CLOSE
Original image

12 Ways You Can Support Charities Without Donating Money

Original image

Regular readers might remember our post about helping penguins victimized by the Tauranga oil spill in New Zealand by knitting tiny sweaters. While we had a lot of interest in the article and the cause, it was only up a short time before a representative from the charity commented that they had received enough sweaters for all the needy penguins.

For all those flossers who still want to lend a hand, but don’t have the extra finances to donate cash to a worthy cause, there are plenty of others in need of your non-monetary support.

1. Little Hen Rescue

If you already bought all of your penguin sweater knitting supplies only to find out the birds were taken care of, don’t worry, other birds still need your help. The Little Hen Rescue is a UK charity dedicated to rescuing abandoned and abused chickens, many of which have lost their feathers due to stress and abuse. That’s where the need for chicken jumpers comes in. A pattern can be found on their site, along with the charity’s mailing address for your completed project.

Non-knitters can also get in on the fun with this one, as the group also provides a sewing pattern for fleece jumpers. No word yet on which one the hens prefer.

2. Leggings For Life



Leggings for Life is dedicated to helping deformed and paralyzed animals who are subject to ulcerations and infections from dragging their legs or walking in an adapted manner. As you may have guessed by their name, Leggings for Life helps these creatures by providing the animals with comfortable leggings that help prevent chaffing and rubbing.

The group, which helps a variety of different species, seems to aid creatures on a case by case basis, so patterns are presumably sent to volunteers as needed. They only maintain a small pool of volunteers at a time; right now they need a limited number of volunteers who are willing to ship their contributions out of the country. If you’d like to help, you can add the group on Facebook or email LeggingsForLife@att.net with the subject line “crocheter” or “sewer” and ask if they need any additional volunteers at this time.

3. The Snuggles Project

Most shelter animals are left in small cages with little warmth or comfort. The Snuggles Project works to give these animals security blankets that provide them with much needed comfort and warmth while the creatures wait to be adopted. Sewing, knitting, and crocheting patterns are available on their website, along with a list of shelters around the world that are accepting such donations.

4. Coats For Cubs



If you aren’t good at crafting, but happen to have some of your grandmother’s old fur coats, you can still help animals in need by donating the coats to a local wildlife rehabilitation center. Fur provides abandoned animals with a warm, safe place to curl up for a nap. For many young animals, it can help provide them the comfort they will be missing without their mother’s warmth. The Humane Society of the United States has a long list of wildlife rehabilitation centers that accept such donations on behalf of their animals. If you wish to donate to a local wildlife center not on their list, The Humane Society recommends calling in advance to ensure they accept such donations.

5. Friends of Pine Ridge Reservation

For those who prefer to help mankind, Friends of Pine Ridge Reservation (FoPRR) is a great place to start. This group is dedicated to helping shelters, clinics and other groups on the Pine Ridge Reservation of Sioux Native Americans. FoPRR is always looking for knitted, crocheted, and other sewn items for the people on the reservation; they are in particular need of clothing, toys, and duffel bags for the foster care children there.

6. Afghans for Afghans


It’s sadly ironic that many people of Afghanistan are in desperate need of the warmth provided by the very blankets that bear their name, but it’s the truth. Afghans for Afghans provides blankets and warm clothing to the people of Afghanistan who have been victimized by the turmoil of their country. Patterns, a mailing address, and more details can be found at their site.

7. The Painted Turtle



While it may sound like a group dedicated to painting animals, The Painted Turtle is actually a camp and family care center dedicated to children with debilitating conditions. If you want to help, the group is always accepting quilts and turtle pillows to make the kids feel more comfortable while away from home and to help them remember their time at camp. Details for quilt and afghan sizes can be found on their site, along with a pattern for the turtle pillows.

8. Chemocaps

If you’ve known someone who has gone through chemotherapy, you know just how upsetting the hair loss caused by the treatment can be. Chemocaps provides patients with hand-knitted head covers that not only provide warmth and comfort, but also remind cancer victims that they are not alone in their fight. Patterns and mailing addresses can be found at the group’s website.

9. Stitches From the Heart



If your heart goes out to premature babies and their parents, you might want to offer your support to Stitches From the Heart. They provide premature babies with blankets, booties, clothing, and hats since the tiny survivors often lack appropriately sized clothing when they are approved to leave the hospital. Volunteers are asked to refrain from using wool yarn and to ensure all items are washable. Knitting and crocheting patterns can be found on the site, along with appropriate sizing based on the baby’s weight.

10. Project Linus

As the name implies, Project Linus provides needy children with security blankets. Whether a child suffers from disease, trauma, or other need, a warm, cuddly blanket can provide them with the physical and mental comfort that they desperately need. Patterns are available on the group’s main website, but if you can’t sew, crochet, or knit, many local chapters are happy to accept any donations of unused blanket-making materials you may have lying around.

11. Nike Reuse-a-Shoe


Even if your shoes are too smelly and worn out to donate to Goodwill, you can still drop off your old sneakers at a Nike Reuse-a-Shoe center so they can be broken down and used to create materials for public playgrounds and tennis courts. While they can’t accept shoes with metal parts, dress shoes, or sandals, it’s still a great way to get rid of your stinky old tennis shoes without further crowding your local landfill.

