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11 Memorable Christmas Episodes (Including the Bewitched With Tabitha in Blackface)

Holiday episodes tend to be a bit generic. How many times can you rework A Christmas Carol or The Gift of the Magi into a sitcom plot? Here are a smattering of episodes worth mentioning either because they’re rare, different or just because we like them.

1. A Very Special Bewitched

Bewitched had many traditional Christmas episodes during its eight season run, but 1970's "Sisters at Heart" was controversial enough to require a special introduction by Elizabeth Montgomery at the behest of the show's sponsor, Oscar Mayer:

The plot that was making the network so jumpy was young Tabitha's desire to be sisters with her African-American friend, Lisa. In order to make them look alike, Tabby zaps black polka dots onto her flesh, and white ones on Lisa's. No doubt the episode would still be controversial today, thanks to Tabitha's brief appearance in blackface. The original story was submitted by a 10th grade English class at L.A.'s Thomas Jefferson High School.

2. Whoa, Jablonsky!

It's Christmas time at the Bundy house, which means Al is feeling more depressed than ever: "The stockings were hung round Dad's neck like a tie, along with a note that said 'Presents or Die.'"

As he plugs in a string of faulty lights he grumbles and wishes he'd never been born. Quicker than you can say "It's a Bundyful Life," guardian angel Sam Kinison pops in to show Al what his family would be like had he never existed. Married...with Children put an evil twist on the classic James Stewart film, revealing a universe in which Peggy cooked wholesome meals, Bud was a gracious young gentleman, and Kelly was a chaste college student. Al decides he wants to live after all... just to make sure his family stayed as miserable as they'd always made him.

3. "The Puppy Santa Brought Me Won't Wake Up!"

Many of us forget that December 25 is a regular work day for a lot of folks — nurses, fire fighters, police...and radio disc jockeys. Thus in the episode entitled "Miracle on Third or Fourth Street" we find Dr. Frasier Crane in the studio on Christmas day, taking calls from (as his disgruntled producer Roz predicted) the loneliest and most depressed people in the listening area. After his shift ends, Frasier (uncharacteristically dressed in old jeans and a torn sweatshirt) finds a diner that's open and treats himself to a turkey log with mashed potatoes. When he discovers that he's left his wallet at the station, his down-on-their-luck fellow diners — thinking he's homeless — pool their coins to pay for his dinner. Of course, Frasier is so touched by this "true meaning of Christmas" moment that he has to walk home in the snow rather than risk being seen climbing into his BMW.

4. The Draft Dodger

"The Draft Dodger" first aired in 1976, four years before President Jimmy Carter granted amnesty to those men who'd fled to Canada to avoid conscription into the military during the Vietnam War. David Brewster, a draft-dodging pal of the Meathead, has been living in Canada but decides to risk a visit to the U.S. in order to spend the holidays with his old friend (since his own father refuses to see him). Meanwhile, Archie has invited his old friend Pinky Peterson (whose only son died in Vietnam) for Christmas dinner. Mike and Gloria struggle to keep David's fugitive status a secret from Archie, but once it's revealed, it results in a heated debate. Archie, a World War II veteran who served his country when called, argues that no one wants to go to war and get killed, but a true American obeys his government. Pinky, on the other hand, believes that if his son was still alive he'd welcome David at the dinner table. A poignant and thought-provoking episode that in many ways is still relevant today.

5. I Guess I'll Lick My Lolly Later

"Don't Bring Your Guns to Town, Santa" was a departure for The Partridge Family; not only did it feature a lengthy fantasy sequence in which the actors played old-time Western characters, the youngest Partridges (Chris and Tracy) actually had several lines of dialog for a change! Reuben Kincaid was cast as Mean Sidney who stole the town's Christmas bell in the tale, and Danny was the heroic Little the Kid. David Cassidy, as Sheriff Swell, musically narrated the action to the tune of "The Ballad of High Noon." You can watch a 9-minute clip from the episode on YouTube.

