A Boy Named Brfxxccxxmnpcccc- lllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116

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Enacted in 1982, the Naming law in Sweden was originally created to prevent non-noble families from giving their children noble names, but a few changes to the law have been made since then. The part of the law referencing first names reads: “First names shall not be approved if they can cause offense or can be supposed to cause discomfort for the one using it, or names which for some obvious reason are not suitable as a first name.” If you later change your name, you must keep at least one of the names that you were originally given, and you can only change your name once.

“Brfxxccxxmnpcccclllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116” (pronounced Albin, naturally) was submitted by a child’s parents in protest of the Naming law. It was rejected. The parents later submitted “A” (also pronounced Albin) as the child’s name. It, too, was rejected.

Read More: 8 Countries With Fascinating Baby Naming Laws (2010)

January 14, 2012 - 5:25pm
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