12. Locks of Love and Wigs for Kids

Getting a major haircut any time soon? If you’re taking off more than ten inches, have your hair cut off while in a pony tail or braid and donate the trimmings to Locks of Love or Wigs for Kids. Your hair will be used to make a wig for a child who is suffering from hair loss for any variety of medical reasons. As a bonus, many salons offer discounts if you are donating your hair; Wigs for Kids has a list of such salons for those interested.

Even More Ways to Help


Even if you don’t want to leave the comforting glow of your computer, you can still help a variety of charities. Search using SearchKindly and money will be donated on your behalf to create libraries for under-served schools. Play educational games on Free Rice and every question you answer correctly will result in ten grains of rice being donated to the United Nations World Food Programme. Shop with Good Shop and a percentage of your sale will be given to a charity of your choosing. Lastly, you can read public domain books out loud while recording your voice and donate the recordings to LibriVox, where they will be made available to the public as free audio books.

If you prefer to act a little closer to home, there are always people that will need your help no matter where you live. You can knit clothing or blankets for your local homeless shelter (or give them to the people on the streets directly). You can donate blood to your local Red Cross. Lastly, you can always donate your time to a local charity in your area.

There are tons of noble non-profits out there and we’ve only scratched the surface here. That being said, if any of you Flossers happen to know any other worthy causes that can benefit from non-monetary support, feel free to leave more details in the comments.

For all you altruistic readers who intend to help one or more of these great charities, thank you for your generosity. The world could certainly use more people like you.

Original image
iStock
arrow
Animals
Los Angeles's Top Architects Design Pet Shelters to Benefit Homeless Cats
Original image
iStock

Los Angeles design firms Abramson Teiger Architects, d3architecture, and KnowHow Shop are known for producing some of the city's most distinct examples of architecture. But for this year’s “Giving Shelter” event in Culver City, local architects were tasked with designing structures on a much smaller scale than what they’re used to. Each piece auctioned off at the fundraiser was built with feline inhabitants in mind, and the proceeds from the night went to benefit homeless cats in the area.

L.A. is home to one of the largest stray cat populations in the country, with between 1 and 3 million cats living on the streets. Each year, architects involved with the group Architects for Animals design innovative shelters to raise money for FixNation, a nonprofit organization that spays and neuters the city's homeless cats. This year, the cat homes that were showcased included bird houses, AC vents, and a giant ball of yarn.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Anyone who’s familiar with Architects for Animals shouldn’t be surprised by the creativity of this year’s entries. Last year’s Giving Shelter event included a Brutalist interpretation of a classic tête-à-tête seat.

All images courtesy of MeghanBobPhotography / Architects for Animals

Original image
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
arrow
Big Questions
What Happens to the Losing Team's Pre-Printed Championship Shirts?
Original image
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Following a big win in the World Series, Super Bowl, NBA Finals, or any other major sporting event, fans want to get their hands on championship merchandise as quickly as possible. To meet this demand and cash in on the wallet-loosening "We’re #1" euphoria, manufacturers and retailers produce and stock two sets of T-shirts, hats and other merchandise that declare each team the champ.

Apparel for the winning team quickly fills clothing racks and gets tossed to players on the field. But what happens to the losing team's clothing?

Depending on the outcome of Game 7 Wednesday evening, boxes of shirts erroneously emblazoned with either the Houston Astros's or Los Angeles Dodgers's logos and "World Series Champions" proclamations are destined for charity. "We donate the product," Matt Bourne, vice president of business public relations for Major League Baseball, tells Mental Floss.

Donating to the disadvantaged is par for the course for most of the major sports leagues, although MLB briefly changed their policy up in 2016 and ordered the losing team's apparel destroyed after concerns it might find its way into the secondary market.

Bourne didn't elaborate on why MLB returned to its previous protocol, but it may have something to do with the sheer volume of usable clothing generated by having to anticipate two possible outcomes. Based on strong sales after the Chicago Bears’s 2007 NFC Championship win, for example, Sports Authority printed more than 15,000 shirts proclaiming a Bears Super Bowl victory well before the game even started. And then the Colts beat the Bears, 29-17. 

For almost two decades, an international humanitarian aid group called World Vision collected the unwanted items for MLB and NFL runners-up at its distribution center in Pittsburgh, then shipped them overseas to people living in disaster areas and impoverished nations. After losing Super Bowl XLIII in 2009, Arizona Cardinals gear was sent to children and families in El Salvador. In 2010, after the New Orleans Saints defeated Indianapolis, the Colts gear printed up for Super Bowl XLIV was sent to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

In 2011, after Pittsburgh lost to the Green Bay Packers, the Steelers Super Bowl apparel went to Zambia, Armenia, Nicaragua, and Romania.

Beginning in 2015, after 19 years with World Vision, the NFL started working with Good360. After New England defeated Seattle in Super Bowl XLIX, Seahawks gear was distributed in Azerbaijan and Georgia.

In 2016, Good360 chief marketing officer Shari Rudolph told Mental Floss that details about the products available for donation will be sent to Good360 about a week after the Super Bowl ends. They'll notify their nonprofit partners and determine who needs what. Beginning this year, Good360 will also handle the discarded MLB clothing.

"Once they request the product, it is shipped to a domestic location and stored within their facilities until they have enough product (through Good360 and other sources) to fill a container," Rudolph said. "Then it is shipped overseas and distributed to people in need."

Fans of the World Series team that comes up short can take heart: At least the spoils of losing will go to a worthy cause.

An earlier version of this story appeared in 2009. Additional reporting by Jake Rossen.

All images courtesy of World Vision, unless otherwise noted.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios