Morning Cup of Links: Flying Appliances

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department is taking a new look into the case of actress Natalie Wood's death. A new book has some information that should have been disclosed 30 years ago -if it's true.
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An award-winning hack puts YouTube videos on the front of your microwave. They're not only for entertainment; the videos are selected to be the exact length you must wait for your hot ramen.
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The man who made things fly. Like washing machines and lawnmowers and ...suddenly I feel my life has been wasted.
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Staggeringly Tall and Mind-Blowingly Old. I used to date a guy like that, but we're supposed to be talking about magnificent trees.
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Magnetism, electricity, traffic, cell phones, pesticides, and other features of modern living may have serious effects on babies in the womb. If that's not depressing enough, antidepressants can also cause problems.
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The people in charge of getting the stadium ready should remember how big football players are. Terrell Brown is 377 pounds, which is no match for this flimsy chair.
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If The Lord of the Rings had been made in 1944, I might have starred Humphrey Bogart, and might have looked something like this. Peter Lorre makes a pretty good Gollum.
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Every week, we wonder which is the principle characters in The Walking Dead will end up as zombies. Here's a look at their possible fates.
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Retirement may become a thing of the past as people work into their elderly years. Some like to work, but others just can't afford to quit.
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Five Other Thanksgiving Holidays. Gratitude is the theme, not the turkey and football.

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College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
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One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

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North America: East or West Coast?
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