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50 Fun Examples of Louis C.K. Fan Art

Louis C.K. is one of the Internet's (and maybe America's) most loved comedians. If you've never seen his Emmy-nominated TV show or stand-up specials, you can get to know him here, through the wonderful and sometimes odd artwork of his fans.

Left: Tim Goodier at tacobelltwoways
Right: Cara Thayer & Louie Van Patten at etsy


cryingatbingo (Emily) at Flickr



Joan Varitek at pinkopigtails



Josh Lange at Dallas Observer



Left: thewalkingman at deviantART
Right: dresslikeshit at deviantART



Cara Mae Corder on tumblr


Left: Mike Burns at Mike Burns Illustration
Right: Tim Jepson at Art by Tim Jepson


BlackPotion (Ana T.) at deviantART



Left: Kerry Daniszewski at Kerda
Right: uhhhsirk (Hayden) at deviantART



William Appledorn at The Art of William Appledorn



Rendez Pagett at Picture Engineering



Left: borosaur (Boris) at deviantART
Right: wopah at deviantART



Tom Trager on tumblr



Left: Andy Hunt at society6
Right: Greg Hill at gh illustration


Kid-With-The-Hat at deviantART



GH Illustration (G Haskell) at etsy



Left: TheRogueSPiDER (Jason A. Santiago) at deviantART
Right: Rene A. Garza III at Non-Habit Forming



Monk Design (Matt Jacobus) on tumblr


SuperMachoMao at Flickr



Left: Eric Escobar on Blogger
Right: R.L. Amaro at indie8graphics



Mike Holmes at Flickr



Gant Powell at Hire an Illustrator



bx21 (B. Yu) at deviantART



bonvillain (Thomas Bonvillain) at deviantART



vegas9879 (Tyler Smith) at deviantART


Josh Lange at Chalk Outlines


Karthik Abhiram at deviantART



ralph0 at deviantART



Left: Michael Maglio at Soap in the Eye
Right: filmfanatic88 (Nick Bachan) at Flickr



patchco89 (Patrick Coppolino) at Flickr



Jeffrey Decoster at JeffreyDecoster.com



HanzSolo (Fabián Peña Loyola) at deviantART



demann18 (Dezmond Gipson) at deviantART



Franklin P. Quacker at Quackers


Rektozhan (Ray Rubeque) at deviantART



plantains? (Mike Lees) at Flickr



TheOriginalMimeShit (Cody Ozkenel) at deviantART



Jeff Proctor at Make Nonsense



Douglas Harrower at society6



The Mangusta at etsy



weja at deviantART

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Dan Bell
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Design
A Cartographer Is Mapping All of the UK’s National Parks, J.R.R. Tolkien-Style
Peak District National Park
Peak District National Park
Dan Bell

Cartographer Dan Bell makes national parks into fantasy lands. Bell, who lives near Lake District National Park in England, is currently on a mission to draw every national park in the UK in the style of the maps in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Kottke.org reports.

The project began in September 2017, when Bell posted his own hand-drawn version of a Middle Earth map online. He received such a positive response that he decided to apply the fantasy style to real world locations. He has completed 11 out of the UK’s 15 parks so far. Once he finishes, he hopes to tackle the U.S. National Park system, too. (He already has Yellowstone National Park down.)

Bell has done various other maps in the same style, including ones for London and Game of Thrones’s Westeros, and he commissions, in case you have your own special locale that could use the Tolkien treatment. Check out a few of his park maps below.

A close-up of a map for Peak District National Park
Peak District National Park in central England
Dan Bell

A black-and-white illustration of Cairngorms National Park in the style of a 'Lord of the Rings' map.
Cairngorms National Park in Scotland
Dan Bell

A black-and-white illustration of Lake District National Park in the style of a 'Lord of the Rings' map.
Lake District National Park in England
Dan Bell

You can buy prints of the maps here.

[h/t Kottke.org]

All images by Dan Bell

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iStock
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Art
The Simple Optical Illusion That Makes an Image Look Like It's Drawing Itself
iStock
iStock

Artist James Nolan Gandy invents robot arms that sketch intricate mathematical shapes with pen and paper. When viewed in real time, the effect is impressive. But it becomes even more so when the videos are sped up in a timelapse. If you look closely in the video below, the illustration appears to materialize faster than the robot can put the design to paper. Gizmodo recently explained how the illusion works to make it look like parts of the sketch are forming before the machine has time to draw them.

The optical illusion isn’t an example of tricky image editing: It’s the result of something called the wagon wheel effect. You can observe this in a car wheel accelerating down the highway or in propeller blades lifting up a helicopter. If an object makes enough rotations per second, it can appear to slow down, move backwards, or even stand still.

This is especially apparent on film. Every “moving image” we see on a screen is an illusion caused by the brain filling in the gaps between a sequence of still images. In the case of the timelapse video below, the camera captured the right amount of images, in the right order, to depict the pen as moving more slowly than it did in real life. But unlike the pen, the drawing formed throughout the video isn't subject to the wagon-wheel effect, so it still appears to move at full speed. This difference makes it look like the sketch is drawing itself, no pen required.

Gandy frequently shares behind-the-scenes videos of his mechanical art on his Instagram page. You can check out some of his non-timelapse clips like the one below to better understand how his machines work, then visit his website to browse and purchase the art made by his 'bots.

And if you think his stuff is impressive, make sure to explore some of the incredible art robots have made in the past.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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