Weekend Links: Literal Interpretations of Music Videos

From the Department of What If? Black and white photo mock-ups from 1899 that visually ponder, what if London was like Venice?
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You guys know I am on a time lapse kick right now, so here are few offerings for your viewing pleasure -- First up: an Australian time lapse medley.
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Next: "Appalachian nocturne" - a lovely time lapse video tour of the US east coast seen from space (Atlanta looks strangely far to the west of where I always think we are).
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Finally, a stunning time-lapse of Iceland’s nightless summer. Beautiful.
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From Lucy, "What the nanny saw: Housekeeper's stunning images of 1950s Chicago show working life in America in a new light" (despite the source having some totally incorrect captions, the pictures are still amazing!)
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I think I'm really late to this train, but now that I know about it I can't help post this everywhere. Literal translations of music videos, starting with "Take On Me" and "Total Eclipse Of the Heart," but there are tons more! (Thanks to my friend Chandler for showing me the light).
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Flossy reader James sent in these delightfully geeky hockey jerseys designed for "The Last Starfighter," "Battlestar Gallactica" and "Game of Thrones." I really want a Team Direwolves one!
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It's been a while since I've had a Robot Revolution update - all quiet on the robot front? Hardly! They've just been quietly building things like this highly mobile, semi-autonomous four-legged robot ...
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Much like tattoos, plastic surgery (minus the plastic part, which apparently came into being in the 1818s from the Greek word "plastikos," meaning to mold or give form) or body modification has been in practice since ancient times.
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"Syria continues to be in the news as its government persists in its use of violence to crack down on protests inspired by the Arab Spring. It is the latest of many upheavals the country has been through since its formation as a state. In the northwest of the country are reminders of past turmoil and upheaval. Over 700 abandoned settlements bear the collective name The Dead Cities of Syria."
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Stay tuned - more links on the way tomorrow! In the meantime, send your submissions to FlossyLinks@gmail.com, or send me a Tweet.

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College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
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One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

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North America: East or West Coast?
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