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11 Charts and Graphs About Television Shows

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Television is one thing that unites people across the country, in that almost everyone watches at least some. However, the landscape of TV offerings has expanded so much with hundreds of cable channels available, that you need a chart to keep up with it. Or many charts. Since I always get a kick out of the entertaining charts people make, I've rounded up a few that try to make sense out of all these television shows.

1. Line/Bar Graphs: Sci-Fi TV

Internet citizens have a particular love for science fiction, compared to the population as a whole, which is understandable among folks who embrace technology. These are also the type of people who like to make and read charts and graphs. Stephanie Fox of io9 made an extensive pair of graphs that show how various types of science fiction TV have evolved since 1970. I had to snip it to show here; you can see the full version at io9.

2. Flowchart: Selecting a Science Fiction Series on Netflix

If the current science-fiction offerings on TV don't appeal to your particular tastes, there are many available on Netflix. Watching years of series at a time takes some commitment, so you may want to use this handy flowchart to select a series you aren't already familiar with. This is a large chart; only the beginning point is shown here.

3. Venn Diagram: TV for Math Geeks

song chart memes

It's a good thing that reruns are available, since ultra-geeky TV shows are few and far between. There is one favorite show those in the math-based disciplines can agree on, and The Big Bang Theory's biggest fans may well resemble the characters on the show. The person who is so invested in the selection of these shows that he/she made a Venn diagram about it is apparently so into a chosen discipline that he/she neglected to learn how to spell.

In 2012, reality shows dominate our TV channels. They are much less expensive to produce than classic TV sitcoms and dramas, and people watch them. The definition of reality TV covers a lot of ground, from jobs to game shows to documentaries, so that the only thing they have in common is that they are referred to as "unscripted." And there are too many of them to include them all in one chart or graph.

4. Diagram: The Intersecting World of Reality TV

If you ever flip through the cable TV channels, you’ve probably noticed how many reality series cluster around an existing idea. Yes, there’s a lot of shows set in Louisiana. And quite a few set in Alaska, too. I once quipped that a network sees no use in wasting a field office on just one show, or two, or three. But what you see here is just a small portion of the Reality TV Venn Diagram by Margaret Lyons and Jen Cotton. The whole chart is much more extensive.

If you can't read it here, see the full-size version of overlapping ideas at Vulture. And yes, I am aware that this is actually an Euler diagram, which shows existing sets and relationships, and not a true Venn diagram that would show all possible relationships.

5. Flowchart: Proof That 99% of Reality TV Started With The Hills

You may have noticed that the success of one reality TV series spawns others that are somewhat similar. This is no accident; networks that must churn out content to cover several channels 24 hours a day need new ideas, but caution leads to "new ideas" that have some relation to "old ideas." Here's a flowchart by amypiehoneybunch that traces the origins of many reality series back to the MTV series The Hills. If someone would do a chart like this for job-based reality shows, they would probably all descend from Dirty Jobs, which first aired in 2003.

6. Pie Chart: Reality TV content

funny graphs and charts

After a while, all these reality shows start to look the same, owing to the formula they all seem to use. Even within a series, the narration tends to use the same catchphrases over and over. Take, for example, the series Gold Rush Alaska.

Do you think they are trying to tell us something? Parker is now in the process of deciding whether and where to go to college.

7. Pie Chart: Important Qualities of a Reality TV Mother

You've heard that the lure of reality TV is that we feel better about ourselves when we see other people messing up their lives. More likely we are drawn to train wreck reality shows because people messing up their lives is something out of the ordinary. That's nice to know. These important qualities plotted by Cheeseboy may not make a good mother, but they make an interesting TV show.

8. Euler Diagram: Unified Theory of Primetime TV

You can plot TV shows by genre (sitcom, drama, or reality), or by subject (such as the intersecting reality shows above), or you can classify them by other criteria. This Euler diagram, compiled by Joshua David Stein for Esquire magazine, classifies shows by both subject and tone, so you can select your poison accordingly. If you can't read the names of the shows in the margins, see the enlargeable version.

