising ingredient prices. Toblerone wrote on their Facebook page: "…to ensure Toblerone remains on-shelf, is affordable and retains the triangular shape, we have had to reduce the weight of just two of our bars in the UK." Those two bars, the 400-gram and the 170-gram, are now 360 grams and 150 grams respectively thanks to large gaps where there were once solid chocolate chunks.

Unsurprisingly, Toblerone’s customer base hasn't embraced the change. One Twitter user characterized the redesign as "a chocolate bar of disappointment" while another compared it to a bicycle rack. The classic look, originally meant to evoke the Swiss Alps, is now more reminiscent of Holland in the opinion of one Facebook commenter.

Toblerone’s announcement didn’t mention Brexit by name, but that hasn’t stopped some angered chocolate lovers from making the connection. Since the UK’s vote to leave the European Union in June, the devaluation of the British pound has had an impact on everything from model trains to Marmite. A shortage of the latter sent buyers into a panic last month before the pricing dispute between supermarkets and the maker was quickly settled. Toblerone fans aren't feeling so optimistic about the outcome of this latest Brexit casualty:

[h/t The Guardian]

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