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4 TV Show Inaccuracies

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This week, I’m down in Austin doing some work, which has been wonderful on many levels seeing as, for starters, I somehow got to be mumble-mumble-years-old without ever stepping foot in Texas. But also because I’ve now had the good fortune of meeting one of our newest _flossers (and dare I say already one of my favorite all-time _flossers), Kathy Benjamin.

Last night, Kathy, her affable husband Simon, and I got to talking about Downton Abbey, what with it being the season finale and all. I’m a big fan of the show, but Kathy, who wants to love it, has trouble because of some of the inaccuracies. I told her she should write a post highlighting some of the more egregious ones, which I think she’s going to work on soon. In the meantime, there’s this listacle I’ve culled together this morning. As always, if you guys think I missed an important one, let us know in the comments below...

1. Kill the mice!

This inaccuracy is seen on dozens of TV shows from The Big Bang Theory to CSI. All genres, all networks, all studios, no one seems to care that computer mice (and/or touchpads on laptops) are virtually essential to get any kind of real computing done. But the blocking only calls for typing! Check out the video below for an example of what I mean. Really NCIS? Really?

2. Mad Men penalty

In one episode of Mad Men, which takes place in 1964, Don Draper is seen watching an NFL football game on a Saturday night. This would have been impossible given that prime-time NFL football didn’t begin until 1970.

3. When in Rome...

Centurions on horseback certainly look dapper in their chain mail, but they were historically inaccurate, predating the actual use of such defense garments by several hundred years. Likewise, some of the religious rituals, like the taurobolium scene (blood from the sacrificed bull) are depicted hundreds of years before they were introduced to the Italian region.

4. Got themselves a gun, problem

Often in The Sopranos, characters could be seen firing Berreta M9s and other automatic pistols. But more than 15 shots require additional magazines and there are always awkward slides to contend with that we never saw much on the show.

Have an inaccuracy that’s been bugging you? Now is your time to vent!

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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