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Weekend Links: What's Your Blues Name?

From our own Stacy Conradt, the sad but fascinating tale of a young boy killed in 1909 while trying to avoid birthday kisses.
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This "find your Blues name" chart was passed around Facebook this week, and I look forward to reading some new permutations - post yours! You can call me Fat Harp Smith from now on, by the way.
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The very classiest of ways to respond to some jerk who let their cell phone ring during a performance: violist Lukas Kmits incorporates the melody into his repertoire. And then hopefully the other patrons slap the offender. At events like this I fear the accidental ring so much I turn the whole thing off!
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It's been about a year since I posted this, and feel it's time for it to be revisited - check out this exhaustively satisfying look into the TV show "The Wire" … as a Victorian novel (the faux drawings and page excerpts slay me).
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BuzzFeed presents 11 Animals Who Think They're in Star Wars.
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From the Annals of Too Much Time: copycat videos that just seem to get better and better. Start with Video 3 (the original), then go to 1 followed by 2. That order will increase appreciation for the real star. (Thanks to Ben for this link!)

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In a somewhat similar vein (and I have to quote the exact title here, you'll see why): "this kitchen DJ will cerealsly bowl you over."
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Here's a nice little chart on how much certain animals sleep. I'm closer to a baboon than a human in my patterns, personally. Possibly a squirrel monkey.
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You know I can't turn away a time-lapse video! I love these things. This one, of Yosemite National Park, is particularly lovely.
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And let's end with one of fellow _flosser David Israel's recent Twaggies. For more great tweets illustrated, visit the Twaggies section of GoComics.
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Hope everyone had a great weekend! Don't forget to send your link submissions to FlossyLinks@Gmail.com, or you can always Tweet me.

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New AI-Driven Music System Analyzes Tracks for Perfect Playlists
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Whether you're planning a bachelorette party or recovering from a breakup, a well-curated playlist makes all the difference. If you don't have time to pick the perfect songs manually, services that use the AI-driven system Sonic Style may be able to figure out exactly what you have in mind based on your request.

According to Fast Company, Sonic Style is the new music-categorizing service from the media and entertainment data provider Gracenote. There are plenty of music algorithms out there already, but Sonic Style works a little differently. Rather than listing the entire discography of a certain artist under a single genre, the AI analyzes individual tracks. It considers factors like the artist's typical genre and the era the song was recorded in, as well as qualities it can only learn through listening, like tempo and mood. Based on nearly 450 descriptors, it creates a super-accurate "style profile" of the track that makes it easier for listeners to find it when searching for the perfect song to fit an occasion.

Playlists that use data from Sonic Style feel like they were made by a person with a deep knowledge of music rather than a machine. That's thanks to the system's advanced neural network. It also recognizes artists that don't fit neatly into one genre, or that have evolved into a completely different music style over their careers. Any service—including music-streaming platforms and voice-activated assistants—that uses Gracenote's data will be able to take advantage of the new technology.

With AI at your disposal, all you have to do as the listener is decide on a style of music. Here are some ideas to get you started if you want a playlist for productivity.

[h/t Fast Company]

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