6. Like Booze Ever Killed Anybody

There's always one show-off in the office who exceeds the dollar limit on the grab-bag exchange. (Of course, I was never the one who drew that gift; no, my donor always adhered down to the penny, which meant I got gifts like tiny soaps shaped like Santa Claus. A couple of showers later and Santa looked like a suppository. But I digress.) The gang at Dunder Mifflin (The Office) has organized a Secret Santa gift swap with a $20 price limit, but once they start opening presents at the party and see that they range from a video iPod to a hand-knitted oven mitt Michael insists they all play Yankee Swap. Since Michael has added verboten alcohol to the festivities (15 bottles of vodka for 20 people), you just know that things will end up less than jolly.

7. Don't Even Know How to Snow Proper Out Here

No, it's not politically correct to laugh at backwoods uneducated folks who have no knowledge of modern conveniences...but nevertheless there's something charming and heartwarming (and downright funny) about the Clampett family experiencing their very first Christmas in Beverly Hills. Try and not split a gut when Granny mistakes a TV set for a new fangled washing machine.

8. Modern Christmas

This episode of Green Acres provides a new twist on the "longing for an old-fashioned Christmas" trope. Oliver Wendell Douglas wants to celebrate the holiday as the American Farmer of yore—to go out with axe in hand and chop down his own tree, and to decorate it with popcorn from his own corn crib. Of course, nothing is ever that simple in Hooterville. First he finds out that there is a conservation law in effect that prohibits him from cutting down trees, even on his own property. Then he is unable to work up any outrage among his neighbors, who prefer the "modern" method of buying an artificial tree from Drucker's Store, complete with spruce spray squeezers, imitation sap oozers, strings of wax popcorn and fiberglas candy canes. (Watch it here.)

9. Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire

Even though it was actually the eighth episode produced, "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" was the first full-length episode of the series to air. It was broadcast on December 17, 1989 — interestingly enough, the same night of the previously mentioned Married...With Children Christmas classic — and it certainly set the tone for the rest of the series. It's Christmas time, and Bart decides that a "Mother" tattoo would delight and surprise his mom. Marge catches him in the tattoo parlor at the "Moth" stage and has to blow the family's entire Christmas present budget on a laser removal procedure. Homer's expected Christmas bonus doesn't come through, so he takes a job as a department store Santa to earn extra money. When Bart climbs in his lap, he utters "I'm Bart Simpson, who the hell are you?" for the first time. In a last-ditch attempt at raising cash, Homer goes to the dog track and bets on a long shot named Santa's Little Helper. The sluggish greyhound lost the race, but won a new home with the Simpson family.

10. "Three French hens!"

Nothing starts those visions of sugarplums dancing like Lou Grant barking "Three French hens!" And how many chances do we get to see Mary Tyler Moore sporting a World War I German spear-head helmet? Sue Ann Nivens, The Happy Homemaker, is taping her Christmas show ("Holiday Yummies from Worldwide Tummies") in early November. A sudden snowstorm has stranded the WJM newsroom staff, so Sue Ann enlists them to flesh out her dinner table. The only problem is that Murray, Ted, Lou and even gentle angelic Mary have been sniping at each other all day in a series of petty arguments and no one is in a festive mood.

11. Oh Boy, Cheddar Month!

How many times has a relative or co-worker surprised you with a brightly wrapped present after firmly agreeing "no gifts this year"? It happened to the FYI staff when Murphy Brown convinced them all to eschew the fruit baskets and cheeses of the world and to make a donation to charity instead. But, feeling guilty at the last minute, she ignored her own dictate and gave presents to all her co-workers. Her gesture sends the staff into a frenzied bout of last-minute shopping...at the drugstore, the only place open in Washington in the waning hours of Christmas Eve.

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Now is the time to vent your tired-of-shopping, why-can't-people-park-properly, if-I-hear-Santa-Claus-Is-Coming-To-Town-one-more-time-I'll-explode holiday spleens. What is your favorite Christmas episode of a TV show? Why do my choices stink? Let us hear it in the comments.

