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11 Awesome Outdoor and Interactive Ads

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While no one is really sure how many ads a person sees each day, our landscape and media are becoming ever more cluttered with advertisements, from product placement in television shows to traditional billboards. Brands have been forced to become more creative (or intrusive) than ever in an attempt to draw consumers' attention. As a result, interactive ads are increasingly popular. We've rounded up 11 of our favorites.

1. Sign Swing

Cramer-Krasselt for COA Youth & Family Centers, via Ads of the World

2. Bring the Billboard to Life

lg2 for Agence de Santé de Quebec (ASSS), via Ads of the World

3. Magazine Cleavage


via adverbox

4. Meat-Scented Purina Posters


Ogilvy for Purina Bark in the Park, via Ads of the World

5. "Slower is Better" Radar Signs


Cramer-Krasselt for Elm Grove Police Department, via The Inspiration Room

6. Plug 'n' Play Posters

JWT for 91ROCK FM, via TheErhanturan

7. Forced Warm-Ups


Ogilvy for Leif Wellness Club, via Ads of the World

8. Rewards in the Stars

BBDO for Starbucks, via The Media Merchants

9. Run for UNICEF


BBDO for Nike and UNICEF, via I'm With The Brand

10. Dollar Drinks Ice Sculpture

Cossette for McDonald's, via Ads of the World

11. Bus Stop Mini Ramp


Saatchi & Saatchi for Quiksilver, via fubiz

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iStock
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Food
The Surprising Reason Why Wendy's Serves Fast Food's Only Baked Potato
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iStock

For an industry that prides itself on convenience and indulgence, a fiber-rich pseudo-vegetable that’s hard to eat on the go and isn’t deep-fried seems like a curious addition to a fast food menu. Yet Wendy’s has been selling baked potatoes for nearly three decades—11-and-a-half ounces of pure, unpeeled spud, drowned in your choice of toppings.

According to Thrillist writer Wil Fulton, who spoke with Wendy’s vice president of culinary innovation Lori Estrada, the chain first got turned on to the foil-wrapped food in the 1980s, when nutrition experts were (erroneously) touting low-fat diets for weight loss. Eager to embrace the trend, Wendy's viewed a plain potato as a popular alternative to sliced, oil-slicked fries.

The hysteria over fat may have disappeared, but the collective consumer appetite for the potato did not. Estrada says she believes many of them consider the 270-to-480 calorie (depending on toppings) carb dump a meal unto itself, and that some enjoy piling on cheese, bacon, and other burger trimmings for a tasty and inexpensive dinner.

So why don’t you see baked potatoes at other franchises? Estrada speculates that the logistical issues are a turnoff. The potatoes are cooked from a raw state in convection ovens, which could necessitate new equipment and ample prep time. With fries still the king of sides, franchisees may not think it’s worth the hassle.

Wendy’s is undoubtedly happy to have the market to themselves: The chain sells 1 million tubers a week.

[h/t Thrillist]

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LaCroix
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Food
The Secret Ingredient That Makes LaCroix Water So Irresistible
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LaCroix

The distinctive Technicolor cans of LaCroix sparkling water are an increasingly popular sight in stores and on kitchen tables around the country. (If you're old enough to remember the Snapple phenomenon of the 1990s, this is like that—just bubbly.) But as The Wall Street Journal recently pointed out, few of the beverage's loyal fans have any idea what it is they're drinking.

LaCroix comes in a variety of flavors, from tangerine to coconut. The can label, however, is cryptic, listing "natural flavors" as part of the ingredients. Their website discloses only that "natural essence oils" are involved, which sounds like LaCroix should be applied to your hair and then rinsed off.

A look at the nutritional information for LaCroix water
LaCroix

As it turns out, that's not too far off. According to The Wall Street Journal, these "essences" are naturally produced chemicals that are manufactured by heating up fruit or vegetable remnants until they make a vapor, then condensing them into a clear concentrate. They're used in a variety of consumer products, from shampoos to ice pops.

LaCroix was unwilling to confirm the Journal's claim, protecting their manufacturing process in a manner similar to Coca-Cola's famously secretive treatment of their recipe. They do state that no sugars are added, but that may not be enough to protect your teeth: Carbonated water and citric acids can combine to create a lower pH, which has a detrimental effect on tooth enamel. Like most everything that tastes good, these flavored waters are best enjoyed in moderation.

[h/t The Wall Street Journal]

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