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Morning Cup of Links: Oscars and Razzies

Find out the winners of the 2012 Academy Awards, and read what they said that was worth remembering. But most important, see what they wore.
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Even more interesting, the annual Razzie Awards celebrate the worst films of 2011. The nominations are out, and one film was so bad, it got 12 nominations in ten categories.
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Mysterious brown lights have been seen in the mountains of North Carolina for decades. Plenty of people are investigating them, and making money from them.
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In a breakthrough that will affect cosplay and furry cultures, researchers in Tokyo have developed a cat mask that can be controlled by the wearer's facial movements. They also have some useful applications in mind.
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The Black Diamond Jet Team performs aerial acrobatics. Watching from the pilot's POV, your brain tells you it's okay, while your stomach waits for the crash.
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Teller Reveals His Secrets. Magicians use their knowledge of perception, attention, and human nature to create illusions, but that doesn't ruin the magic.
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Gatonovela is a soap opera starring cats. This episode involves a Mexican drug cartel throwing its weight around.
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Siberia's Altai Mountains are beautiful and wild and hard to live in. So instead, you can look at some fascinating photos.
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Chandra Bahadur Dangi of Nepal has been recognized as the world's shortest man. At 21.5 inches tall and 72 years old, he finally got tired of being overlooked.
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An advisory committee recommended the FDA approve the anti-obesity drug Qnexa, which had previously been rejected. The obesity epidemic calls for "desperate measures," despite the risks.
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A Brief History of Newspaper Endorsements. Which will probably fade completely away soon.

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Animals
25 Benefits of Adopting a Rescue Dog
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According to the ASPCA, 3.3 million dogs enter shelters each year in the United States. Although that number has gone down since 2011 (from 3.9 million) there are still millions of dogs waiting in shelters for a forever home. October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month; here are 25 benefits of adopting a shelter dog.

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fun
How Urban Legends Like 'The Licked Hand' Are Born
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If you compare the scary stories you heard as a kid with those of your friends—even those who grew up across the country from you—you’ll probably hear some familiar tales. Maybe you tried to summon Bloody Mary by chanting her name in front of the mirror three times in a dark bathroom. Maybe you learned never to wonder what’s under a woman’s neck ribbon. Maybe you heard the one about the girl who feels her dog lick her hand in the middle of the night, only to wake up to find him hanging dead from the shower nozzle, the words “humans can lick too” written on the wall in the dog’s blood.

These ubiquitous, spooky folk tales exist everywhere, and a lot of them take surprisingly similar forms. How does a single story like the one often called “Humans Can Lick Too” or "The Licked Hand" make its way into every slumber party in America? Thrillist recently investigated the question with a few experts, finding that most of these stories have very deep roots.

In the case of The Licked Hand, its origins go back more than a century. In the 1990s, Snopes found that a similar motif dates back to an Englishman’s diary entry from 1871. In it, the diary keeper, Dearman Birchall, retold a story he heard at a party of a man whose wife woke him up in the middle of the night, urging him to go investigate what sounded like burglars in their home. He told his wife that it was only the dog, reaching out his hand. He felt the dog lick his hand … but in the morning, all his valuables were gone: He had clearly been robbed.

A similar theme shows up in the short story “The Diary of Mr. Poynter,” published in 1919 by M.R. James. In it, a character dozes off in an armchair, and thinks that he is petting his dog. It turns out, it’s some kind of hairy human figure that he flees from. The story seems to have evolved from there into its presently popular form, picking up steam in the 1960s. As with any folk tale, its exact form changes depending on the teller: sometimes the main character is an old lady, other times it’s a young girl.

You’ll probably hear these stories in the context of happening to a “friend of a friend,” making you more likely to believe the tale. It practically happened to someone you know! Kind of! The setting, too, is probably somewhere nearby. It might be in your neighborhood, or down by the local railroad tracks.

Thrillist spoke to Dr. Joseph Stubbersfield, a researcher in the UK who studies urban legends, who says the kind of stories that spread widely contain both social information and emotional resonance. Meaning they contain a message—you never know who’s lurking in your house—and are evocative.

If something is super scary or gross, you want to share it. Stories tend to warn against something: A study of English-language urban legends circulating online found that most warned listeners about the hazards of life (poisonous plants, dangerous animals, dangerous humans) rather than any kind of opportunities. We like to warn each other of the dangers that could be lurking around every corner, which makes sense considering our proven propensity to focus on and learn from negative information. And yes, that means telling each other to watch out for who’s licking our hands in the middle of the night.

Just something to keep in mind as you eagerly await Jezebel’s annual scary story contest.

[h/t Thrillist]

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