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11 Stunning Cakes That Look Exactly Like Other Foods

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Sometimes there is more to a dinner plate than meets the eye. In some cases, what looks like a regular meal is actually a cake with some clever, camouflaging decoration. Here are 11 cakes that look like something much more nutritious... or at least like something different.

1. A Frosty Bucket of Beer

When cake decorator Rouvelee Ilagan decided to do something special for her father’s birthday cake, it’s doubtful she expected the hard-candy-laced design to land her in the pages of Woman’s Day, but that’s just what happened when she shared the pictures with the world. Well Rouvelee, now your cake landed you on mental_floss as well!

2. A Seafood Boil

When Flickr user schmish, who works at The Wicked Little Cake Company, wanted to make an impression at the Canadian Restaurant and Foodservices Show, she decided to show that the true focus of a cake isn't always the sweet treat inside, but often the way it looks on the outside as well.

3. Taco Bell Tacos

Laura LeClair Kelley’s son simply loves Taco Bell, but even those who can’t stand the mega-chain would probably love this dessert version. That’s because it features snickerdoodle taco shells, chocolate cake meat, dyed coconut lettuce, diced up Twizzlers tomatoes, thinly sliced Starburst cheese and melted marshmallow sour cream.

4. A Bundle of Asparagus

This might be the only cake on this list that makes more sense as a sweet than its intended decoration. After all, who on Earth could eat that much asparagus? Of course, when you hear the story behind the cake, it makes complete sense.

When Rosie of Sweetapolita decided to make a cake for her sister-in-law, Marie, who just won a bodybuilding competition, she decided to make light of Marie’s strict diet during her training regimen. As it turns out, the athlete was utterly sick of eating asparagus, so a giant bundle of the vegetable was a great reminder of just how hard she worked to win.

5. Spaghetti with Meatballs

Wild Cakes certainly lives up to its name with this sweet take on spaghetti and meatballs made with buttercream pasta, strawberry jam pasta sauce, Ferrero Rocher meatballs and shaved white chocolate parmesan.

6. Chicken and Waffles

The best groom’s cakes are designed specifically with the husband-to-be in mind. That’s why this chicken and waffles cake was so perfect for The Butter End customer Ryan, who loves this classic pairing of sweet and savory. Of course, in cake form, it’s all sweet, complete with real waffles and Rice Krispie fried chicken.

7. Sushi

Even those with an aversion to raw fish will probably love these delicious and fully-cooked sushi cupcakes made by Amanda Striepe. Apparently, the owner of the sushi restaurant where Amanda presented them to her friend was so impressed that he immediately asked her if she did catering.

8. A Chocolate-Covered Strawberry

If you believe that one good sweet deserves another, then you’ll probably love this chocolate-covered strawberry cake by Pink Cake Box. If the looks aren’t enough to get you, the chocolate cake with strawberry buttercream inside will.

9. Oreo Cookies

When you’re a cake-decorator by trade, it’s only natural for your friends and family members to try to challenge you when it comes to creating their own cakes. Of course, if Katrina of K’s Cake’s son wanted to stump her for his birthday cake, he’ll have to try harder, as the artist claims the hardest part of this design was trying to find an undamaged Oreo in the package for her to base her design on.

10. A Burger With Fries

Neatorama reader Alex sent the blog this great picture showing the delicious bacon burger birthday cake baked by his sister. If you don’t think the cake itself looks all that tasty, you might change your mind when you learn what all the layers were made from -the bacon is fruit leather, the sesame seeds are Rice Krispies, the patty is Oreo and chocolate cake and the bun is vanilla cake with caramel frosting. Yum!

11. A Steak With Carrots

Here’s a steak that looks way too raw to cut into. Fortunately, it's actually a fully baked cake created by Meredith Newcom for the Threadcakes competition, where bakers attempt to make delicious creations reminiscent of their favorite Threadless tees. In Miss Newcom’s case, the steak cake is actually her take on this Piece of Meat shirt.
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If all cakes looked this much like other foods, it seems likely that people would be a lot more suspicious of any massive dinners placed in front of them. Have any of you ever had a cake that looked like another food?

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Food
Let Alexa Help You Brine a Turkey This Thanksgiving
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There’s a reason most of us only cook turkey once a year: The bird is notoriously easy to overcook. You could rely on gravy and cranberry sauce to salvage your dried-out turkey this Thanksgiving, or you could follow cooking advice from the experts.

Brining a turkey is the best way to guarantee it retains its moisture after hours in the oven. The process is also time-consuming, so do yourself a favor this year and let Alexa be your sous chef.

“Morton Brine Time” is a new skill from the cloud-based home assistant. If you own an Amazon Echo you can download it for free by going online or by asking Alexa to enable it. Once it’s set up, start asking Alexa for brining tips and step-by-step recipes customized to the size of your turkey. Two recipes were developed by Richard Blais, the celebrity chef and restaurateur best known for his Top Chef win and Food Network appearances.

Whether you go for a wet brine (soaking your turkey in water, salt, sugar, and spices) or a dry one (just salt and spices), the process isn’t as intimidating as it sounds. And the knowledge that your bird will come out succulent and juicy will definitely take some stress out of the holiday.

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Big Questions
Why Do the Lions and Cowboys Always Play on Thanksgiving?
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Because it's tradition! But how did this tradition begin?

Every year since 1934, the Detroit Lions have taken the field for a Thanksgiving game, no matter how bad their record has been. It all goes back to when the Lions were still a fairly young franchise. The team started in 1929 in Portsmouth, Ohio, as the Spartans. Portsmouth, while surely a lovely town, wasn't quite big enough to support a pro team in the young NFL. Detroit radio station owner George A. Richards bought the Spartans and moved the team to Detroit in 1934.

Although Richards's new squad was a solid team, they were playing second fiddle in Detroit to the Hank Greenberg-led Tigers, who had gone 101-53 to win the 1934 American League Pennant. In the early weeks of the 1934 season, the biggest crowd the Lions could draw for a game was a relatively paltry 15,000. Desperate for a marketing trick to get Detroit excited about its fledgling football franchise, Richards hit on the idea of playing a game on Thanksgiving. Since Richards's WJR was one of the bigger radio stations in the country, he had considerable clout with his network and convinced NBC to broadcast a Thanksgiving game on 94 stations nationwide.

The move worked brilliantly. The undefeated Chicago Bears rolled into town as defending NFL champions, and since the Lions had only one loss, the winner of the first Thanksgiving game would take the NFL's Western Division. The Lions not only sold out their 26,000-seat stadium, they also had to turn fans away at the gate. Even though the juggernaut Bears won that game, the tradition took hold, and the Lions have been playing on Thanksgiving ever since.

This year, the Lions host the Minnesota Vikings.

HOW 'BOUT THEM COWBOYS?


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The Cowboys, too, jumped on the opportunity to play on Thanksgiving as an extra little bump for their popularity. When the chance to take the field on Thanksgiving arose in 1966, it might not have been a huge benefit for the Cowboys. Sure, the Lions had filled their stadium for their Thanksgiving games, but that was no assurance that Texans would warm to holiday football so quickly.

Cowboys general manager Tex Schramm, though, was something of a marketing genius; among his other achievements was the creation of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders.

Schramm saw the Thanksgiving Day game as a great way to get the team some national publicity even as it struggled under young head coach Tom Landry. Schramm signed the Cowboys up for the game even though the NFL was worried that the fans might just not show up—the league guaranteed the team a certain gate revenue in case nobody bought tickets. But the fans showed up in droves, and the team broke its attendance record as 80,259 crammed into the Cotton Bowl. The Cowboys beat the Cleveland Browns 26-14 that day, and a second Thanksgiving pigskin tradition caught hold. Since 1966, the Cowboys have missed having Thanksgiving games only twice.

Dallas will take on the Los Angeles Chargers on Thursday.

WHAT'S WITH THE NIGHT GAME?


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In 2006, because 6-plus hours of holiday football was not sufficient, the NFL added a third game to the Thanksgiving lineup. This game is not assigned to a specific franchise—this year, the Washington Redskins will welcome the New York Giants.

Re-running this 2008 article a few days before the games is our Thanksgiving tradition.

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