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The All-Time Most Popular Posts From 21 Wonderful Websites

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While poking around in Google Analytics the other day, I was a little surprised to learn this was our all-time most popular story. I thought it was this. Or maybe this. So we decided to call people at various websites and ask everyone the same question — what was your #1 all-time most-clicked-on post? Here's what they told us.

1. Boing Boing — Classic Arcade Game Deaths

Directed by Rob Beschizza, this video has been viewed over 1.2 million times. I recommend watching it, then letting the music — a MIDI version of "Mad World" — play in the background the rest of the week.

Link: Classic Arcade Game Deaths (Boing Boing Video)

2. The Week — Why Do Smart Kids Grow Up to Be Heavier Drinkers?

Francesco83 / Shutterstock.com

Two studies suggested a correlation between intelligence and a thirst for alcohol. The good people at our sister site The Week examined the connection.

Link: Why Do Smart Kids Grow Up to Be Heavier Drinkers?

3. Flavorwire — The 30 Harshest Musician-on-Musician Insults

Flavorwire followed up their popular lists of author-on-author and filmmaker-on-filmmaker insults with a look at music feuds. Like this Elton John zinger about Keith Richards: “It’s like a monkey with arthritis, trying to go onstage and look young.”

Link: The 30 Harshest Musician-on-Musician Insults

4. Lifehacker — Turn Your $60 Router into a $600 Router

This is one of at two posts in Lifehacker's 3 Million Pageviews Club. "How to Crack a Wi-Fi Network’s WEP Password" is the other.

Link: Turn Your $60 Router into a $600 Router

5. LIFE.com — 30 Dumb Inventions

Reg Speller/

Society made some great strides in the early 20th century. These inventions weren't among them.

Link: 30 Dumb Inventions

6. Neatorama — The 10 Most Magnificent Trees in the World

Image credit: Vladi22

A little tree porn from our friends at Neatorama.

Link: The 10 Most Magnificent Trees in the World

7. The Awl — Inside David Foster Wallace's Private Self-Help Library

"There are indications — particularly in the markings of his books — of Wallace's own ideas about the sources of his depression, some of which seem as though they ought to be the privileged communications of a priest or a psychiatrist. But these things are in a public archive and are therefore going to be discussed and so I will tell you about them."

Link: Inside David Foster Wallace's Private Self-Help Library

8. Geeks Are Sexy — The Geek Alphabet

Z is for Zork, indeed. That makes me so happy.

Link: The Geek Alphabet

9. BuzzFeed — The 24 Best Chat Roulette Screenshots

The photo above is from the sequel, 30 More Great Chat Roulette Screenshots.

Link: The 24 Best Chat Roulette Screenshots [NSFW]

10. The Atlantic — Caring for Your Introvert

"Science has learned a good deal in recent years about the habits and requirements of introverts. It has even learned, by means of brain scans, that introverts process information differently from other people (I am not making this up). If you are behind the curve on this important matter, be reassured that you are not alone."

Written back in 2003, this one might not technically be most popular thing ever posted at TheAtlantic.com, but I'm told that if it's not #1, it's close.

Link: Caring for Your Introvert

11. Smithsonian Snapshot — Parachute Wedding Dress

"This wedding dress was made from a nylon parachute that saved Maj. Claude Hensinger during World War II."

Link: Parachute Wedding Dress

12. YesButNoButYes — 15 Unintentionally Hilarious Comic Book Panels

YesButNoButYes is no more, but several of their writers — Miss Cellania and myself included — spent good times writing over there. Nothing I contributed ever approached the pageview onslaught of this Rich Barrett masterpiece.

Link: 15 Unintentionally Hilarious Comic Book Panels [NSFW]

13. Go Fug Yourself — A Royal Fugging: Wedding Live-Blog

Excerpt: "1:22 a.m: Blah blah blah. Ann Curry is talking about balloons."

Link: Will & Kate's Wedding Live-Blog

14. The Daily Beast — Did the White House Pressure General Shelton to Help a Prominent Donor?

Narrowing down the top Daily Beast story was tough. Do we count all the old Newsweek content? We decided to go with the top story since the merge.

Link: Did the White House Pressure General Shelton to Help a Prominent Donor?

Bonus Newsweek Link (from 1995): The Internet? Bah! Why Cyberspace Isn't, and Will Never Be, Nirvana

15. Twaggies — That's Larsony!

As someone once said (on Twitter, of course), Twaggies is kind of like the Twitter Hall of Fame.

Link: That's Larsony!

16. The Daily Dish, Featuring Andrew Sullivan — The Odd Lies of Sarah Palin

© BRIAN SNYDER/Reuters/Corbis

Sarah Palin equals pageviews.

Link: The Odd Lies of Sarah Palin

17. PhillyMag — Jon + Kate + 8 = $$$

This lengthy 2009 profile on the Gosselins nabbed the top spot over at Philadelphia Magazine.

Link: Jon + Kate + 8 = $$$

18. Capital New York — Bloomberg to Protesters: Clear Zuccotti Park

Protests equal pageviews, too.

Link: Bloomberg to Protesters: Clear Zuccotti Park

19. MetroFocus — Observations of a Jailed Journalist

Probably the youngest site on the list, MetroFocus covers life in New York. Back in September, their editor John Farley was working on a story on citizen journalism and wound up in jail.

Link: Observations of a Jailed Journalist

20. Miss Cellania — Sadie Hawkins Day

When she's not working here (or Neatorama, or...), Miss Cellania maintains her own site. This piece on the history of Sadie Hawkins Day has been getting steady traffic for years.

Link: Sadie Hawkins Day

21. The Winslow Gardens — The Front in the Morning

This is our art director's Tumblr blog. He wouldn't let me see his stats, so I picked this post at random.

