Lectures for a New Year: Being a Genius vs. Having a Genius

Welcome to the second day of our new lecture series. Are we having fun yet?

Up today, a short lecture you can definitely fit in during your lunch break. Liz Gilbert is best known for writing Eat, Pray, Love, which (unlike apparently ever other person in the country) I still haven't read. But she's someone who's been a reasonably successful writer for decades. When her breakthrough memoir became such a huge deal (10 million copies and counting...), Gilbert's perspective on her own creative process had to change: in all likeliness, her best work (or at least her best-known work) was behind her. How could she continue to write, knowing that, in essence, she could never "top" that book?

In this TED Talk (only twenty minutes long!), Gilbert discusses the challenges of surviving a creative career -- and not just a spectacularly successful one. She discusses historical notions of separating "inspiration" and "genius" into a separate source from the author/artist, so that creative people aren't burdened with complete responsibility for their success and failure. The talk is funny, frantic, and smart. You don't have to agree with her ideas (you may go on believing that writers really do generate ideas themselves), but Gilbert raises a series of provocative questions, not least of which: are we okay with many of our best creative minds drinking/drugging themselves to death?

Topics: creative careers, becoming successful, freaking out, history, authors who are alcoholic messes, concepts of "inspiration" from around the world, and: poems that thunder across the landscape.

Not covered: any specific material from EPL or her other books.

For: anyone involved in a creative pursuit; writers, artists, musicians -- creators of all kinds.

Viewing note: you can watch this lecture in HD by going to this TED page and clicking the Download button (below the video).

Further Reading

Fun fact: Gilbert's 1997 GQ piece "The Muse of the Coyote Ugly Saloon," chronicling her stint tending bar at the infamous saloon, was the basis for the popular movie Coyote Ugly. Crazy, right? Read the original article here. Obviously, Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia and its successor (briefly mentioned in the talk above), Committed: A Love Story are primary materials in any Gilbert study.

Transcript

An interactive transcript of Gilbert's talk is available from TED (click the "Interactive Transcript" in the upper right). The YouTube video also has good Closed Captions (hit the CC button to enable them). You can also get captions from the TED downloads (click the Download button and select the relevant options).

Suggest a Lecture

Got a favorite lecture? Is it online in some video format? Leave a comment and we’ll check it out!

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Nate D. Sanders Auctions
Sylvia Plath's Pulitzer Prize in Poetry Is Up for Auction
Nate D. Sanders Auctions
Nate D. Sanders Auctions

A Pulitzer Prize in Poetry that was awarded posthumously to Sylvia Plath in 1982 for her book The Collected Poems will be auctioned on June 28. The Los Angeles-based Nate D. Sanders Auctions says bidding for the literary document will start at $40,000.

The complete book of Plath’s poetry was published in 1981—18 years after her death—and was edited by her husband, fellow poet Ted Hughes. The Pulitzer Prize was presented to Hughes on Plath’s behalf, and one of two telegrams sent by Pulitzer President Michael Sovern to Hughes read, “We’ve just heard that the Collected Plath has won the Pulitzer Prize. Congratulations to you for making it possible.” The telegrams will also be included in the lot, in addition to an official congratulatory letter from Sovern.

The Pultizer’s jury report from 1982 called The Collected Poems an “extraordinary literary event.” It went on to write, “Plath won no major prizes in her lifetime, and most of her work has been posthumously published … The combination of metaphorical brilliance with an effortless formal structure makes this a striking volume.”

Ted Hughes penned an introduction to the poetry collection describing how Plath had “never scrapped any of her poetic efforts,” even if they weren’t all masterpieces. He wrote:

“Her attitude to her verse was artisan-like: if she couldn’t get a table out of the material, she was quite happy to get a chair, or even a toy. The end product for her was not so much a successful poem, as something that had temporarily exhausted her ingenuity. So this book contains not merely what verse she saved, but—after 1956—all she wrote.”

Also up for auction is Plath’s Massachusetts driver’s license from 1958, at which time she went by the name Sylvia P. Hughes. Bidding for the license will begin at $8000.

Plath's driver's license
Nate D. Sanders Auctions
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Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0
New 'Eye Language' Lets Paralyzed People Communicate More Easily
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0

The invention of sign language proved you don't need to vocalize to use complex language face to face. Now, a group of designers has shown that you don't even need control of your hands: Their new type of language for paralyzed people relies entirely on the eyes.

As AdAge reports, "Blink to Speak" was created by the design agency TBWA/India for the NeuroGen Brain & Spine Institute and the Asha Ek Hope Foundation. The language takes advantage of one of the few motor functions many paralyzed people have at their disposal: eye movement. Designers had a limited number of moves to work with—looking up, down, left, or right; closing one or both eyes—but they figured out how to use these building blocks to create a sophisticated way to get information across. The final product consists of eight alphabets and messages like "get doctor" and "entertainment" meant to facilitate communication between patients and caregivers.

Inside of a language book.
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

This isn't the only tool that allows paralyzed people to "speak" through facial movements, but unlike most other options currently available, Blink to Speak doesn't require any expensive technology. The project's potential impact on the lives of people with paralysis earned it the Health Grand Prix for Good at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity earlier in June.

The groups behind Blink to Speak have produced thousands of print copies of the language guide and have made it available online as an ebook. To learn the language yourself or share it with someone you know, you can download it for free here.

[h/t AdAge]

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