From Sonic Youth's Guitars to LA Tubas: 4 Famous Stolen Instruments

1. Sonic Youth’s Guitars

Fans of the rock band Sonic Youth were shocked to see an online letter from guitarist Lee Ranaldo in July 1999 complaining that a thief had broken into the band’s truck and stolen its equipment before a gig (warning: some NSFW language). The stolen goods included everything from guitars to amps to drums, although Ranaldo warned that some of it was “mostly older and either very modified and/or f***ed up/beat up.” Still, the band was forced to purchase all new equipment for the rest of their shows and recording sessions.

Slowly, some of the equipment has been coming back. In 2005, two guitars were returned to the band by a man claiming to be the nephew of one of the original thieves. And in 2009, a Sonic Youth fan in the Netherlands saw a red and orange guitar on eBay that looked like one of the stolen instruments. He outbid the competition and posted the news on a message board with the title “The OH MY GOD! I BOUGHT ONE OF SONIC YOUTH'S STOLEN GUITARS thread.” He contacted the band and returned the guitar, which was confirmed to be Ranaldo’s. There’s still plenty of equipment missing, so fans should be advised to keep an eye out on eBay.

2. The Tubas of Los Angeles

Band teachers and school officials are baffled by a string of thefts in the Los Angeles area. The loot? Not computers or money, but tubas. In the past year, there have been 23 tubas reported stolen from L.A. schools. Security footage has even shown thieves breaking in and specifically targeting tubas and sousaphones, bypassing anything more valuable or easier to carry.

Police haven’t been able to figure out what’s behind the crime spree. Some think the instruments are being sold for scrap metal. But others say there’s a booming black market for the instruments due to the growing craze of banda music. Banda, a dance music similar to polka, uses the tuba as its strong bass, putting the instrument in high demand. According to the Los Angeles Times a high-end tuba sells for $5,000, but a beat-up one stolen from a school could bring in as much as $2,000.

3. Stradivarius Violins

With just some 450 Stradivarius violins still around today, it’s incredible to note how many have been stolen. For example, one violin, worth about $2 million, was nabbed in 2010 from a London sandwich shop right under the nose of violinist Min-Jin Kym. The thieves were nabbed less than a month later after trying to sell the instrument to a stranger for around $150 (they were seen in an Internet café looking up “Stradivarius”). But the violin has not been found and investigators fear it is no longer in Britain.

Another missing Strad remained MIA for nearly 50 years after being stolen from the Carnegie Hall dressing room of Bronislaw Huberman in 1936. It was only recovered in 1985, when violinist Julian Altman made a death bed confession to his wife that the violin he had been playing for years was the same one that had been snatched. Whether Altman actually took it is still unclear (he claimed he bought it on the night of the theft). It actually marked the second time that violin had been stolen – the first time, the instrument was recovered a few days later. That violin now belongs to classical superstar Joshua Bell.

One of the more famous stolen violins may actually have never been stolen, but the $800,000 Duke of Alcantara violin did fall into a sensational ownership struggle. The instrument was being watched by UCLA musician David Margetts in 1967 when it went missing while he was running errands. He says it may have been stolen or he may have left it on the roof of his car and driven away, but either way the violin somehow ended up on the side of the highway. The instrument was found and later passed down to a number of unsuspecting owners until it ended up in the hands of musician Teresa Salvato. When a music repair shop realized what she had, she and the university got in a lengthy court battle over the instrument before it was finally returned. For more details, the Los Angeles Times tracked the instrument’s fascinating path, although the story came before the final settlement.

4. Rosanne Cash’s Guitar

To anyone, a guitar signed by Johnny Cash would be valuable. But to Johnny’s daughter, Rosanne, the guitar given to her with a note from her father was priceless. So she was heartbroken when she got off a plane in 1979 and found out the guitar had not arrived with her. The guitar has not yet turned up, but Cash hasn't given up hope that it will be returned, especially since it's inscribed to her and can't be mistaken for another.