Link: The Winslow Gardens
* * * * * *
We're still waiting (hoping) to hear back from a bunch of other places. If we do, expect a sequel. If there are other sites you're curious about, let us know in the comments — and if you run or work for another web entity, feel free to give your most popular story a plug and a link below.

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Space
Google Street View Now Lets You Explore the International Space Station

Google Street View covers some amazing locations (Antarctica, the Grand Canyon, and Stonehenge, to name a few), but it’s taken until now for the tool to venture into the final frontier. As TechCrunch reports, you can now use Street View to explore the inside of the International Space Station.

The scenes, photographed by astronauts living on the ISS, include all 15 modules of the massive satellite. Viewers will be treated to true 360-degree views of the rooms and equipment onboard. Through the windows, you can see Earth from an astronaut's perspective and a SpaceX Dragon craft delivering supplies to the crew.

Because the imagery was captured in zero gravity, it’s easy to lose sense of your bearings. Get a taste of what ISS residents experience on a daily basis here.

[h/t TechCrunch]

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travel
6 East Coast Castles to Visit for a Fairy Tale Road Trip
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Lucy Quintanilla/iStock

Once the stuff of fairy tales and legends, a variety of former castles have been repurposed today as museums and event spaces. Enough of them dot the East Coast that you can plan a summer road trip to visit half a dozen in a week or two, starting in or near New York City. See our turrent-rich itinerary below.

STOP 1: BANNERMAN CASTLE // BEACON, NEW YORK

59 miles from New York City

The crumbling exterior of Bannerman Castle
Garrett Ziegler, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Bannerman Castle can be found on its very own island in the Hudson River. Although the castle has fallen into ruins, the crumbling shell adds visual interest to the stunning Hudson Highlands views, and can be visited via walking or boat tours from May to October. The man who built the castle, Scottish immigrant Frank Bannerman, accumulated a fortune shortly after the Civil War in his Brooklyn store known as Bannerman’s. He eventually built the Scottish-style castle as both a residence and a military weapons storehouse starting in 1901. The island remained in his family until 1967, when it was given to the Taconic Park Commission; two years later it was partially destroyed by a mysterious fire, which led to its ruined appearance.

STOP 2. GILLETTE CASTLE STATE PARK // EAST HADDAM, CONNECTICUT

116 miles from Beacon, New York

William Gillette was an actor best known for playing Sherlock Holmes, which may have something to do with where he got the idea to install a series of hidden mirrors in his castle, using them to watch guests coming and going. The unusual-looking stone structure was built starting in 1914 on a chain of hills known as the Seven Sisters. Gillette designed many of the castle’s interior features (which feature a secret room), and also installed a railroad on the property so he could take his guests for rides. When he died in 1937 without designating any heirs, his will forbade the possession of his home by any "blithering sap-head who has no conception of where he is or with what surrounded.” The castle is now managed by the State of Connecticut as Gillette Castle State Park.

STOP 3. BELCOURT CASTLE // NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND

74 miles from East Haddam, Connecticut

The exterior of Belcourt castle
Jenna Rose Robbins, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Prominent architect Richard Morris Hunt designed Belcourt Castle for congressman and socialite Oliver Belmont in 1891. Hunt was known for his ornate style, having designed the facade of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island, but Belmont had some unusual requests. He was less interested in a building that would entertain people and more in one that would allow him to spend time with his horses—the entire first floor was designed around a carriage room and stables. Despite its grand scale, there was only one bedroom. Construction cost $3.2 million in 1894, a figure of approximately $80 million today. But around the time it was finished, Belmont was hospitalized following a mugging. It took an entire year before he saw his completed mansion.

STOP 4. HAMMOND CASTLE MUSEUM // GLOUCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS

111 miles from Newport, Rhode Island

Part of the exterior of Hammond castle
Robert Linsdell, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0

Inventor John Hays Hammond Jr. built his medieval-style castle between 1926 and 1929 as both his home and a showcase for his historical artifacts. But Hammond was not only interested in recreating visions of the past; he also helped shape the future. The castle was home to the Hammond Research Corporation, from which Hammond produced over 400 patents and came up with the ideas for over 800 inventions, including remote control via radio waves—which earned him the title "the Father of Remote Control." Visitors can take a self-guided tour of many of the castle’s rooms, including the great hall, indoor courtyard, Renaissance dining room, guest bedrooms, inventions exhibit room, library, and kitchens.

STOP 5. BOLDT CASTLE // ALEXANDRIA BAY, THOUSAND ISLANDS, NEW YORK

430 miles from Gloucester, Massachusetts

It's a long drive from Gloucester and only accessible by water, but it's worth it. The German-style castle on Heart Island was built in 1900 by millionaire hotel magnate George C. Boldt, who created the extravagant structure as a summer dream home for his wife Louise. Sadly, she passed away just months before the place was completed. The heartbroken Boldt stopped construction, leaving the property empty for over 70 years. It's now in the midst of an extensive renovation, but the ballroom, library, and several bedrooms have been recreated, and the gardens feature thousands of plants.

STOP 6. FONTHILL CASTLE // DOYLESTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

327 miles from Alexandria Bay, New York

Part of the exterior of Fonthill castle

In the mood for more castles? Head south to Doylestown, Pennsylvania, where Fonthill Castle was the home of the early 20th century American archeologist, anthropologist, and antiquarian Henry Chapman Mercer. Mercer was a man of many interests, including paleontology, tile-making, and architecture, and his interest in the latter led him to design Fonthill Castle as a place to display his colorful tile and print collection. The inspired home is notable for its Medieval, Gothic, and Byzantine architectural styles, and with 44 rooms, there's plenty of well-decorated nooks and crannies to explore.

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