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At the Libraries: Finding a Home for 30,000 Books

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Each week Miss Kathleen provides links to a variety of stories about libraries, authors, and books. If there’s something noteworthy going on in your local library, leave us a comment!

Happy belated Presidents' Day! If you weren't able to celebrate properly on Monday, try visiting DC's new Center for Education and Leadership, where you can see this 3-story-tall tower of books all about Abraham Lincoln. Amazing!
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Do you come home after a relaxing day of wandering with MORE books? Yeah, me too.

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But hey, if you have the space to house an extra 30,000 books, you should give this couple a call. They need a new home for their Land Library!
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Wow! NYPL is back on track to renovate some of its biggest branches to the tune of a billion dollars. That'll be worth a visit for sure. Should be done in 10 or 12 years, right?
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Oh dear, more library staff pilfering funds! Stop giving us a bad name!
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Here's your weekly dose of book sculpture! One, a book of life (above) created by David Kracov, and two, a head (below) carved page-by-page with surgical tools by Brian Dettmer.

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If you can't already guess what Jonathan Franzen thinks of e-books, here's a taste.
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Another election year, another set of awful, "patriotic" books by political wives. There's something here for Democrats and Republicans, but where is Carol Paul's book?
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Let's end with a video — a movie, actually. It's 15 minutes long, but for book lovers like us, it's some of the nicest 15 minutes you could find. Do yourself a favor and watch "The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore."
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Thanks as always for reading, and let me just say, one more time, for the record: Yes, I know what The Onion is. Honestly, guys! Email me with your library and literary tidbits and I will see you next week!

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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