Tuba image by flickr user the justified sinner.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
The Star Trek Theme Song Has Lyrics
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The Star Trek theme song is familiar to pretty much anyone who lived in the free world (and probably elsewhere, too) in the late 20th century. The tune is played during the show's opening credits; a slightly longer version is played, accompanied by stills from various episodes, during the closing credits. The opening song is preceded by William Shatner (as Captain Kirk) doing his now-legendary monologue recitation, which begins: "Space, the final frontier ..."

The show's familiar melody was written by respected film and TV composer Alexander Courage, who said the Star Trek theme's main inspiration was the Richard Whiting song "Beyond the Blue Horizon." In Courage's contract it was stipulated that, as the composer, he would receive royalties every time the show was aired and the theme song played. If, somehow, Star Trek made it into syndication—which, of course, it ultimately did—Courage stood to make a lot of money. And so did the person who wrote the lyrics.

WAIT... THERE WERE LYRICS?

Gene Roddenberry, the show's creator, wrote lyrics to the theme song.

"Beyond the rim of the star-light,
my love is wand'ring in star-flight!"

Why would Roddenberry even bother?

The lyrics were never even meant to be heard on the show, but not because the network (NBC) nixed them. Roddenberry nixed them himself. Roddenberry wanted a piece of the composing profits, so he wrote the hokey lyrics solely to receive a "co-writer" credit.

"I know he'll find in star-clustered reaches
Love, strange love a star woman teaches."

As one of the composers, Roddenberry received 50 percent of the royalties ... cutting Alexander Courage's share in half. Not surprisingly, Courage was furious about the deal. Though it was legal, he admitted, it was unethical because Roddenberry had contributed nothing to why the music was successful.

Roddenberry was unapologetic. According to Snopes, he once declared, "I have to get some money somewhere. I'm sure not gonna get it out of the profits of Star Trek."

In 1969, after Star Trek officially got the ax, no one (Courage and Roddenberry included) could possibly have imagined the show's great popularity and staying power.

Courage, who only worked on two shows in Star Trek's opening season because he was busy working on the 1967 Dr. Doolittle movie, vowed he would never return to Star Trek.

He never did.

THE WORDS

If you're looking for an offbeat karaoke number, here are Roddenberry's lyrics, as provided by Snopes:

Beyond
The rim of the star-light
My love
Is wand'ring in star-flight
I know
He'll find in star-clustered reaches
Love,
Strange love a star woman teaches.
I know
His journey ends never
His star trek
Will go on forever.
But tell him
While he wanders his starry sea
Remember, remember me.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Ralph Gatti, AFP/Getty Images
The 'David Bowie Is' Exhibition Is Coming to Your Smartphone
 Ralph Gatti, AFP/Getty Images
Ralph Gatti, AFP/Getty Images

"David Bowie is," an exhibition dedicated to the life, work, and legacy of the pop icon, concluded its six-year world tour on July 15. If you didn't get a chance to see it in person at its final stop at New York City's Brooklyn Museum, you can still experience the exhibit at home. As engadget reports, the artifacts displayed in the collection will be recreated in virtual and augmented reality.

The Victoria and Albert Museum, the curator of the exhibit, and the David Bowie Archive are collaborating with Sony Music Entertainment and the sound and media studio Planeta on the new project, "David Bowie is Virtual." Like the physical exhibition, the digital experience will integrate visual scenes with the music of David Bowie: 3D scans will bring the musician's costumes and personal items into the virtual sphere, allowing viewers to examine them up close, and possibly in the case of the outfits, try them on.

"These new digital versions of ‘David Bowie is’ will add unprecedented depth and intimacy to the exhibition experience, allowing the viewer to engage with the work of one of the world’s most popular and influential artists as never before," the announcement of the project reads. "Both the visual richness of this show and the visionary nature of Bowie and his art makes this a particularly ideal candidate for a VR/AR adaptation."

"David Bowie is Virtual" will be released for smartphones and all major VR and AR platforms sometimes this fall. Like the museum exhibition, it will come with an admission price, with a portion of the proceeds going toward the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Brooklyn Museum.

[h/t engadget]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios