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Three More Coaches Who Lied About Their History

By now, you’ve probably heard the story of Yale football coach Tom Williams, who resigned this week for lying on his resume. He claimed to have been a Rhodes scholar candidate, and was even cited as a finalist during several stories about quarterback Patrick Witt’s Rhodes application. However, a New York Times investigation revealed that, while he was interested in the scholarship, he hadn’t even applied. He had also lied about being a member of the San Francisco 49ers on his resume.

Williams is far from the first coach to pad his resume a bit. Here are three more notable coaches who fibbed about anything from their academics to their age.

George O’Leary

George O’Leary’s tenure as head coach of Notre Dame was quite short-lived, lasting just five days. That’s how long it took school officials to discover that he had falsified many parts of his resume, including the fact that he had earned three letters playing football at the University of New Hampshire. In fact, he never even made it on the field (he had to sit out one season with mononucleosis). Worse, he claimed to have a master’s degree from NYU-Stony Brook, a school that doesn’t even exist. He had really attended SUNY-Stony Brook, but did not earn a degree.

When the information came out, O’Leary resigned, calling the lie “a selfish and thoughtless act many years ago.” A media investigation found that he had been listing the false information through several coaching stops, including as an assistant with Syracuse, defensive lines coach of the San Diego Chargers and as head coach of Georgia Tech. He made it through the controversy just fine – with an updated resume, he is currently the head coach at the University of Central Florida.

Marv Levy

When Marv Levy was first hired as head coach of the Buffalo Bills in 1986, he felt that his real age of 61 was too old, so he shaved a few years off and told everyone he was 58. Towards the end of his tenure, Levy switched his birth year back to the original 1925 in his official biography. When he was later hired back as general manager of the Bills in 2006, Levy spoke openly about his decision to come clean about the fib. “Maybe as I matured I came to realize it wasn’t a factor. It’s what you can do that counts,” he said.

Vince Lombardi

In their coverage of the Yale scandal, Deadspin pointed to a passage from a David Maraniss biography of Vince Lombardi that suggests that the legendary coach may have embellished his own history a bit. A New York Daily News profile of Lombardi – at the time an assistant coach for the Giants – discussed his history, starting with his birth in Brooklyn. From there, the article said, he played guard at Fordham, graduated after making Dean’s list for four years in a row, then spent two years at Fordham law school. However, Maraniss wrote that “the article by sportswriter Gene Ward had every fact wrong except where Lombardi was born.”

Nobody knows if Lombardi lied or Ward just got it wrong, but in reality Lombardi had dropped out of law school almost immediately. Nevertheless, it became part of his legend and several later profiles would credit him for law school or even a law degree.

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6 New Events Will Debut At This Year’s Winter Olympics in PyeongChang
Woohae Cho, Getty Images
Woohae Cho, Getty Images

It’s that time again! The 2018 Winter Olympic Games will kick off in PyeongChang, South Korea on February 9, and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) is adding a handful of new events to the festivities. In 2014, 12 new events—including Men’s and Women’s Ski Half-Pipe and Biathlon Mixed Relay—were added to make the Sochi Games more challenging and exciting. This year, six new events will make their debut in PyeongChang.

Here’s what’s new for 2018: While it started out as an X-Games event, extreme athletes will now get their chance to win gold medals in Men’s and Women’s Snowboard Big Air, which sees competitors performing their best spins and tricks after launching off a large (about 160 feet) ramp. For the first time, the Alpine skiing Nations Team Event will make its debut; the event features mixed teams of two men and two women going head-to-head in a series of downhill slalom races in a best-of-four competition.

Next up, Men’s and Women’s Speed Skating Mass Start features a maximum of 28 athletes in a 16-lap race, where all participants start at the same time with winner-takes-all stakes. Speed Skating Mass Start first appeared during the Lake Placid games in 1932, but has sat out the Winter Olympics in the 85 years since, so it's prepared to make a triumphant return.

Lastly, there's Curling Mixed Doubles. The new event consists of teams of two, a man and a woman, competing in a curling match with eight ends and five stones, instead of the traditional 10 and eight, respectively. In addition, there’s a 22-minute limit to get a team’s stones closest to the center button of the house.

The Opening Ceremony of the XXIII Olympic Winter Games will air on NBC beginning at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT on Friday, February 9, 2018.

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Watch These Surfers Crush Nantucket's 'Slurpee' Waves
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iStock

Instead of hunkering down with Netflix and hot chocolate during the East Coast’s recent cold snap, surfers Nick Hayden and Jamie Briard spent the first few days of January 2018 conquering icy waves in Nantucket, Massachusetts. The frothy swells resembled a frozen 7-Eleven Slurpee, so photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh, a friend of the athletes, grabbed his camera to capture the phenomenon, according to deMilked.

The freezing point for salt water is 28.4°F, but undulating ocean waves typically move too much for ice particles to form. At Nantucket’s Nobadeer Beach, however, conditions were just right for a thick layer of frost to form atop the water’s surface for several hours. Some of the slushy crests were even surfable before melting after about three hours, Nimerfroh told Live Science.

This is the second time Nimerfroh has photographed so-called “Slurpee waves." He captured a similar scene on February 27, 2015, telling The New York Times, “I saw these crazy half-frozen waves. Usually on a summer day you can hear the waves crashing, but it was absolutely silent. It was like I had earplugs in my ears.”

Check out Nimerfroh’s video of surfers enjoying the icy swell below.

[h/t deMilked]

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