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9 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets of Hollywood Body Doubles
Hugh Jackman and his Real Steel body double, Taris Tyler
Hugh Jackman and his Real Steel body double, Taris Tyler
Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

When you see the back of an actor’s head in a movie, it may not be the actor you think it is. In addition to stunt performers, most movies employ body doubles (or photo doubles) with a passing resemblance to the principal actors. While some body doubles are brought on set for specific skills—like helping an actor pass as a professional athlete—the job can often involve just being a body, whether that means being nude on camera, having photogenic hands, or appearing in place of actors who can’t be on set for some reason. Here are nine secrets of the job:

1. THEY MIGHT ONLY BE MODELING ONE BODY PART.

Body double Danielle Sepulveres has played the hands of other actors in plenty of roles in her career, on TV and in beauty commercials featuring close-up shots of her holding moisturizer or makeup. She’s drizzled dressing on salad in place of Brooke Shields. She regularly slides files across tables, makes lists, and pours wine in the place of actresses on The Good Wife. (She has also played Jill Flint's butt on the show.) “I knew only glimpses of my hands might make it into a shot, or part of my shoulder along with a wisp of hair,” she wrote of one of her jobs in Good Housekeeping in 2016. But she overheard the director complaining that her wrists looked “vastly different” than those of the principal actress in the movie, 2015’s Mania Days. “Luckily, I didn't get fired in spite of my wrists, but I wouldn't have been surprised had it happened.”

2. THEY’RE NOT JUST THERE TO SHOW THEIR BUTTS.

Yes, body doubles are often brought in if an actor doesn’t want to bare it all on camera. But they are hired for other reasons, too. For one thing, union rules mandate the actors get 12 hours off between when they leave set for the day and their next call time, so if the shoots are running long, the crew might employ someone else to stand in. Other times, it's a matter of particular talents. Most actors may be able to sing, dance, and cry on camera, but few also have the athletic skills to allow them to pass as a sports legend. In Battle of the Sexes (2017), Emma Stone plays Billie Jean King, one of the best tennis players of all time. To realistically represent King’s skills on the court, the movie makers brought in tennis doubles to play in place of Stone and her co-star, Steve Carell. Stone’s double was chosen for her playing style, which resembled King’s, and worked with King on-set to perfect her imitation. The effort was, according to The Wall Street Journal, a huge success. “Not only is the tennis believable, it’s a meticulous representation of the type of tennis played in that era: serve and volley, chipping and charging to the net, touch volleys and soft hands.”

3. ACTORS CAN GET TOUCHY ABOUT WHO PLAYS THEM.

When you are tasked with choosing a celebrity doppelgänger, you’ve got to keep egos in mind. “The choice reflects on the principal actor,” DeeDee Ricketts, the casting director for Titanic, told Vanity Fair in 2016. “We have to take into consideration that they can’t be too thin, or more beautiful, or too heavy, or too old, or else the principal actor will think, That’s how they see me?” Actors often get to give input on who will be their double, and sometimes have final approval rights written into their contracts. When she was being considered for the job of Janet Leigh's body double in Psycho's iconic shower scene, model and Playboy covergirl Marli Renfro had to strip down for both Alfred Hitchcock and Leigh herself so that they could make sure her body looked enough like Leigh's, as Renfro recently revealed at a Brooklyn screening of the documentary 78/52: Hitchcock's Shower Scene. In the case of nude scenes, actors might even have final approval on what physical moves their doubles are allowed to make.

4. THEY MIGHT NEVER MEET THEIR DOUBLE ...

If you’re working as an actor’s double, by definition, you’re not going to have scenes with them, and so some body doubles never meet the stars they’re pretending to be. Danish actor Elvira Friis, who worked as a body double for Charlotte Gainsbourg (and her character’s younger self, played by Stacy Martin) during the racier scenes of Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac (2013), never met the actor. “The closest I got to Charlotte Gainsbourg was that I was wearing her dress,” Friis told The Wall Street Journal.

5. OR THEY MIGHT SPEND A LOT OF TIME WITH THE PEOPLE THEY'RE PORTRAYING.

But how much time an actor spends with their doppelgänger really depends on the role. Some actors spend plenty of time with their doubles on set helping them get into the role. In What Happened to Monday (2017), Noomi Rapace plays the roles of seven identical sisters, making body doubles a necessity on set. Rapace helped direct her doubles during filming, “as they needed to know how the star would play the scene for each character so that it would sync up when she performed the part herself,” according to The Hollywood Reporter. Game of Thrones star Lena Headey (who plays Cersei) worked closely with her double Rebecca Van Cleave for a nude scene in the show’s fifth season finale. Headey walked Van Cleave through her character’s thinking and movements for each shot. Then, Headey did the same performance herself, wearing a beige dress that could later be edited out. In the final product, Headey’s facial expressions were merged with Van Cleave’s nude body.

