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12 Songs that mention other songs or artists

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This is clearly not a definitive list. I encourage you all to help us build the list by leaving your additions in the comments below.

1. Cheap Trick

Song: “Surrender”
Mention: … got my Kiss records out


2. The Red Hot Chili Peppers

Song: “Californication”
Mention: Cobain can you hear the spheres singing songs off station to station
Also: References David Bowie’s album Station to Station

3. Lynyrd Skynyrd

Song: "Sweet Home Alabama"
Mention: Well I heard mister Young sing about her
Well, I heard ole Neil put her down
Well, I hope Neil Young will remember

4. Johnny Rivers

Song: "Summer Rain"
Mention: Everybody kept on playing Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band

5. Better than Ezra
Song: “Extra Ordinary”
Mentions: (Many in this song, but my favorites):

Though I got more hooks
Than Madonna got looks
And just like that AC/DC song
Come on baby, shake me all night long

6. Billy Joel
Song: “We Didn't Start The Fire”
Mentions: (Again, lots in here): Roy Cohn, Juan Peron, Toscanini, Dacron
Dien Bien Phu Falls, Rock Around the Clock - Einstein, James Dean, Brooklyn's got a winning team
Davy Crockett, Peter Pan, Elvis Presley, Disneyland

7. Regina Spektor
Song: “On the Radio”
Mentions: (Guns N’ Roses song)
On the radio we heard november rain
the solo's real long, but it's a pretty song
we listened to it twice 'cause the dj was asleep

8. Arctic Monkeys
Song: “Bet You Look Good On The Dance Floor”
Mentions: Your name isn't Rio, but I don't care for sand

9. Electric Light Orchestra
Song: “Shangri La”
Mentions: My Shangri-la has gone away,
Faded like the Beatles on Hey Jude

10. Bruce Springsteen
Song: “Thunder Road”
Mentions: Like a vision she dances across the porch as the radio plays
Roy Orbison singing for the lonely

11. The Beatles
Song: “Yer Blues”
Mentions: The eagle picks my eye, the worm he licks my bones
Feel so suicidal, just like Dylan's Mr. Jones

12. Wolfmother
Song: “Dimension"
Mentions: Purple haze is in the sky...

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Big Questions
What's the Difference Between an Opera and a Musical?
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They both have narrative arcs set to song, so how are musicals different from operas?

For non-theater types, the word “musical” conjures up images of stylized Broadway performances—replete with high-kicks and punchy songs interspersed with dialogue—while operas are viewed as a musical's more melodramatic, highbrow cousin. That said, The New York Times chief classical music critic Anthony Tommasini argues that these loose categorizations don't get to the heart of the matter. For example, for every Kinky Boots, there’s a work like Les Misérables—a somber, sung-through show that elicits more audience tears than laughs. Meanwhile, operas can contain dancing and/or conversation, too, and they range in quality from lowbrow to highbrow to straight-up middlebrow.

According to Tommasini, the real distinguishing detail between a musical and an opera is that “in opera, music is the driving force; in musical theater, words come first.” While listening to an opera, it typically doesn’t matter what language it’s sung in, so long as you know the basic plot—but in musical theater, the nuance comes from the lyrics.

When it comes down to it, Tommasini’s explanation clarifies why opera stars often sing in a different style than Broadway performers do, why operas and musicals tend to have their trademark subject matters, and why musical composition and orchestration differ between the two disciplines.

That said, we live in a hybrid-crazy world in which we can order Chinese-Indian food, purchase combination jeans/leggings, and, yes, watch a Broadway musical—like 2010's Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark—that’s billed as “rock opera.” At the end of the day, the lack of hard, fast lines between opera and musical theater can lead composers from both camps to borrow from the other, thus blurring the line even further.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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History
Lost Gustav Holst Music Found in a New Zealand Symphony Archive
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English composer Gustav Holst became famous for his epic seven-piece suite "The Planets," but not all of his works were larger-than-life. Take "Folk Songs from Somerset," a collection of folk tunes composed by Holst in 1906 and largely forgotten in the decades since. Now, more than a century later, the music is finally attracting attention. As Atlas Obscura reports, manuscripts of the songs were rediscovered among a lost collection of sheet music handwritten by the musician.

The Holst originals were uncovered from the archives of a New Zealand symphony during a routine cleaning a few years ago. While throwing away old photocopies and other junk, the music director and the librarian of the Bay of Plenty (BOP) Symphonia came across two pieces of music by Holst. The scores were penned in the composer’s handwriting and labeled with his former address. Realizing the potential importance of their discovery, they stored the documents in a safe place, but it wasn't until recently that they were able to verify that the manuscripts were authentic.

For more than a century, the Holst works were thought to be lost for good. "These manuscripts are a remarkable find, particularly the ‘Folk Songs from Somerset’ which don’t exist elsewhere in this form," Colin Matthews of London's Holst Foundation said in a statement from the symphony.

How, exactly, the documents ended up in New Zealand remains a mystery. The BOP Symphonia suspects that the sheets were brought there by Stanley Farnsworth, a flutist who performed with an early version of the symphony in the 1960s. “We have clues that suggest the scores were used by Farnsworth,” orchestra member Bronya Dean said, “but we have no idea how Farnsworth came to have them, or what his connection was with Holst.”

The symphony plans to mark the discovery with a live show, including what will likely be the first performance of "Folk Songs from Somerset" in 100 years. Beyond that, BOP is considering finding a place for the artifacts in Holst’s home in England.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

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