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11 Visual Clichés You Never See in Real Life

A Christmas tree on the lot with a wooden X-stand affixed to the bottom. Armored car guards loading sacks marked with giant dollar signs. There are some things that, it seems, are stereotypical images constantly used in movies, comic strips, and on TV, but just never happen in real life. For example, have you ever actually seen any of these?

1. A Boy Scout Helping a Little Old Lady Cross the Street

It's the ultimate cliché when describing the friendly and courteous Boy Scout, but have you ever really seen such a youngster in uniform aiding an elderly person at a crosswalk?

It's possible that this association came about as a result of the repeated re-telling of a true story that occurred in 1909. William Boyce, an American businessman, got lost in the foggy London streets during a visit to England, and a Scout approached him and guided him to his destination. When Boyce offered the youth a tip, the Scout declined, stating that he could not accept money for a good deed.

2. A Reporter with a "Press" Card in his Hatband

True, very few reporters wear fedoras these days, but even in the dress-up days of the 1930s and '40s, did real-life newspaper folks ever display a tiny PRESS placard on their hats?

Despite the old movies that show police giving Melvyn Douglas or Clark Gable access to a crime scene by virtue of the card in their hatband, real-life reporters of that era did not flaunt their status. If, for example, their paper had recently been critical of local government then law enforcement officials would not be so eager to give them special treatment.

3. A Person Drinking Liquor from a Jug Marked "XXX"

This cliché most likely developed from an artist's immediate need to emphasize that that's not imported mineral water the "hillbilly" in the scene is swigging. Let's face it, what bootlegger with half a brain is going to mark his jugs with such an open invitation to revenuers?

4. An Angry Wife Chasing Her Husband with a Rolling Pin

Domestic violence is no joke, obviously, but have you ever seen an episode of COPS in which the battered and bleeding husband states, "My wife... she hit me with a rolling pin...!"?

5. Two Men Assuming the "Put Up Your Dukes" Stance Prior to a Fight

We're not talking professional boxing, we mean two guys who start out trading verbal barbs with one another and then let their tempers escalate. As a rule, when men get enraged to the point of fisticuffs, do they actually take the time to crouch down, pose, and circle around or do they just start punching?

6. A Newspaper Boy Yelling "Extra! Extra! Read All About It!"

It was the de facto transitioning device used in hundreds of old movies, but have you really seen a kid in knee breeches hawking papers by yelling "Extra!"?

TV would have us believe that these enterprising newsies spread information as quickly as the Internet does today, seeing as the cry of "Read all about it!" was always heard mere seconds after a major event (like the bombing of Pearl Harbor) occurred.

7. A Classmate Being Punished by Wearing a Dunce Cap

Even back in my elementary school days – when errant students could still get "the paddle" without fear of the teacher being sued – I never saw any miscreant forced to wear a pointy hat.

8. A Police Officer Shouting "Calling All Cars" into His Radio

Many movies and TV shows up until the 1950s have emphasized the urgency of a crime situation by a cop calling "calling all cars, calling all cars..." into his car radio. Did an actual cop on the beat have the ability to make such a call?

Probably not. The very first police car two-way radios were installed in Bayonne, New Jersey, in 1933, and relied on a central dispatcher to make district-wide "broadcasts." The 10-code (as in, "10-4" or "We've got a 10-33") originated in 1937, not only to reduce the use of speech on radio and save time, but also as a way to describe a particular situation without alarming those bystanders within earshot.

9. An Organ Grinder with a Monkey

Any time a movie or TV show wants to portray an old-timey ethnic neighborhood, nothing sets the tone better than an organ grinder (preferably a stereotypically Italian man) with a trained monkey collecting coins from bystanders.

Even though celluloid organ grinders are usually shown surrounded by a happy and appreciative audience, in real life hurdy-gurdy men earned money by being annoying, not entertaining. Their music box played the same snog song over and over and the only way to make them move along was by giving them a coin.

10. A Burglar Wearing a Lone Ranger Mask

This type of concealment is technically called a "domino" mask, from the Latin dominus (meaning "lord or "master," but not "Kemo Sabe").