6. THEY DON’T ALWAYS LOOK EXACTLY LIKE THEIR COUNTERPARTS.

Because body doubles are often only seen from the back or side, they may not look quite as much like their acting counterpart as you’d think. Brett Baker, who worked as Leonardo DiCaprio’s body double for Titanic, is several inches shorter than DiCaprio and seven years older. From the front, you wouldn’t peg him as a Jack Dawson lookalike. But with the same clothes and haircut, shot from above and behind, he passed easily as DiCaprio. Once Leo’s closeups were done, according to Vanity Fair, Baker was often brought in to stand opposite Kate Winslet as she played through her half of the scene. In some cases, he didn’t make it into the final shot at all, but still had to be on set for those 14-hour days.

7. THESE DAYS, THEY GET A BOOST FROM CGI.

With the help of technology, filmmakers can put their leading actor’s face on a body double’s torso, so they don’t have to limit their body doubles to just back-of-the-head or partial shots. This allows them to seamlessly meld both the main actor and the body double’s performances in post-production. That can allow directors to get exactly the scene they want in shows like Orphan Black, which features Tatiana Maslany playing multiple roles, or in cases where actors don't want to get totally naked on-camera. In rare cases, it can also be used to bring actors back from the dead. When Paul Walker died in a car crash midway through filming Furious 7 (2015), the filmmakers used his brothers and another actor as body doubles, superimposing computer-generated images of Walker’s face on their performances. Around 260 shots featuring Walker’s doubles appeared in the final cut.

8. IF AN ACTOR CAN’T ALTER THEIR WEIGHT FOR A ROLE, A BODY DOUBLE CAN FILL IN.

When Matt Damon was filming The Martian (2015), he wanted to lose 30 to 40 pounds to portray astronaut Mark Watney after he had been surviving on meager rations for years. But the filming schedule made that impossible, so a body double had to be brought in for some shots. “I was going to lose a bunch of weight in the third act of the movie, then put the weight back on,” Damon told Maclean’s. However, as the schedule shook out, they filmed the NASA interiors in Hungary, then immediately went to Jordan, which doubled as the Red Planet for the film’s purposes, and shot all the exterior shots from the beginning, middle, and end of the movie, with no time for Damon to lose a significant amount of weight. The skinny body double isn’t on screen for long. “It was, like, two shots,” Damon describes. (Still, fans noticed.)

9. SOMETIMES THEY NEVER MAKE IT IN FRONT OF THE CAMERA AT ALL.

When it comes to nude scenes, sometimes body doubles are hired but never used. Veteran body double Laura Grady was cast as Robin Wright’s lookalike for State of Play (2009), but didn’t shoot a single scene. “I just sat in my trailer, ready to go, and then at the end, [Wright] decided to do her own scenes,” Grady told Vulture in 2014. “That happens sometimes. Sometimes they just get a body double because they think they might need one, and then all of a sudden the actress is comfortable and she’s like, ‘No, I’ll just do it.’ Or they change a scene and they don’t make it as risqué.” Don’t worry, though—the double still gets paid.

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Bob Ross’s Happy Little Menagerie Is Getting the Funko Treatment, Too
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Back in August, the pop culture-loving toy fiends at Funko introduced a happy little Pop! Vinyl figurine of beloved painter/television icon Bob Ross, decked out in his trademark jeans and button-down shirt with a painter’s palette in his hand and his legendary perm (which he hated) atop his tiny little vinyl head. This Joy of Painting-themed addition to the Funko lineup proved to be an instant hit, so the company added a couple of additional toys to its roster—this time incorporating members of Ross’s happy little menagerie of pets, who were almost as integral to the long-running series as the painter himself.


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If you’re looking to score one of these toys before Christmas, it’s going to have to be a limited edition one—and it’s going to cost you. In collaboration with Target, Funko paired Ross with his favorite pocket squirrel, Pea Pod, which will set you back about $40. For just a few dollars more, you can opt to have the happy accident-prone painter come with Hoot the owl.


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On Friday, December 8, the company will release a Funko two-pack that includes Ross with a paintbrush and Ross with an adorable little raccoon.


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If you’d prefer to save a few dollars, and are willing to wait out the holiday season, you can pre-order Ross with just the raccoon for delivery around December 29.

So many happy little options, so little time.

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