9. Scatter Plot: Viewer's Political Leanings

Even political leanings are charted by TV show preference. This chart comes from an article about Donald Trump and his demand to see President Obama's birth certificate last year, but it carries information for shows besides Celebrity Apprentice. It appears that there is no such thing as a Republican that doesn't vote, or maybe they just don't watch much TV. Also, Desperate Housewives crosses the political spectrum. Take a look at the full size version.

10. Flowchart: TV to Watch in 2012

So what should you watch on TV? This very recent flowchart can help you, but you may have to enlist the help of your favorite libation to decide. It's shown bigger at The Faster Times.

11. A + B = BBC

This one's a little different, but I'm including it because it appeared in a recent edition of mental_floss magazine.

Chart Fans! See Also...

Run Your Life with Flowcharts!
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Fun with Flowcharts
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7 Geeky Flowcharts
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7 Brilliant and/or Baffling Flowcharts
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7 Flowcharts for Fun
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10 Funny Flowcharts
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10 Clever and Confusing Flowcharts
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10 Funny and Fabulous Flowcharts
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10 Venn and Not-quite-Venn Diagrams
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Fun with Venn and Euler Diagrams
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9 Silly Venn Diagrams
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Fun with Pie Charts

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Courtesy of Crumbs & Whiskers
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Animals
Inside Crumbs & Whiskers, the Bicoastal Cat Cafe That's Saving Kitties' Lives
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Courtesy of Crumbs & Whiskers

It took a backpacking trip to Thailand and a bit of serendipity for Kanchan Singh to realize her life goal of saving cats while serving lattes. “I met these two guys on the road [in 2014], and we became friends,” Singh tells Mental Floss about Crumbs & Whiskers, the bicoastal cat cafe she founded in Washington, D.C. in 2015 which, in addition to selling coffee and snacks, fosters adoptable felines from shelters. “They soon noticed that I was feeding every stray dog and cat in sight," and quickly picked up on the fact that their traveling companion was crazy about all things furry and fluffy.

On Singh’s final day in Thailand, which happened to be her birthday, her friends surprised her with a celebratory trip to a cat cafe in the city of Chiang Mai. “I remember walking in there being like, ‘This is the coolest, most amazing, weirdest thing I’ve ever done,'” Singh recalls. “I just connected with it so much on a spiritual level.”

Singh informed her friends that she planned to return to the U.S., quit her corporate consulting job, and open up her own cat cafe in the nation’s capital. They thought she was joking. But three years and two storefronts later, the joke is on everyone except for Singh—and the kitties she and her team have helped to rescue.

A customer pets cats while drinking coffee at the flagship Washington, D.C. location of cat cafe Crumbs & Whiskers.
A customer pets cats while drinking coffee at the flagship Washington, D.C. location of cat cafe Crumbs & Whiskers.
Courtesy of Crumbs & Whiskers

Washington, D.C. customers stroke a furry feline while enjoying coffee at cat cafe Crumbs & Whiskers.
Washington, D.C. customers stroke a furry feline while enjoying coffee at Crumbs & Whiskers.
Courtesy of Crumbs & Whiskers

Crumbs & Whiskers—which, in addition to its flagship D.C. location, also has a Los Angeles outpost—keeps a running count of the cats they've saved from risk of euthanasia and those who have been adopted. At press time, those numbers were 776 and 388, respectively, between the brand’s two locations.

Prices and services vary between establishments, but customers can typically expect to shell out anywhere from $6.50 to $35 to enjoy coffee time with cats (food and drinks are prepared off-site for health and safety reasons), activities like cat yoga sessions, or, in D.C., an entire day of coworking with—you guessed it—cats. Patrons can also participate in the occasional promotion or campaign, ranging from Black Friday fundraisers for shelter kitties to writing an ex-flame's name inside a litter box around Valentine's Day (where the cats will then do their business).

