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Taylor Wilson at the White House

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

Last summer we ran a profile of Taylor Wilson in mental_floss magazine. Today the kid was at the White House!

Here's what he was doing there, according to WhiteHouse.gov:

President Barack Obama hosts the second White House Science Fair celebrating the student winners of a broad range of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) competitions from across the country, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Feb. 7, 2012. Taylor Wilson, 17, of Reno, Nevada, conducted research on novel techniques for detecting nuclear threats and developed an environmentally friendly, cost-effective, and highly sensitive system capable of detecting small quantities of nuclear material.

We're getting a ton of search traffic on "Taylor Wilson" right now, so here's a link to that article:

Mad Scientist of the Month

by Judy Dutton

At 10, he built his first bomb. At 14, he made a nuclear reactor. Now he’s 17…

Read the full story: Who’s Afraid of Taylor Wilson?

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