Weekend Links: The Spookiest Places On Earth

What were your favorite literary characters intended to look like? Casting directors will have their own ideas that sometimes do (and many times don't) add up with what we imagined in our minds. But what did the authors intend? "The Composites" takes literary descriptions and plugs them into law enforcement software to get an idea of the faces as described. Very weird and definitely in the uncanny valley!
*
It may not be near Halloween, but it is dark and wintry, and a good time to snuggle up reading about the 10 Most Terrifying Places on Earth (eeeek!)
*
For my fellow weather nerds (or anybody looking to get the most accurate forecasts), Slate did a thoughtful piece on one of my favorite sites, Weather Underground, and how they have built the most comprehensive "micro" weather site in America. (Side note: I used the Readability link because I LOVE Readability - it's free and amazing for browsing news!)
*

Nostalgia time: here are 48 pictures from the 90s that perfectly capture the decade. Big thanks to my friend Ryan for these, who said "My favorite is probably Madonna, Sting and 2pac at dinner together." For me it's probably the Lisa Frank shout out. Maybe JTT.
*
Or, going back even further, how about a look at skateboarding in New York in the 1960s? I give people grief for having selective amnesia about the "good times" in the past, but this really does look like a pretty good time all around.
*
This video of a historic bridge being demolished in mere seconds is cool … and then a little sad. For all of the planning and work and struggle that goes into building a bridge, it's astonishing how quickly it can be turned to dust!
*
So … what exactly happens to the Coke in Coca-Cola? (And as a side-note, the beverage was invented by Dr. Pemberton in my hometown of Columbus, Georgia, not Atlanta! Though Dr. Pemberton did move there and that's when it really took off. It's a point of pride for Columbus, I can't just let it slip!)
*
From the Department of Procrastination: strange physics-based interactive objects to play around with - you can click "random" at the top bar for more!
*
For those of you who have watched multiple HBO shows (or in my case … all of them …) you'll probably notice quite a few familiar faces. You can thank the "HBO Recycling Program" (in the form of a handy interactive chart) for that - or some very smart casting directors who know how to hang on to talent! And completely unintentionally, I seem to have brought things full circle.
***
Stay tuned - more links tomorrow! In the meantime, send your submissions to FlossyLinks@gmail.com

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
iStock
iStock

Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
Bone Collector
iStock
iStock

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios