CLOSE
Original image

Pictures at 11: 11 Photojournalism Classics

Original image

1. Into the Jaws of Death by Robert F. Sargent

The photo was taken on June 6, 1944, by Robert F. Sargent. It depicts U.S. Army First Division soldiers disembarking from a LCVP from the U.S. Coast Guard-manned USS Samuel Chase at Omaha Beach during the Normandy Landings in World War II. The phrase "into the jaws of Death" in the photograph's title comes from a refrain in Alfred Tennyson 's poem "The Charge of the Light Brigade."

2. Migrant Mother by Dorothea Lange

This is the classic image that has come to represent the Great Depression. The woman in the photo is Florence Thompson. The original photo featured Florence's thumb and index finger on the tent pole, but the image was later retouched to hide Florence's thumb. Her index finger was left untouched.

3. Saigon, 1968 by Eddie Adams

Like many on this list, Eddie Adams’ name is well-known and attached to one specific photograph. Often referred to as “Saigon, 1968,” Adams said the image haunted him for the rest of his life.

4. Gandhi at his spinning wheel by Margaret Bourke-White

Bourke-White is known equally well in both India and Pakistan for her photographs of Gandhi at his spinning wheel and Pakistan's founder, Mohammed Ali Jinnah, upright in a chair. She also was called "one of the most effective chroniclers" of the violence that erupted at the independence and partition of India and Pakistan.

5. The Falling Soldier by Robert Capa


Taken by Robert Capa on September 5, 1936 and long thought to depict the death of a Republican, specifically an Iberian Federation of Libertarian Youth (FIJL) soldier during the Spanish Civil War, who was later identified as the anarchist Federico Borrell García. The full title of the photograph is Loyalist Militiaman at the Moment of Death, Cerro Muriano, September 5, 1936.

6. Iranian Demonstrators by David Burnett

Over the course of the 44 consecutive days that shocked the world in 1979, Burnett photographed the initial uprisings that culminated in mass demonstrations, violence and mourning. He also captured the celebrations of revolutionary Shiites upon the fall of a monarch. At the time, Burnett's photographs were featured extensively in Time magazine.

7. Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville by Robert Doisneau


While Doisneau is renowned for his 1950 image Le baiser de l'hôtel de ville (Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville), a photo of a couple kissing in the busy streets of Paris, he, along with Henri Cartier-Bresson, is considered one of the main pioneers of photojournalism, period. He spent much of his life shooting "ordinary" street scenes, which was revolutionary at the time. I think the reason people love the Kiss photo so much is because it reminds us how short life is. It says: don't miss opportunities to enjoy your life. It says: Kiss the one you're with. It says: Public displays of affection shouldn't be scoffed at. It says: Just do it! So what are you waiting for? Stop reading this post now and reach out to the ones you care about and tell them as much! Tell them you love them, or at least kove them (a word I just coined: one keystroke away from "love").

8. The Battle For Saigon by Philip Jones Griffiths


U.S. policy in Vietnam was based on the premise that peasants driven into the towns and cities by the carpet-bombing of the countryside would be safe. Furthermore, removed from their traditional value system they could be prepared for imposition of consumerism. This "restructuring" of society suffered a setback when, in 1968, death rained down on the urban enclaves.

9. Behind the Gare St. Lazare by Henri Cartier-Bresson


While this might be the most iconic work by Cartier-Bresson, he never thought the photo was such a big deal. Of it, he said, ”There was a plank fence around some repairs behind the Gare St. Lazare and I was peeking through the space with my camera at my eye. This is what I saw. The space between the planks was not entirely wide enough for my lens, which is the reason the picture is cut off on the left.”

10. Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima by Joe Rosenthal


Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima is one of the most iconic photos in history. It was taken by Joe Rosenthal in 1945 and went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in the same year. This was not the first time the american flag was raised on Iwo Jima. Earlier that day when this part of the island was originally captured, the first flag was raised, a smaller one, more makeshift in appearance. This scene is actually the replacement of the original flag with a more substantial one.

11. First Flag Raising on Iwo Jima by Staff Sergeant Louis R. Lowery

Here is the real flag raising shot, raised atop the mountain soon after it was captured early in the morning of February 23, 1945. According to this source, Captain Dave Severance was ordered by 2nd Battalion Commander Chandler Johnson to send a platoon to go take the mountain. "Severance, the commander of Easy Company, ordered First Lieutenant Harold G. Schrier to lead the patrol. Just before Schrier was to head up the mountain, Commander Chandler Johnson handed him a flag saying, 'If you get to the top, put it up.' Johnson's adjutant, second lieutenant Greeley Wells, had taken the 54-by-28-inch (140-by-71-centimeter) American flag from their transport ship, the USS Missoula. The patrol reached the top without incident and the flag was raised, and photographed by Staff Sergeant Louis R. Lowery, a photographer with Leatherneck magazine.