11. A Goat Eating a Tin Can

Forget pigs, when a cartoon or comic strip wants to depict the ultimate omnivore, the goat is their go-to animal. And as a demonstration of their gluttony, they are usually shown munching on an old tin can.

Once upon a time a real-life goat might have occasionally been observed licking a discarded can, but that was because it liked the taste of the paste that was used to affix labels to cans back in the very old days. Goats are actually quite finicky about what they'll consume, though they do "mouth" objects to get a feel for them and to determine whether they are edible.
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What visual clichés would you add to the list?

Note: We're taking a dinner break but will be back starting at 9:11pm with three more 11 lists.

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Yes, You Can Put Your Christmas Decorations Up Now—and Should, According to Psychologists
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We all know at least one of those people who's already placing an angel on top of his or her Christmas tree while everyone else on the block still has paper ghosts stuck to their windows and a rotting pumpkin on the stoop. Maybe it’s your neighbor; maybe it’s you. Jolliness aside, these early decorators tend to get a bad rap. For some people, the holidays provide more stress than splendor, so the sight of that first plastic reindeer on a neighbor's roof isn't exactly a welcome one.

But according to two psychoanalysts, these eager decorators aren’t eccentric—they’re simply happier. Psychoanalyst Steve McKeown told UNILAD:

“Although there could be a number of symptomatic reasons why someone would want to obsessively put up decorations early, most commonly for nostalgic reasons either to relive the magic or to compensate for past neglect.

In a world full of stress and anxiety people like to associate to things that make them happy and Christmas decorations evoke those strong feelings of the childhood.

Decorations are simply an anchor or pathway to those old childhood magical emotions of excitement. So putting up those Christmas decorations early extend the excitement!”

Amy Morin, another psychoanalyst, linked Christmas decorations with the pleasures of childhood, telling the site: “The holiday season stirs up a sense of nostalgia. Nostalgia helps link people to their personal past and it helps people understand their identity. For many, putting up Christmas decorations early is a way for them to reconnect with their childhoods.”

She also explained that these nostalgic memories can help remind people of spending the holidays with loved ones who have since passed away. As Morin remarked, “Decorating early may help them feel more connected with that individual.”

And that neighbor of yours who has already been decorated since Halloween? Well, according to a study in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, homes that have been warmly decorated for the holidays make the residents appear more “friendly and cohesive” compared to non-decorated homes when observed by strangers. Basically, a little wreath can go a long way.

So if you want to hang those stockings before you’ve digested your Thanksgiving dinner, go ahead. You might just find yourself happier for it.

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11 Black Friday Purchases That Aren't Always The Best Deal
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Black Friday can bring out some of the best deals of the year (along with the worst in-store behavior), but that doesn't mean every advertised price is worth splurging on. While many shoppers are eager to save a few dollars and kickstart the holiday shopping season, some purchases are better left waiting for at least a few weeks (or longer).

1. FURNITURE

Display of outdoor furniture.
Photo by Isaac Benhesed on Unsplash

Black Friday is often the best time to scope out deals on large purchases—except for furniture. That's because newer furniture models and styles often appear in showrooms in February. According to Kurt Knutsson, a consumer technology expert, the best furniture deals can be found in January, and later on in July and August. If you're aiming for outdoor patio sets, expect to find knockout prices when outdoor furniture is discounted and put on clearance closer to Labor Day.

2. TOOLS

A display of tools.
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Unless you're shopping for a specific tool as a Christmas gift, it's often better to wait until warmer weather rolls around to catch great deals. While some big-name brands offer Black Friday discounts, the best tool deals roll around in late spring and early summer, just in time for Memorial Day and Father's Day.

3. BEDDING AND LINENS

A stack of bed linens.
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Sheet and bedding sets are often used as doorbuster items for Black Friday sales, but that doesn't mean you should splurge now. Instead, wait for annual linen sales—called white sales—to pop up after New Year's. Back in January of 1878, department store operator John Wanamaker held the first white sale as a way to push bedding inventory out of his stores. Since then, retailers have offered these top-of-the-year sales and January remains the best time to buy sheets, comforters, and other cozy bed linens.

