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11 Stunning Cakes That Look Exactly Like Other Foods

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Sometimes there is more to a dinner plate than meets the eye. In some cases, what looks like a regular meal is actually a cake with some clever, camouflaging decoration. Here are 11 cakes that look like something much more nutritious... or at least like something different.

1. A Frosty Bucket of Beer

When cake decorator Rouvelee Ilagan decided to do something special for her father’s birthday cake, it’s doubtful she expected the hard-candy-laced design to land her in the pages of Woman’s Day, but that’s just what happened when she shared the pictures with the world. Well Rouvelee, now your cake landed you on mental_floss as well!

2. A Seafood Boil

When Flickr user schmish, who works at The Wicked Little Cake Company, wanted to make an impression at the Canadian Restaurant and Foodservices Show, she decided to show that the true focus of a cake isn't always the sweet treat inside, but often the way it looks on the outside as well.

3. Taco Bell Tacos

Laura LeClair Kelley’s son simply loves Taco Bell, but even those who can’t stand the mega-chain would probably love this dessert version. That’s because it features snickerdoodle taco shells, chocolate cake meat, dyed coconut lettuce, diced up Twizzlers tomatoes, thinly sliced Starburst cheese and melted marshmallow sour cream.

4. A Bundle of Asparagus

This might be the only cake on this list that makes more sense as a sweet than its intended decoration. After all, who on Earth could eat that much asparagus? Of course, when you hear the story behind the cake, it makes complete sense.

When Rosie of Sweetapolita decided to make a cake for her sister-in-law, Marie, who just won a bodybuilding competition, she decided to make light of Marie’s strict diet during her training regimen. As it turns out, the athlete was utterly sick of eating asparagus, so a giant bundle of the vegetable was a great reminder of just how hard she worked to win.

5. Spaghetti with Meatballs

Wild Cakes certainly lives up to its name with this sweet take on spaghetti and meatballs made with buttercream pasta, strawberry jam pasta sauce, Ferrero Rocher meatballs and shaved white chocolate parmesan.

6. Chicken and Waffles

The best groom’s cakes are designed specifically with the husband-to-be in mind. That’s why this chicken and waffles cake was so perfect for The Butter End customer Ryan, who loves this classic pairing of sweet and savory. Of course, in cake form, it’s all sweet, complete with real waffles and Rice Krispie fried chicken.

7. Sushi

Even those with an aversion to raw fish will probably love these delicious and fully-cooked sushi cupcakes made by Amanda Striepe. Apparently, the owner of the sushi restaurant where Amanda presented them to her friend was so impressed that he immediately asked her if she did catering.

8. A Chocolate-Covered Strawberry

If you believe that one good sweet deserves another, then you’ll probably love this chocolate-covered strawberry cake by Pink Cake Box. If the looks aren’t enough to get you, the chocolate cake with strawberry buttercream inside will.

9. Oreo Cookies

When you’re a cake-decorator by trade, it’s only natural for your friends and family members to try to challenge you when it comes to creating their own cakes. Of course, if Katrina of K’s Cake’s son wanted to stump her for his birthday cake, he’ll have to try harder, as the artist claims the hardest part of this design was trying to find an undamaged Oreo in the package for her to base her design on.

10. A Burger With Fries

Neatorama reader Alex sent the blog this great picture showing the delicious bacon burger birthday cake baked by his sister. If you don’t think the cake itself looks all that tasty, you might change your mind when you learn what all the layers were made from -the bacon is fruit leather, the sesame seeds are Rice Krispies, the patty is Oreo and chocolate cake and the bun is vanilla cake with caramel frosting. Yum!

11. A Steak With Carrots

Here’s a steak that looks way too raw to cut into. Fortunately, it's actually a fully baked cake created by Meredith Newcom for the Threadcakes competition, where bakers attempt to make delicious creations reminiscent of their favorite Threadless tees. In Miss Newcom’s case, the steak cake is actually her take on this Piece of Meat shirt.
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If all cakes looked this much like other foods, it seems likely that people would be a lot more suspicious of any massive dinners placed in front of them. Have any of you ever had a cake that looked like another food?

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FRED TANNEAU/AFP/Getty Images
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Animals
Fisherman Catches Rare Blue Lobster, Donates It to Science
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FRED TANNEAU/AFP/Getty Images

Live lobsters caught off the New England coast are typically brown, olive-green, or gray—which is why one New Hampshire fisherman was stunned when he snagged a blue one in mid-July.

As The Independent reports, Greg Ward, from Rye, New Hampshire, discovered the unusual lobster while examining his catch near the New Hampshire-Maine border. Ward initially thought the pale crustacean was an albino lobster, which some experts estimate to be a one-in-100-million discovery. However, a closer inspection revealed that the lobster's hard shell was blue and cream.

"This one was not all the way white and not all the way blue," Ward told The Portsmouth Herald. "I've never seen anything like it."

While not as rare as an albino lobster, blue lobsters are still a famously elusive catch: It's said that the odds of their occurrence are an estimated one in two million, although nobody knows the exact numbers.

Instead of eating the blue lobster, Ward decided to donate it to the Seacoast Science Center in Rye. There, it will be studied and displayed in a lobster tank with other unusually colored critters, including a second blue lobster, a bright orange lobster, and a calico-spotted lobster.

[h/t The Telegraph]

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Courtesy Murdoch University
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Animals
Australian Scientists Discover First New Species of Sunfish in 125 Years
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Courtesy Murdoch University

Scientists have pinpointed a whole new species of the largest bony fish in the world, the massive sunfish, as we learned from Smithsonian magazine. It's the first new species of sunfish proposed in more than 125 years.

As the researchers report in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, the genetic differences between the newly named hoodwinker sunfish (Mola tecta) and its other sunfish brethren was confirmed by data on 27 different samples of the species collected over the course of three years. Since sunfish are so massive—the biggest can weigh as much as 5000 pounds—they pose a challenge to preserve and store, even for museums with large research collections. Lead author Marianne Nyegaard of Murdoch University in Australia traveled thousands of miles to find and collected genetic data on sunfish stranded on beaches. At one point, she was asked if she would be bringing her own crane to collect one.

Nyegaard also went back through scientific literature dating back to the 1500s, sorting through descriptions of sea monsters and mermen to see if any of the documentation sounded like observations of the hoodwinker. "We retraced the steps of early naturalists and taxonomists to understand how such a large fish could have evaded discovery all this time," she said in a press statement. "Overall, we felt science had been repeatedly tricked by this cheeky species, which is why we named it the 'hoodwinker.'"

Japanese researchers first detected genetic differences between previously known sunfish and a new, unknown species 10 years ago, and this confirms the existence of a whole different type from species like the Mola mola or Mola ramsayi.

Mola tecta looks a little different from other sunfish, with a more slender body. As it grows, it doesn't develop the protruding snout or bumps that other sunfish exhibit. Similarly to the others, though, it can reach a length of 8 feet or more. 

Based on the stomach contents of some of the specimens studied, the hoodwinker likely feeds on salps, a jellyfish-like creature that it probably chomps on (yes, sunfish have teeth) during deep dives. The species has been found near New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and southern Chile.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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