Cat cafes have existed in Asia for nearly 20 years, with the world’s first known one, Cat Flower Garden, opening in Taipei, Taiwan in 1998. The trend gained traction in Japan during the mid 2000s, and quickly spread across Asia. But when Singh visited Chiang Mai, the cat cafe craze—while alive and thriving in Thailand—had not yet hit the U.S. "Why does Thailand get this, but not the U.S.?" Singh remembers thinking.

Once she arrived back home in D.C., Singh set her sights on founding the nation’s first official cat cafe, launching a successful Kickstarter campaign that helped her secure a two-story space in the city’s Georgetown neighborhood. Ultimately, though, she was beat to the punch by the Cat Town Cafe in Oakland, California, which opened to the public in 2014, followed shortly after by establishments like New York City’s Meow Parlour.

LA customers at cat cafe Crumbs & Whiskers
LA customers at cat cafe Crumbs & Whiskers
Courtesy of Crumbs & Whiskers

Still, Crumbs & Whiskers—which officially launched in D.C. in the summer of 2015—was among the nation’s first wave of businesses (and the District's first) to offer customers the chance to enjoy feline companionship with a side of java, along with the opportunity to maybe even save a tiny life. Ultimately, the altruistic concept proved to be so successful that Singh, sensing a market for a similar storefront in Los Angeles, opened up a second location there in the fall of 2016. "I always felt like what L.A. is, culturally, just fits with the type of person that would go to a cat café," she says.

Someday, Singh hopes to bring Crumbs & Whiskers to Chicago and New York, and “for cat cafes as a concept, as an industry, to grow,” she says. “I think that it would be great for this to be the future of adoptions and animal rescues.” Until then, you can learn more about Crumbs & Whiskers (and the animals they rescue) by stopping by if you're in D.C. and LA, or by visiting their website.

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LEGO Ideas
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Design
Fans of The Office, Rejoice: A Dunder Mifflin LEGO Set Could Someday Become a Reality
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LEGO Ideas

After nine seasons filled with pranks, gags, awkward jokes, and just a few too many “That’s what she said's,” the finale of NBC’s The Office aired on May 16, 2013. While the beloved show probably won’t be getting a reboot anytime soon, LEGO fans may someday be able to recreate the cast’s shenanigans with their very own Dunder Mifflin-inspired set.

Jaijai Lewis, a 36-year-old market researcher from New York City, has submitted a toy recreation of the fictional paper sales company’s Scranton branch to the LEGO Ideas website. It’s a miniature replica of the TV show's titular office, complete with the main shared space (cubicles and desk plants included), a conference room, and separate offices for Michael and Darryl. These rooms are designed to be modular, and can either be connected together or remain separate.

Of course, Lewis made sure to include mini-replicas of the whole gang, including Michael, Jim, Pam, Dwight, Angela, Meredith, and more. They come with tiny accessories, like Michael’s Golden Dundie, Meredith’s water bottle, and Pam’s ring. (The last one fits in Jim’s suitcase.)

If 10,000 different fans support a design on the LEGO Ideas blog, it will become eligible for review to become a real-life product. The LEGO Dunder Mifflin has already hit the coveted 10K number, so with any luck, you could eventually see it on the shelves of a toy store near you.

Check out some pictures of Lewis’s design below, or visit the LEGO Ideas site for more details.

LEGO fan Jaijai Lewis's design of the Dunder Mifflin Paper Company, Inc., a fictional paper company from NBC's TV show 'The Office.'
LEGO Ideas

LEGO fan Jaijai Lewis's design of the Dunder Mifflin Paper Company, Inc., a fictional paper company from NBC's TV show 'The Office.'
LEGO Ideas

LEGO fan Jaijai Lewis's design of the Dunder Mifflin Paper Company, Inc., a fictional paper company from NBC's TV show 'The Office.'
LEGO Ideas

LEGO fan Jaijai Lewis's design of the Dunder Mifflin Paper Company, Inc., a fictional paper company from NBC's TV show 'The Office.'
LEGO Ideas

LEGO fan Jaijai Lewis's design of the Dunder Mifflin Paper Company, Inc., a fictional paper company from NBC's TV show 'The Office.'
LEGO Ideas

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