4. HOLIDAY DÉCOR

Rows of holiday gnomes.
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If you are planning to snag a new Christmas tree, lights, or other festive décor, it's likely worth making due with what you have and snapping up new items after December 25. After the holidays, retailers are looking to quickly move out holiday items to make way for spring inventory, so ornaments, trees, yard inflatables, and other items often drastically drop in price, offering better deals than before the holidays. If you truly can't wait, the better option is shopping as close to Christmas as possible, when stores try to reduce their Christmas stock before resorting to clearance prices.

5. TOYS

Child choosing a toy car.
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Unless you're shopping for a very specific gift that's likely to sell out before the holidays, Black Friday toy deals often aren't the best time to fill your cart at toy stores. Stores often begin dropping toy prices two weeks before Christmas, meaning there's nothing wrong with saving all your shopping (and gift wrapping) until the last minute.

6. ENGAGEMENT RINGS AND JEWELRY

Rows of rings.
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Holiday jewelry commercials can be pretty persuasive when it comes to giving diamonds and gold as gifts. But, savvy shoppers can often get the best deals on baubles come spring and summer—prices tend to be at their highest between Christmas and Valentine's Day thanks to engagements and holiday gift-giving. But come March, prices begin to drop through the end of summer as jewelers see fewer purchases, making it worth passing up Black Friday deals.

7. PLANE TICKETS AND TRAVEL PACKAGES

Searching for flights online.
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While it's worth looking at plane ticket deals on Black Friday, it's not always the best idea to whip out your credit card. Despite some sales, the best time to purchase a flight is still between three weeks and three and a half months out. Some hotel sites will offer big deals after Thanksgiving and on Cyber Monday, but it doesn't mean you should spring for next year's vacation just yet. The best travel and accommodation deals often pop up in January and February when travel numbers are down.

8. FOOD AND SNACK BASKETS

Gift basket against a blue background.
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Fancy fruit, meat and cheese, and snack baskets are easy gifts for friends and family (or yourself, let's be honest), but they shouldn't be snagged on Black Friday. And because baskets are jam-packed full of perishables, you likely won't want to buy them a month away from the big day anyway. But traditionally, you'll spend less cheddar if you wait to make those purchases in December.

9. WINTER CLOTHING

Rack of women's winter clothing.
Photo by Hannah Morgan on Unsplash.

Buying clothing out of season is usually a big money saver, and winter clothes are no exception. Although some brands push big discounts online and in-store, the best savings on coats, gloves, and other winter accessories can still be found right before Black Friday—pre-Thanksgiving apparel markdowns can hit nearly 30 percent off—and after the holidays.

10. SMARTPHONES

Group of hands holding smartphones.
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While blowout tech sales are often reserved for Cyber Monday, retailers will try to pull you in-store with big electronics discounts on Black Friday. But, not all of them are really the best deals. The price for new iPhones, for example, may not budge much (if at all) the day after Thanksgiving. If you're in the market for a new phone, the best option might be waiting at least a few more weeks as prices on older models drop. Or, you can wait for bundle deals that crop up during December, where you pay standard retail price but receive free accessories or gift cards along with your new phone.

11. KITCHEN GADGETS

Row of hanging kitchen knives and utensils.
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Black Friday is a great shopping day for cooking enthusiasts—at least for those who are picky about their kitchen appliances. Name-brand tools and appliances often see good sales, since stores drop prices upwards of 40 to 50 percent to move through more inventory. But that doesn't mean all slow cookers, coffee makers, and utensil prices are the best deals. Many stores advertise no-name kitchen items that are often cheaply made and cheaply priced. Purchasing these lower-grade items can be a waste of money, even on Black Friday, since chances are you may be stuck looking for a replacement next year. And while shoppers love to find deals, the whole point of America's unofficial shopping holiday is to save money on products you truly want (and love).

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