For 11-11-11, we'll be posting twenty-four '11 lists' throughout the day. Check back 11 minutes after every hour for the latest installment, or see them all here.

Original image
Courtesy of Nikon
arrow
science
Microscopic Videos Provide a Rare Close-Up Glimpse of the Natural World
Original image
Courtesy of Nikon

Nature’s wonders aren’t always visible to the naked eye. To celebrate the miniature realm, Nikon’s Small World in Motion digital video competition awards prizes to the most stunning microscopic moving images, as filmed and submitted by photographers and scientists. The winners of the seventh annual competition were just announced on September 21—and you can check out the top submissions below.

FIRST PRIZE

Daniel von Wangenheim, a biologist at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria, took first place with a time-lapse video of thale cress root growth. For the uninitiated, thale cress—known to scientists as Arabidopsis thalianais a small flowering plant, considered by many to be a weed. Plant and genetics researchers like thale cress because of its fast growth cycle, abundant seed production, ability to pollinate itself, and wild genes, which haven’t been subjected to breeding and artificial selection.

Von Wangenheim’s footage condenses 17 hours of root tip growth into just 10 seconds. Magnified with a confocal microscope, the root appears neon green and pink—but von Wangenheim’s work shouldn’t be appreciated only for its aesthetics, he explains in a Nikon news release.

"Once we have a better understanding of the behavior of plant roots and its underlying mechanisms, we can help them grow deeper into the soil to reach water, or defy gravity in upper areas of the soil to adjust their root branching angle to areas with richer nutrients," said von Wangenheim, who studies how plants perceive and respond to gravity. "One step further, this could finally help to successfully grow plants under microgravity conditions in outer space—to provide food for astronauts in long-lasting missions."

SECOND PRIZE

Second place went to Tsutomu Tomita and Shun Miyazaki, both seasoned micro-photographers. They used a stereomicroscope to create a time-lapse video of a sweating fingertip, resulting in footage that’s both mesmerizing and gross.

To prompt the scene, "Tomita created tension amongst the subjects by showing them a video of daredevils climbing to the top of a skyscraper," according to Nikon. "Sweating is a common part of daily life, but being able to see it at a microscopic level is equal parts enlightening and cringe-worthy."

THIRD PRIZE

Third prize was awarded to Satoshi Nishimura, a professor from Japan’s Jichi Medical University who’s also a photography hobbyist. He filmed leukocyte accumulations and platelet aggregations in injured mouse cells. The rainbow-hued video "provides a rare look at how the body reacts to a puncture wound and begins the healing process by creating a blood clot," Nikon said.

To view the complete list of winners, visit Nikon’s website.

Original image
Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Fort Totten Agency. 1903-1947, National Archives and Records Administration
arrow
History
Help the National Archives Tag Photos of Life on Native American Reservations
Original image
Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Fort Totten Agency. 1903-1947, National Archives and Records Administration

The National Archives needs your help. The federal agency is looking for volunteer archivists to make its collections of photography from life on Native American reservations more accessible via online searches.

Volunteers will tag these historic photos of reservation life, taken in the early- and mid-20th century by photographers from federal agencies like the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Citizen archivists can generate searchable tags by identifying the people, places, and activities shown in the images. It helps if you have a bit of insider knowledge and can recognize individuals or the locations where the images were shot, but non-experts can lend a hand by labeling what's happening in the photos.

Corn dries in front of a log cabin.
Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Fort Totten Agency. 1903-1947, National Archives and Records Administration

The collections span everything from images of 4-H participants from 1933 to photos of locations you can no longer see, such as parts of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota that were flooded by the construction of a dam in the late 1940s, causing the tribes who lived there to lose 94 percent of their agricultural land. Tagging these photos makes these vital documentations of reservation life more accessible to the public and to scholars.

Previously, the National Archives has solicited regular folks for other digitization projects, including transcribing declassified documents that included records from UFO sightings and tagging a congressional cookbook.

To participate, start with the National Archives' email newsletter, which contains some ideas for which collections to start on. You can register as a "citizen archivist" on archives.gov.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios