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The Flashy Girl From La Florida: The Nanny's Global Success

In its six seasons on CBS, The Nanny never broke into the Top 10 in ratings, peaking at #16 in season three. And this was before it was nearly canceled after a dismal first season. It was not a critical darling, nor an award-winner, garnering only one Emmy in its entire run: Best Costume Design. Yet despite a modest first-run performance, The Nanny has achieved great success in the years since its cancellation.

The Nanny soared overseas. Dubbed versions were broadcast worldwide with minor tweaks for cultural relevance. And then, Sony Pictures Television began marketing franchise licenses. By licensing The Nanny, foreign producers not only gained access to the story and scripts – they gained the authority to completely remake it.

So what makes the story of a Jewish-American girl with big hair from Flushing who serendipitously ended up as a nanny for a wealthy, British theatrical producer so darn universal? Show creator Fran Drescher chalks it up to the appeal of blue-collar meets blue-blood. The details might not be universal, but class struggle is. Here are some of the more successful adaptations.

Russia: My Fair Nanny

When it premiered in 2004, The Nanny was the first sitcom to ever air on Russian television. It was in such demand the producers ran out of scripts and hired some of the show’s American writers to create more.

Instead of being a Jewish-American woman named Fran from Flushing, “Vika” is a Ukrainian woman who moves from her working class neighborhood of ???????? to be a nanny for Maxim’s swanky Moscow family.

Poland: Niania

The Polish version ran for 134 episodes, boasting millions of viewers. Remaining pretty faithful to the original, Niania named its main characters Frania and Maks. Unlike the original, however, the Jewish heritage of the original character was omitted and Frania’s nationality is never really addressed.
In the opening credits, Frania takes a trolley to uptown Warsaw instead of hailing a cab.

Greece: ? ??????

This version aired on Greek channel Mega TV for two seasons.

In the original version, the wealthy father character was British and quite uptight. In this version Aris appears to be openly lecherous when it comes to the nanny named Mary. Also, the butler has foregone clean-cut suits for a more casual sweater and slacks look.

Argentina: La Niñera

After being kicked to the curb, Florencia Finkel shows up at the door of Juan Manuel Iraola. She hails from provincial neighborhood Lanús, an industrial hub located south of Buenos Aires. Juan lives in the upscale Buenos Aires neighborhood of Barrio Parque. Re-runs are still shown in Venezuela, Puerto Rico and on satellite channels.

La Niñera’s opening credits completely forgo the signature animation and theme song of the original.

Mexico: La Niñera

The Flushing of Mexico City is Roma, a declining neighborhood west of central Mexico City that, unlike Flushing, has become a trendy bohemian enclave in more recent years. As in the original, Francisca Flores is hired by a wealthy theater producer to be a nanny. In this version, Maximiliano Fabregas lives in Polanco, known for its impressive mansions and having the most expensive land prices in Mexico City.

The animation is similar to the original, but this version’s star, Lisset, sings the revamped theme song.

Chile: La Nany

Eliana Tapia Cardenas finds herself ousted from La Florida, a provincial commune in Santiago. She heads for the most prestigious neighborhood in all of Santiago, La Dehesa. There, she is hired by successful publicist/dad Max Valdivieso.

The opening credits use their own unique animation. One notable difference is Max is not dressed in a formal suit, and looks more like a playboy.

Turkey: Dadi

This appears to be the inaugural adaptation. Set in Istanbul, Melek becomes the nanny for Ömer’s children. Instead of big poofy hair, often a joke in the original version, Melek has short, spiky hair.

Here’s part of an episode with English subtitles. Like many of its peer adaptations, the opening credits do not use the animation or theme song.

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Move Over, Star Wars Land: A Star Trek World May Be Coming to Universal Studios
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As Disney gears up for the 2019 openings of Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge at both its Florida and California amusement parks, there may be some sci-fi-themed competition on the horizon. According to Disney and More, there’s a rumor out there that Universal is planning a fourth Orlando theme park, which will include a land dedicated to all things Star Trek.

The blog also states that there have been rumblings that a Star Trek stage show at Universal would take the place of the now-defunct Terminator 2 3D show, but that’s just one option, with a Bourne Identity attraction being the other. Instead, the potential Star Trek show could be expanded to a whole area of the rumored fourth park, with a focus on a recreation of a sci-fi city, according to the site.

This rumored park would be the most high-profile Trek attraction since Las Vegas's Star Trek: The Experience (as seen in the main image). Housed at the Las Vegas Hilton from 1998 to 2008, Star Trek: The Experience included a restaurant based on Quark's bar from Deep Space Nine and the popular Borg Invasion 4D, which was an attraction that combined motion platforms, live actors, and a short 3D film to simulate a Borg takeover.

Any potential Star Trek land would be much further off than Galaxy's Edge's fall 2019 debut in Orlando. But with two new Trek movies on the horizon, and Star Trek: Discovery returning to CBS All Access for a second season in 2018, the venerable sci-fi franchise might just be able to ride a wave of momentum to become real competition for Star Wars—if not at the box office, then at least as a theme park.

[h/t Screen Rant]

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10 Things You Might Not Know About Steve Martin
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NBC Television/Courtesy of Getty Images

Is there anything Steve Martin can't do? In addition to being one of the world's most beloved comedians and actors, he's also a writer, a musician, a magician, and an art enthusiast. And he's about to put a number of these talents on display with Steve Martin and Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget for the Rest of Your Life, a new comedy special that just arrived on Netflix. To commemorate the occasion, here are 10 things you might not have known about Steve Martin.

1. HE WAS A CHEERLEADER.

As a yellleader (as he refers to it in a yearbook signature) at his high school in Garden Grove, California, Martin tried to make up his own cheers, but “Die, you gravy-sucking pigs,” he later told Newsweek, did not go over so well.

2. HIS FIRST JOB WAS AT DISNEYLAND.

Martin’s first-ever job was at Disneyland, which was located just two miles away from his house. He started out selling guidebooks, keeping $.02 for every book he sold. He graduated to the Magic Shop on Main Street, where he got his first taste of the gags that would later make his career. He also learned the rope tricks you see in ¡Three Amigos! from a rope wrangler over in Frontierland.

3. HE OWES HIS WRITING JOB WITH THE SMOTHERS BROTHERS TO AN EX-GIRLFRIEND.

Thanks to a girlfriend who got a job dancing on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, Martin landed a gig writing for the show. He had absolutely no experience as a writer at the time. He shared an office with Bob Einstein—better known to some as Super Dave Osborne or Marty Funkhauser—and won an Emmy for writing in 1969.

4. HE WAS A CONTESTANT ON THE DATING GAME.

While he was writing for the Smothers Brothers, but before he was famous in his own right, Martin was on an episode of The Dating Game. (Spoiler alert: He wins. But did you have any doubt?)

5. MANY PEOPLE THOUGHT HE WAS A SERIES REGULAR ON SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE.

Martin hosted and did guest spots on Saturday Night Live so often in the 1970s and '80s that many people thought he was a series regular. He wasn't. 

6. HIS FATHER WROTE A REVIEW OF HIS FIRST SNL APPEARANCE.

After his first appearance on SNL, Martin’s father, the president of the Newport Beach Association of Realtors, wrote a review of his son’s performance in the company newsletter. “His performance did nothing to further his career,” the elder Martin wrote. He also once told a newspaper, “I think Saturday Night Live is the most horrible thing on television.”

7. HE POPULARIZED THE AIR QUOTE.

If you find yourself making air quotes with your fingers more than you’d really like, you have Martin to thank. He popularized the gesture during his guest spots on SNL and stand-up performances.

8. HE QUIT STAND-UP COMEDY IN THE EARLY 1980S.

Martin gave up stand-up comedy in 1981. “I still had a few obligations left but I knew that I could not continue,” he told NPR in 2009. “But I guess I could have continued if I had nothing to go to, but I did have something to go to, which was movies. And you know, the act had become so known that in order to go back, I would have had to create an entirely new show, and I wasn't up to it, especially when the opportunity for movies and writing movies came around.”

9. HE'S A MAJOR ART COLLECTOR.

As an avid art collector, Martin owns works by Pablo Picasso, Roy Lichtenstein, David Hockney, and Edward Hopper. He sold a Hopper for $26.9 million in 2006. Unfortunately, being rich and famous doesn’t mean Martin is immune to scams: In 2004, he spent about $850,000 on a piece believed to be by German-Dutch modernist painter Heinrich Campendonk. When Martin tried to sell the piece, “Landschaft mit Pferden” (or "Landscape With Horses") 15 months later, he was informed that it was a forgery. Though the painting still sold, it was at a huge loss.

10. HE'S AN ACCOMPLISHED BLUEGRASS PERFORMER.

Many people already know this, but we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention that he’s an extremely accomplished bluegrass performer. With the help of high school friend John McEuen, who later became a member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Martin taught himself to play the banjo when he was 17. He's been picking away ever since. If you see him on stage these days, he’s likely strumming a banjo with his band, the Steep Canyon Rangers. As seen above, they make delightful videos.

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