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Pictures at 11: 11 Photojournalism Classics

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1. Into the Jaws of Death by Robert F. Sargent

The photo was taken on June 6, 1944, by Robert F. Sargent. It depicts U.S. Army First Division soldiers disembarking from a LCVP from the U.S. Coast Guard-manned USS Samuel Chase at Omaha Beach during the Normandy Landings in World War II. The phrase "into the jaws of Death" in the photograph's title comes from a refrain in Alfred Tennyson 's poem "The Charge of the Light Brigade."

2. Migrant Mother by Dorothea Lange

This is the classic image that has come to represent the Great Depression. The woman in the photo is Florence Thompson. The original photo featured Florence's thumb and index finger on the tent pole, but the image was later retouched to hide Florence's thumb. Her index finger was left untouched.

3. Saigon, 1968 by Eddie Adams

Like many on this list, Eddie Adams’ name is well-known and attached to one specific photograph. Often referred to as “Saigon, 1968,” Adams said the image haunted him for the rest of his life.

4. Gandhi at his spinning wheel by Margaret Bourke-White

Bourke-White is known equally well in both India and Pakistan for her photographs of Gandhi at his spinning wheel and Pakistan's founder, Mohammed Ali Jinnah, upright in a chair. She also was called "one of the most effective chroniclers" of the violence that erupted at the independence and partition of India and Pakistan.

5. The Falling Soldier by Robert Capa


Taken by Robert Capa on September 5, 1936 and long thought to depict the death of a Republican, specifically an Iberian Federation of Libertarian Youth (FIJL) soldier during the Spanish Civil War, who was later identified as the anarchist Federico Borrell García. The full title of the photograph is Loyalist Militiaman at the Moment of Death, Cerro Muriano, September 5, 1936.

6. Iranian Demonstrators by David Burnett

Over the course of the 44 consecutive days that shocked the world in 1979, Burnett photographed the initial uprisings that culminated in mass demonstrations, violence and mourning. He also captured the celebrations of revolutionary Shiites upon the fall of a monarch. At the time, Burnett's photographs were featured extensively in Time magazine.

7. Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville by Robert Doisneau


While Doisneau is renowned for his 1950 image Le baiser de l'hôtel de ville (Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville), a photo of a couple kissing in the busy streets of Paris, he, along with Henri Cartier-Bresson, is considered one of the main pioneers of photojournalism, period. He spent much of his life shooting "ordinary" street scenes, which was revolutionary at the time. I think the reason people love the Kiss photo so much is because it reminds us how short life is. It says: don't miss opportunities to enjoy your life. It says: Kiss the one you're with. It says: Public displays of affection shouldn't be scoffed at. It says: Just do it! So what are you waiting for? Stop reading this post now and reach out to the ones you care about and tell them as much! Tell them you love them, or at least kove them (a word I just coined: one keystroke away from "love").

8. The Battle For Saigon by Philip Jones Griffiths


U.S. policy in Vietnam was based on the premise that peasants driven into the towns and cities by the carpet-bombing of the countryside would be safe. Furthermore, removed from their traditional value system they could be prepared for imposition of consumerism. This "restructuring" of society suffered a setback when, in 1968, death rained down on the urban enclaves.

9. Behind the Gare St. Lazare by Henri Cartier-Bresson


While this might be the most iconic work by Cartier-Bresson, he never thought the photo was such a big deal. Of it, he said, ”There was a plank fence around some repairs behind the Gare St. Lazare and I was peeking through the space with my camera at my eye. This is what I saw. The space between the planks was not entirely wide enough for my lens, which is the reason the picture is cut off on the left.”

10. Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima by Joe Rosenthal


Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima is one of the most iconic photos in history. It was taken by Joe Rosenthal in 1945 and went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in the same year. This was not the first time the american flag was raised on Iwo Jima. Earlier that day when this part of the island was originally captured, the first flag was raised, a smaller one, more makeshift in appearance. This scene is actually the replacement of the original flag with a more substantial one.

11. First Flag Raising on Iwo Jima by Staff Sergeant Louis R. Lowery

Here is the real flag raising shot, raised atop the mountain soon after it was captured early in the morning of February 23, 1945. According to this source, Captain Dave Severance was ordered by 2nd Battalion Commander Chandler Johnson to send a platoon to go take the mountain. "Severance, the commander of Easy Company, ordered First Lieutenant Harold G. Schrier to lead the patrol. Just before Schrier was to head up the mountain, Commander Chandler Johnson handed him a flag saying, 'If you get to the top, put it up.' Johnson's adjutant, second lieutenant Greeley Wells, had taken the 54-by-28-inch (140-by-71-centimeter) American flag from their transport ship, the USS Missoula. The patrol reached the top without incident and the flag was raised, and photographed by Staff Sergeant Louis R. Lowery, a photographer with Leatherneck magazine.

For 11-11-11, we'll be posting twenty-four '11 lists' throughout the day. Check back 11 minutes after every hour for the latest installment, or see them all here.

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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Check Out These Images of Last Night's Spectacular Harvest Moon
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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Each year, a special moon comes calling around the autumnal equinox: the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon—the full moon that falls nearest to the equinox—rises near sunset for several days in a row, making early evenings extra-bright for a few days when farmers traditionally reveled in the extra-long twilight while harvesting their crops at the end of the summer season. And because the moon looks larger and more orange when it's near the horizon, it's particularly spectacular as it rises.

The Harvest Moon
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

October 5 marked 2017’s Harvest Moon, and you may have noticed an extra spectacular sky if you were looking up last night. It's rare for the Harvest Moon to come so late in the year: The last time it came in October was in 2009. (Last year's fell on September 16, 2016.) Here are a few luminous lunar pictures from the event, some of which make the moon look totally unreal:

And if you missed seeing the event yourself, don't worry too much: the moon will still look full for several days.

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Adobe
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With Help From Photoshop and AI, No One Will Know You Blinked in That Photo
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Adobe

After 15 minutes of posing for group photo after group photo, it looks like you’ve finally snapped the perfect one. Grandma is smiling, your nephew is sitting still, and even the dog is looking at the camera for once. Then, you find yourself in the corner: The shutter managed to capture the exact moment you blinked. Time to resume the positions.

With a new tool from Adobe, this scenario could become less common. Instead of retaking a picture every time someone closes their eyes, this feature would let you salvage the “ruined” photograph with a few clicks in Photoshop, Gizmodo reports.

The latest update of Photoshop Elements allows users to select the “Open Closed Eyes” option, choose which face in the photo they want to correct, and provide several additional photos of the subject with their eyes open. The software uses artificial intelligence to analyze each picture and determine which pair of peepers best matches the colors and lighting from the primary photograph. It then automatically pastes those eyes over the lids and blends them to make the addition look seamless.

Photoshop Elements (a simplified version of Adobe’s original image editor) offers many features that use AI algorithms to improve picture quality. Elements can automatically generate backgrounds when you move objects in a photo, suggest the best effects, and turn frowns into smiles. It even remembers the look you prefer and suggests personalized tone corrections. All of those capabilities and the new “Open Closed Eyes” tool are available today to customers who purchase Photoshop Elements 2018 for $100 (or upgrade their existing license for $80).

[h/t Gizmodo]

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